Search found 270 matches

by Eugo
Mon Aug 29, 2016 11:29 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 642
Views: 102210

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

But that doesn't make any sense. The correct form is irregular. They should have used "snuck". It is irregular only because it is not regulated. Which is why I propose more rules, to cover the cases previously classified as exceptions. Once they are all included, there will be no exceptio...
by Eugo
Sat Aug 27, 2016 6:49 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you think English should have or bring back.
Replies: 642
Views: 102210

Re: Words you think English should have or bring back.

Mega85 wrote:Another verb I've seen becoming irregular for some is "drag". I've heard people say "drug" for the past tense of "drag".


Actually, there should be no exceptions. We just need more rules.
by Eugo
Thu Apr 30, 2015 7:36 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find
Replies: 225
Views: 71425

Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

Datum isn't really used because data is a mass noun now rather than a plural form except in formal writing and a few pretentious people's speech. I don't really understand why cartographers use datum that way though, it is a mystery. I do see nape occasionally. Specifically it's the base of the bac...
by Eugo
Sat Apr 25, 2015 9:19 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find
Replies: 225
Views: 71425

Re: Words that you are sure exist, but can't find

I have an opposite problem - about words I'm sure exist (as in "found them in the dictionary") but can't remember seeing them in actual use. Here's a few. Singular of data. Data is plural; datum would be singular (or I've learned different Latin). But in places where I'd expect datum to ap...
by Eugo
Tue Sep 03, 2013 7:02 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words of buffalo type
Replies: 19
Views: 6175

Re: Words of buffalo type

I'll put a mine to mine this mine of mine, where I mine the ore.
by Eugo
Sun Feb 17, 2013 2:51 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Obscure Language Game
Replies: 305
Views: 87776

Re: Obscure Language Game

The third one looks like a Romance language. I'm going to throw out Romanian as a random guess. Definitely not - Romanian has a lot of diacriticals on vowels and a few cedillas on t and s, and doesn't have apostrophes for ellisions - uses hyphens instead. I'm not even trying to guess beyond what ot...
by Eugo
Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:25 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Places which are things
Replies: 11
Views: 3402

Re: Places which are things

No, he just wanted to exclude cases where a word for an object in one language happens to be the word for a place in a different language. That sort of thing would thus better belong in a different thread . Exactly. Just remembered one from my language: Mali - small one It's an adjective, but it us...
by Eugo
Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:07 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Places which are things
Replies: 11
Views: 3402

Places which are things

This could be fun. Let's compile a list of geographical names which are actually common names for things or materials, in any language. Rules: 1) no suffixes (as these would make a distinction between the two words, we want one word), 2) word is used as both a name and a thing in the same language (...
by Eugo
Tue Jan 01, 2013 2:40 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages
Replies: 46
Views: 20952

Re: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages

It depends on what you consider it the middle of. Many consider Monday the start of there week, and if you say Monday through Friday is a work week, then Wednesday is the middle. Some do consider Sunday the start, and most commercial calendars list Sunday on the left. That depends on where you are,...
by Eugo
Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:23 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages
Replies: 46
Views: 20952

Re: Non Base-10 Number Systems in Languages

Our calendar, has 12 months, our day 12 hours times two. The latter annoyed me a lot. I'm so used to the European day, which has 24 hours. Amazingly, I've seen some XIX century posters (for, IIRC, Buffalo Bill's shows) where the times announced were 17:30 and such. Nowadays, the only places where t...
by Eugo
Fri Dec 21, 2012 9:37 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1922
Views: 334182

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Song lyrics and poems can take poetic license with some language use, I think, including not constantly specifying what exactly the streets are below. Then it's a songwriters' conspiracy across at least three decades and several genres. Not one of them has confessed. I'd rather think that after all...
by Eugo
Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:09 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1922
Views: 334182

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

gmalivuk wrote:Is that a common phrase outside of song lyrics?

I'll wait for someone who knows the answer.

But hey, where else would I find phrases to hate?

N.b: Because I avoid advertising, a whole area of language abuse is beyond my scope.
by Eugo
Fri Dec 21, 2012 10:03 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1922
Views: 334182

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

My pet hate for today: "the streets below".

