Search found 258 matches

by ArmonSore
Sat Nov 22, 2008 3:27 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Point masses
Replies: 8
Views: 1322

Re: Point masses

All of our best tested theories assume that objects are made up of point particles. That's good enough until someone can perform an experiment which can confirm or deny a prediction of some theory that supposes some other shape for elementary particles. (i.e. string theory).
by ArmonSore
Sun Nov 16, 2008 10:02 pm UTC
Forum: Fictional Science
Topic: What is the mass of a feather?
Replies: 229
Views: 315796

Re: What is the mass of a feather?

MotorToad wrote:Have Jesus turn it into wine, then drink it and measure your BAC. Easy peasy.

(Assuming Jesus transmogrifies things according to the laws of thermodynamics.)


Thermodynamics asserts the conservation of energy. It does not assert the conservation of fishes and loaves.
by ArmonSore
Sun Nov 16, 2008 4:28 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Purifying urine
Replies: 18
Views: 3182

Re: Purifying urine

Actually there's a much better use for urine in space:

Russell Schweickart wrote: The most beautiful sight in orbit, or one of the most beautiful sights, is a urine dump at sunset. It's really spectacular.


Source: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 53,00.html
by ArmonSore
Thu Nov 13, 2008 1:45 pm UTC
Forum: Fictional Science
Topic: What is the mass of a feather?
Replies: 229
Views: 315796

Re: What is the mass of a feather?

nazlfrag wrote:You're all missing the obvious solution.

Just ask the bird.


Birds are notorious lieing liars.
by ArmonSore
Wed Oct 29, 2008 3:27 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Weight VS. Mass
Replies: 29
Views: 3404

Re: Weight VS. Mass

And here I thought the definition of weight was "what the scale reads".
by ArmonSore
Tue Aug 12, 2008 2:17 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Can light be bent?
Replies: 46
Views: 5455

Re: Can light be bent?

Sweet, it's just as I hoped it would be.
by ArmonSore
Mon Aug 11, 2008 7:46 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Can light be bent?
Replies: 46
Views: 5455

Re: Can light be bent?

I don't have too much intuition about geometric optics where the material has a smooth gradient for the index of refraction, so I'm guessing here. From your graph it would seem to me that at the boundary n changes from 1 to some large number (10?). Then as the light moves down the material the value...
by ArmonSore
Sun Jul 06, 2008 1:08 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The possibility of bullet-bending -- WANTED
Replies: 49
Views: 9716

Re: The possibility of bullet-bending -- WANTED

I think the pieces on Wanted where 'wings of flies were shot off', and where 'bullets were counter-fired at each other and collided directly head-on', would make one awesomely epic Mythbusters episode. I think those sections didn't break the laws of physics that much. The bullet-bending might be a ...
by ArmonSore
Sun Jun 29, 2008 2:16 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Physics careers
Replies: 13
Views: 2107

Re: Physics careers

Be very careful when the advice says "A degree in X is great for a career in Y!" Things change. We were fed that line as undergrads--degrees in physics are versatile, you can find jobs as an engineer or working in finance. Well, it turns out that jobs in engineering for physics students U...
by ArmonSore
Wed Jun 18, 2008 12:34 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Twin paradox: a question
Replies: 18
Views: 4115

Re: Twin paradox: a question

the tein paradox cant be fully described using special relativity, you need general relativity. as stated above, the real trickery happens when the traveling twin TURNS AROUND (i.e. accelerates) if he just kept rocketing off and never came home, it is indeterminate which is older and which is young...
by ArmonSore
Sun Jun 15, 2008 3:48 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Science fiction weapons
Replies: 126
Views: 12233

Re: Science fiction weapons

Basically, you take a big lump of neutronium, and an equally big lump of antinutronuim. Just to be sure we're on the same page: Neutronium refers to matter compressed so far that protons and electrons can't remain separate, so they combine into neutrons. Plus the neutrons already present in the ori...
by ArmonSore
Sat Jun 14, 2008 10:04 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Favorite Scientist?
Replies: 84
Views: 8598

Re: Favorite Scientist?

I went with Archimedes. He figured out many results from calculus, discovered his principle in hydrostatics, and the laws of pulleys and levers without any of the advantages that Newton had.

