Search found 307 matches

by Aiwendil
Fri Mar 02, 2018 5:17 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Eebster the Great wrote:gone = cot and lawn = caught?


Yep.
by Aiwendil
Tue Feb 27, 2018 6:29 pm UTC
Forum: Music
Topic: Top 10 Artists
Replies: 246
Views: 149259

Re: Top 10 Artists

Restricting this to 'popular' music:

1. The Beatles
2. The Beach Boys
3. Focus
4. Miles Davis
5. The Zombies
6. The Doors
7. Cream
8. John Coltrane
9. The Moody Blues
10. Simon and Garfunkel
by Aiwendil
Tue Feb 27, 2018 6:20 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Can we get some IPA in here? Because I've really fucking confused about how people are pronouncing "gone" right now. Dunno about IPA, but we can say what people pronounce the same or differently: 1) (poly)gon, gone, lawn all have the same vowel (Pfhorrest, freezeblade, and pogrmann) 2) go...
by Aiwendil
Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:42 am UTC
Forum: News & Articles
Topic: Trump presidency
Replies: 7985
Views: 613485

Re: Trump presidency

Jesus saves, but Moses invests.
by Aiwendil
Tue Oct 17, 2017 2:22 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I don't recall ever hearing "noir" pronounced as two syllables. But usually I'm fixated on the /ɹ/ (which always sounds wrong to me - /nwɑ/ sounds much closer to French /nwaʁ/ to my ears), so maybe I just haven't noticed the two syllable thing.
by Aiwendil
Fri Oct 06, 2017 4:06 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 1899: "Ears"
Replies: 31
Views: 4951

Re: 1899: "Ears"

I thought I was the only one!

The thing that astonishes me is when I see people running with earbuds in. I mean, I can keep them in for a few minutes, if I concentrate the whole time on holding perfectly still.
by Aiwendil
Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:23 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Yeah, I make the fiancé(e) distinction. I haven't written blond(e) in so long that I'm not sure what I'd do. Same here on both counts. Though whenever I think I can get away with it, I use "betrothed" instead of "fiancé(e)", because I think it's silly to use a French word when t...
by Aiwendil
Wed Sep 27, 2017 2:12 pm UTC
Forum: News & Articles
Topic: Trump presidency
Replies: 7985
Views: 613485

Re: Trump presidency

I'd honestly be shocked if he even knew Puerto Rico was part of the U.S. without aides telling him.
by Aiwendil
Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:01 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Separately, I should point out that spelling is not a major part of education anyway. Most kids do learn some vocab lists in school, but it's always a very minor part of English classes. Most vocabulary (and therefore spelling) comes from reading. Standardized tests do not test spelling, and assign...
by Aiwendil
Mon Sep 25, 2017 2:52 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

This is called yod-coalescence (although some varieties have yod-dropping here instead). Really? What accents have yod-dropping in "statue", "module", and "pendulum"? I'm an American and tend to have more yod-dropping than yod-coalescence, but I don't think I've ever h...
by Aiwendil
Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:14 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I'm guessing that you just mean the /ɔ/ vowel. The British don't usually flap intervocalic "t's", though I've heard that some British dialects do so or used to do so. I don't think I really understand the difference between an r-colored vowel and a vowel followed by /ɹ/ (i.e. I'm not sure...
by Aiwendil
Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:06 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Tangentially, Wiktionary gives the standard American pronunciation of water as /wɔɾɚ/, except where the caught-cot merger is present, where it gives /wɑɾəɹ/. To me the first sounds very British, and I can't say I ever recall hearing /wɔɾɚ/ from an American. I checked Youtube for videos about water ...
by Aiwendil
Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:29 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Dear God, make it stop. Hear, hear. I'm rolling my eyes along with you. We can have either a standardized spelling system or spelling that always reflects pronunciation, but not both. And yes, color/colour, center/centre, etc. notwithstanding, we do have a standardized spelling system that allows p...
by Aiwendil
Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:25 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

For most of my life I've heard everyone rhyme bury with berry. Now I sometimes hear it rhymed with hurry and worry. I think that sounds better and I'd like to adapt that pronunciation for my own use, but I am often not mindful of it. I've been living for a while in Sudbury, Ontario - which I pronou...
by Aiwendil
Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:33 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