Below what? They never say. The mystery is eating me.
by Eugo
Mon Dec 17, 2012 11:11 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1922
Views: 334182

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

P13808 wrote:Any of the ermagerhd nonsense. Last person who had a joke with that as a punchline, I kicked in the face.

I consider myself lucky that I don't know what are you talking about. Don't explain, I don't want to know.
by Eugo
Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:17 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: "needs fixed" vs. "needs to be fixed"
Replies: 25
Views: 16690

Re: "needs fixed" vs. "needs to be fixed"

Before reading the thread I thought it sounded like one of those weird things they do in British English, like "try and do this" instead of "try to do". I just love that one. My typical response, if I don't think I'll be shot on the spot, is "alright, but may I do this firs...
by Eugo
Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:26 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

It is expected to have false friends among related languages. I was amazed at the amount I found at False Friends of the Slavist. I knew some of these, but even for those I knew I found they had even more different meanings than I thought.
by Eugo
Fri Oct 19, 2012 6:07 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Hyphen, hyphen, where did you go?
Replies: 18
Views: 6227

Re: Hyphen, hyphen, where did you go?

Just yesterday I was reading a novel (the copyright date was 1995) and hit a sentence that badly needed a hyphen. Unfortunately I've forgotten the sentence and can't seem to relocate it, but it was something like "Asturias valiantly defended itself and precariously united Moorish forces, losin...
by Eugo
Mon Oct 15, 2012 1:08 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Hyphen, hyphen, where did you go?
Replies: 18
Views: 6227

Re: Hyphen, hyphen, where did you go?

Is the hyphen really being used less? This could be the recency illusion. Perhaps it is just in what I see posted on Facebook and such, which I will freely admit, that media isn't known as a breeding ground of literacy, but yes, what I have seen has been a decrease in the usage of hyphens.[/quote] ...
by Eugo
Mon Oct 15, 2012 12:58 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Language practice threads
Replies: 144
Views: 106788

Re: Language practice threads [new: Korean]

screen317 wrote:Croatian practice thread anyone?

I'd gladly watch... my croatian is a bit rusty, about 30 years behind the current, and I'd like a refresh cycle. Pozdrav susjedu od komšije :).
by Eugo
Thu Oct 11, 2012 12:14 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

Here's one I still don't understand, and I hear it quite often: "noone seems to care". Does this mean "it seems that nobody cares", or "seem to care" does have some meaning I haven't caught? Or is it just a group of words that became popular as a phrase, a kind of decor...
by Eugo
Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:55 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

I thought "ch" in German was pronounced /x/? Is this a dialectical variation? I think it is (although it's closer to sh in the north, AFAIR, and amazingly, most North Americans learn to pronounce it that way). But when it precedes a s, it's still possible to pronounce it so - but I guess ...
by Eugo
Mon Sep 17, 2012 7:55 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Forum description needs fixing
Replies: 3
Views: 1687

Re: Forum description needs fixing

I like it as it is.
by Eugo
Mon Sep 17, 2012 7:01 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously
Replies: 125
Views: 27064

Re: Literally, Really, Very, Truly, Seriously

Even those blur the lines, though. For example, It is so. is not an incomplete sentence ("It is so... what?"); it means "It is now (or soon will be) the case." An aside here: while I was learning english, the sentence "I love you so." confused me {insert an appropriate...
by Eugo
Sun Aug 26, 2012 8:20 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

But if we include idiomatic phrases whose literal word-for-word translations don't mean the same thing, surely we'd end up just including *all* idioms in *all* languages, wouldn't we? I take that as the royal "we" - I wouldn't relativize that far. I picked only a few of this kind, for whi...
by Eugo
Sat Aug 25, 2012 6:07 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

Serbian posle translates as English after , but I wouldn't say that makes these two words the "same word". And exactly what is the difference in meaning between after all and posle svega ? And how does this pose a trap for translators? Are you saying that posle svega is a loan translation...
by Eugo
Sat Aug 25, 2012 5:07 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

That still makes them false friends. The point is that they are similar in form, usually sharing an etymology, but have different meanings. They use the same words (i.e. the primary meanings of which are equivalent), but the phrases thus coined have different meanings. The main trouble with false f...
by Eugo
Sat Aug 25, 2012 6:54 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

And, of course, I have a list . I'm confused about what after all has to do with posle svega . It appears to be a word-for-word translation, but presumably with a different actual meaning. Though his actual translation of "posle svega" is "when all is said and done", which is pr...
by Eugo
Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:12 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words common to different languages with different meanings
Replies: 69
Views: 28090

Re: Words common to different languages with different meani

Pressed Bunson wrote:In an embarrassing amount of Germanic languages, six is pronounced "sex".


