Search found 5 matches

by Scales
Tue Apr 10, 2012 8:04 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: "these ones"
Replies: 35
Views: 8828

Re: "these ones"

Frightening. Growing up in central Texas, saying "these ones" to refer to multiple discrete objects has always been completely correct and not at all informal. I am sure I represent us as hillbillies, but it is not the case. However, I'll be sure to watch my language around northerners.
by Scales
Mon Mar 26, 2012 4:31 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously
Replies: 125
Views: 33171

Re: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously

So if I missed breakfast and I say "I'm really starving", I'm not exaggerating? No, sorry. I didn't mean to say exaggerating. Obviously you are. But it's still a case of hyperbole, whereas I don't think self-contradiction is the same. I think "literally" is a bit of a special ca...
by Scales
Mon Mar 26, 2012 12:56 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously
Replies: 125
Views: 33171

Re: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously

My take on the issue is that this is a flawed question; "literally" isn't in the same category as "really, very, truly, seriously." Literally specifically means non-figuratively. The others just mean that the speaker is not exaggerating or lying. So if I missed breakfast and I s...
by Scales
Fri Mar 23, 2012 9:00 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously
Replies: 125
Views: 33171

Re: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously

My take on the issue is that this is a flawed question; "literally" isn't in the same category as "really, very, truly, seriously." Literally specifically means non-figuratively. The others just mean that the speaker is not exaggerating or lying. When we factor in everyone's unde...
by Scales
Thu Mar 22, 2012 9:35 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: One sentence in the languages you know
Replies: 37
Views: 12974

Re: One sentence in the languages you know

There're dozens of ways to ask in Ancient Greek, and I'm no expert on it. Here's one I like: τήν Γερμανίαν εἰς ἐπει βαινείς; ten Germanian eis epei baineis? accusative-Germany into when you-will-walk Any of those words can be put in any order you prefer except that "την" must directly proc...

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