How do people pronounce "Wikia"? I've always stressed the first syllable, but the hosts of one of the podcasts I listen to consistently stress the second, and I don't know that I've ever heard the word said aloud outside of this.
by Aiwendil
Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:10 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Sure, so: Around the turn of the 20th century, the variety of New York accent that also existed in New Jersey had undergone a curl-coil merger. The r-coloured /ɜːr/ vowel sound in J er sey was pronounced instead as the diphthong /əɪ/, which doesn't really exist in a lot of other varieties of Englis...
by Aiwendil
Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:45 pm UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 1890: "What to Bring"
Replies: 70
Views: 12915

Re: 1890: "What to Bring"

Moose Anus wrote:I'm not convinced that water is the right thing to bring to a wood fire.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CL4zNgZPPHw


Battle Beasts! My goodness, did I love those.

That is all.
by Aiwendil
Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:27 pm UTC
Forum: Gaming
Topic: Chess!
Replies: 86
Views: 26101

Re: Chess!

Spoiler:
Doesn't the puzzle require that Ron sacrifice himself? Maybe I've missed it, but I don't see the Ron sacrifice in any of the solutions discussed above.
by Aiwendil
Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:45 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1969
Views: 438644

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Something that's been bothering me lately: a lot of people seem to be using "equivocate" as a transitive verb, as if it means something like "equate" (and similarly "equivocation" as if it means "equivalence"). I've read news articles, for instance, that say s...
by Aiwendil
Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:58 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

Non-English 26ers include Dutch (Ij directly replacing Y, it seems, a detail to which I would clearly defer to any Dutch forumite who cared to comment) I'm Dutch, so let me wade in here about the Dutch "IJ". It represents a vowel sound, one of the many diphthongs spoken Dutch has. It is n...
by Aiwendil
Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:47 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I (US) definitely have /dʒ/; I'm not sure if I've heard it with just /dj/. I might have a bit of a /j/ there after the /dʒ/ (so /ˈskɛdʒjl̩/), but if so it's really subtle and might just be because of the /ʒ/. I normally have two syllables, but /ˈskedʒ.ju.l̩/ doesn't sound wrong to me (I pronounce t...
by Aiwendil
Thu Aug 31, 2017 12:28 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

The OED says: Often is less commonly used than oft until the 16th cent. Several orthoepists of the 16th and 17th centuries, including Hart, Bullokar, Robinson, Gil, and Hodges, give a pronunciation with medial -t- . Others, including Coles, Young, Strong, and Brown, record a pronunciation without -t...
by Aiwendil
Wed Aug 30, 2017 11:32 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

I hear Q pon in the American Southeast relatively often ( offen ?) but pretty much only by people with robust accents. The t is silent, as in "soften." I think I heard some native speakers say the t in often, but I don't remember which ones (or where they were from). I pronounce the t in ...
by Aiwendil
Sun Aug 27, 2017 4:10 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

You're right, those usages had slipped my mind.
by Aiwendil
Sat Aug 26, 2017 5:25 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

The meanings of "yeah" and "yea" are not really the same, in my opinion. Agreed. I think of "yea" (pronounced like "yay") as the appropriate word only in parliamentary contexts and allusions thereto. There's a radio programme on tomorrow entitled "U and ...
by Aiwendil
Tue Aug 15, 2017 8:35 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

I don't know that I'd consider "bedraggled" to alliterate, seeing as it's stressed on the second syllable. There's "Bleary-eyed and battered-tailed", but the repetition of the dental suffix sounds weird there. "Bleary-eyed and beaten-tailed" could work. A bit more extre...
by Aiwendil
Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:09 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

How do you guys say words that end in -alk and -alm? I've always pronounced the l to some extent -- even in "talk". It's not super noticeable, but it is there. Despite having the caught/cot merger, "stock" and "stalk" are different for me. They've got the same vowel, b...
by Aiwendil
Wed Aug 02, 2017 1:04 am UTC
Forum: News & Articles
Topic: Trump presidency
Replies: 7985
Views: 613485

Re: Trump presidency

Semi-related, but Nate mentioned once again how obvious it is that Jared-Ivanka are the source of a lot of the palace intrigue leaks. Maybe I'm just not reading those articles? Because nothing lately has really jumped out at me. I wasn't really sure what he keeps getting at with this either, but I ...
by Aiwendil
Thu Jul 27, 2017 9:09 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