Once upon a time, BMW advertised its 6-cylinder machine as "sexzylinder" :).

And, of course, I have a list.
by Eugo
Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:30 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Annoying words, and Words You Hate
Replies: 1922
Views: 334182

Re: Annoying words, and Words You Hate

Monika wrote:But a hectar is 100 m², not liter/km ... oh wait ...

A hectar is 100x100m, ergo 10000 m². The 100m² is an are
by Eugo
Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:22 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Words you choose to mispronounce
Replies: 242
Views: 79067

Re: Words you choose to mispronounce

Something I choose to pronounce not as the natives do: latin. I pronounce it in classical, as if the vowel shift never happened, -tio never became -shiow, -cia never became -sha, and Caesar never became seezer.
by Eugo
Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:15 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Newspeak practice
Replies: 21
Views: 8170

Re: Newspeak practice

That's all nice, proles, you are getting ahead of yourselves (and any other selves) in this game. I'd just jump in with a real world question: is PC speak a kind of newspeak? The language which went through a political correctional facility has several attributes of a newspeak. It is introduced from...
by Eugo
Tue Jul 31, 2012 6:08 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

This example is pretty interesting to me. In Russian, the equivalent bureaucratic phrase ("cross out [the items that are] not needed") would read «ненужное вычеркнуть» (transliterated as nenuzhnoye vycherknut' ). However, that phrase would not be ambiguous, for two reasons: ⋅  t...
by Eugo
Mon Jul 30, 2012 9:48 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

gmalivuk wrote:Nope, I'm pretty sure that's not what I say.

Probably so. Just an impression I got. May have understood you in a wrong way.
by Eugo
Mon Jul 30, 2012 7:05 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

So then what is your point? I believe I already said that all living languages have ambiguity. In general the more actively used the language, the more potential ambiguity. It's a long standing dispute between gmalivuk and me, where he says there is no ambiguity in english (because the language has...
by Eugo
Mon Jul 30, 2012 12:48 pm UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

I'm bemused that you seem to think the joke in the comic ("...a pig named Wilbur who is saved from being slaughtered by an intelligent spider named Charlotte." - is Charlotte doing the slaughtering or the saving?) relies on the same ambiguity as to whether "I'm dusting x" involv...
by Eugo
Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:23 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

Wlerin wrote:No... like... I'm not going to argue this point further, but the verb dust is just the noun verbed. Anything you can do with dust, or which dust can "do", can be described with the verb "dust".

Which, again, introduces no ambiguity at all, as proven by http://xkcd.com/1087/.
by Eugo
Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:53 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

It's definition 9 that is common when talking about the balance of a bank account. This custom of adding more meanings to a word is what led to this nonsense - that the meaning #9 is a negation of #1. No it's not, they're different things. One refers to a state of equality, the other refers to a di...
by Eugo
Thu Jul 26, 2012 11:03 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

ElWanderer wrote:It's definition 9 that is common when talking about the balance of a bank account.

This custom of adding more meanings to a word is what led to this nonsense - that the meaning #9 is a negation of #1.
by Eugo
Thu Jul 26, 2012 8:49 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

So you didn't immediately think the sheik was touching paper inappropriately before realizing the absurdity and inferring the correct meaning? I know I didn't - I read the comment I quoted before the article. The comment was written by a Canadian (and later commented on by an American, further down...
by Eugo
Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:43 am UTC
Forum: Language/Linguistics
Topic: Nonsensical English...
Replies: 131
Views: 28030

Re: Nonsensical English...

gmalivuk wrote:Since fondling a report just means feeling up some paper, that's not actually ambiguous...

Did I say "ambiguous"? The caption unambiguously gets the wrong meaning across. The article actually mentions a woman instead.

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