"Yelp" probably counts Really? You think a lot of people say the word "yell" and then quickly close their mouths? I mean, it makes sense for "nope", "yep", and "welp" since "no", "yeah", and "well" are common words and ...
by Aiwendil
Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:16 pm UTC
Forum: News & Articles
Topic: Trump presidency
Replies: 7985
Views: 613485

Re: Trump presidency

William Laws Calley Jr and Steven Dale Green are two examples of people who had M16s when the forces were desperately short of young men and letting just about anybody in. Lee Harvey Oswald, John Warnock Hinckley, John Wilkes Booth, Mark David Chapman, Jared Lee Loughner, James Earl Ray, Richard Br...
by Aiwendil
Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:27 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)
Replies: 941
Views: 247400

Re: Regional Dialect and Idiolect Oddities (pronunciation)

Typically I pronounce them the same because they are almost always reduced. But if stressed, I pronounce "than" as /ðæn/. Much the same for me. (As an aside, my /æ/ (as in stressed "than") is diphthongized before /n/ and /m/, and I've never been quite sure how to transcribe it. ...
by Aiwendil
Sun Jun 25, 2017 1:37 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: What is the past tense of swing?
Replies: 32
Views: 11896

Re: What is the past tense of swing?

It seems similar to me to "mouses" being sometimes accepted for the computer input device but never for the animal. Things like that bother me quite a bit for some reason - inventing a distinction that has no etymological basis. Others that come to mind are "insure" and "en...
by Aiwendil
Sat Jun 24, 2017 4:38 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: What is the past tense of swing?
Replies: 32
Views: 11896

Re: What is the past tense of swing?

It seems similar to me to "mouses" being sometimes accepted for the computer input device but never for the animal. Things like that bother me quite a bit for some reason - inventing a distinction that has no etymological basis. Others that come to mind are "insure" and "en...
by Aiwendil
Fri Jun 23, 2017 2:22 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 643
Views: 146537

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

It comes from somewhat earlier -ing , of which the OED says: A suffix forming derivative masculine ns., with the sense of ‘one belonging to’ or ‘of the kind of’, hence ‘one possessed of the quality of’, and also as a patronymic = ‘one descended from, a son of’, and as a diminutive. Found in the same...
by Aiwendil
Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:20 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 643
Views: 146537

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

Speaking of "-ling", am the only one who thinks we should reclaim it as a suffix meaning "offspring of"? For example, instead of "I swerved to avoid running over a leveret, and as a result accidentally hit one of Dan's children instead" you should be able to say "...
by Aiwendil
Fri Jun 16, 2017 2:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

On the other hand, I don't mind people in my office seeing my, often psychedelically patterned, ties. But if they can see my draws (of whatever style) I suppose have to just hope that it's just a dream that I've left my trousers at home. ;) Do you pronounce "draw" and "drawer" t...
by Aiwendil
Wed Jun 14, 2017 1:00 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

"I can not win" = The speaker is not able to win, even though his listener disagrees. This one could also be used in a context where it clearly means "the speaker is able to lose", though (and I think this is what gmalivuk meant): "What can possibly happen other than you wi...
by Aiwendil
Sat Jun 10, 2017 4:51 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

Calling soda a soft drink sounds like calling a bathroom a restroom to me. Just not something you do inside someone's house, it's a word that only exists in public and commercial spaces. This is my feeling about the word as well. Around here, "soft drink" is a neutral and slightly formal ...
by Aiwendil
Tue May 30, 2017 11:52 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Miscellaneous language questions
Replies: 570
Views: 91596

Re: Miscellaneous language questions

Why is onomatopoeia different in different languages? While English speakers say that ducks go "quack", German speakers say that frogs go "quak". Strange. Why the disagreement of what animals sound like? I think the fundamental issue is that alphabets designed by and for humans ...
by Aiwendil
Sun May 21, 2017 4:24 pm UTC
Forum: News & Articles
Topic: In other news... (humorous news items)
Replies: 14997
Views: 2388698

Re: In other news... (humorous news items)

Coyne's original point is nonetheless true, though: something can be within one's rights (e.g. protected speech) and still be harmful. For instance, freedom of speech protects people who say things like "Muslims should be banned from entering the U.S.", but saying that is still harmful to ...

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