Also: Ack! The avatar I've been using has been bamboozled!
by ArmonSore
Wed May 21, 2008 3:04 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Kinetic Energy...
Replies: 3
Views: 1658

Re: Kinetic Energy...

It's no coincidence. The partial derivative of kinetic energy with respect to velocity is momentum. Similarly the partial derivative of a potential energy function with respect to distance is the force that is associated with the potential. Using these two facts we can create a beautiful reformulati...
by ArmonSore
Tue May 13, 2008 1:58 am UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Offend a moderator
Replies: 226
Views: 23722

Re: Offend a moderator

Hey. I've heard somewhere that 0.99999... = 1

But this doesn't make any sense! Could someone explain it to me?
by ArmonSore
Mon Mar 31, 2008 1:38 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: if special relatvity is true...
Replies: 29
Views: 3961

Re: if special relatvity is true...

That is really the true paradox for me. The fact is, if one frame is inertial to the other, there is no special frame, so people in both frames see time going slower in the other frame. You might ask, how can time go slower in both frames compared to the other? I guess the only answer is in order f...
by ArmonSore
Sat Mar 22, 2008 6:18 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: What derivative of displacement can change instantaneously?
Replies: 47
Views: 4425

Re: What derivative of displacement can change instantaneously?

Dirac delta certainly isn't a function from R1 --> R1. But it still looks like a function to me.
by ArmonSore
Mon Mar 17, 2008 11:51 am UTC
Forum: Individual XKCD Comic Threads
Topic: 0397: "Unscientific"
Replies: 160
Views: 38514

Re: "Unscientific" Discussion

Was Zombie Feynman the one stealing all of those girls?
by ArmonSore
Sun Mar 09, 2008 5:19 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Gravity affecting energy not mass
Replies: 16
Views: 3784

Re: Gravity effecting energy not mass

Ok supposing I was right in the first place, what implications would it have for a grand unified theory or string theory? This is actually the biggest roadblock on the path towards GUT, as I understand it. Since energy and mass are equivalent, gravitons have mass(just like photons). Hence gravitons...
by ArmonSore
Fri Feb 29, 2008 1:19 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: E=MC^2
Replies: 22
Views: 3457

Re: E=MC^2

Imagine if by some accident of history we were to measure the x-direction of space in meters and the y-direction of space in inches. And even worse, we defined the magnitude of the displacement vector to be in meters. Everyone in this bizarro world would wonder why pythagoreas theorem is so hard. Th...
by ArmonSore
Wed Feb 20, 2008 10:27 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Only a Theory
Replies: 39
Views: 5995

Re: Only a Theory

How is gravity a theory? It's an observable physical phenomena!
by ArmonSore
Tue Jan 22, 2008 1:08 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Schrodinger's Cat
Replies: 35
Views: 4107

Re: Schrodinger's Cat

NagnaZul wrote:What would the 4th spatial dimension be called?

And what would it feel like if we COULD move about in that dimension?


Wouldn't symmetry under rotation imply that it would feel exactly the same?
by ArmonSore
Mon Jan 21, 2008 8:39 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Does gravity stop the universe from expanding?
Replies: 8
Views: 1622

Re: Does gravity stop the universe from expanding?

I'm not sure this question can be answered at all until we understand more about dark energy.
by ArmonSore
Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:42 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Dimensionality of gravity
Replies: 24
Views: 2611

Re: Dimensionality of gravity

You have to be careful what you mean by velocity! First let's get out of the way that there are for dimensions in spacetime. x, y, z, and c*t. Now then, on to types of velocities: There's the four-velocity, which is a derivative of all four dimensions respect to the object's proper time. That's the ...
by ArmonSore
Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:32 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Dimensionality of gravity
Replies: 24
Views: 2611

Re: Dimensionality of gravity

Does 'moving through spacetime at c' imply (x 2 +y 2 +z 2 +t 2 ) 1/2 = c? how would that work out anyways since the units would be (m 2 +s 2 ) 1/2 = m/s? This is exactly the problem with Brian Greene's presentation! This occurs when all of its light-speed motion through time is diverted into light-...
by ArmonSore
Sat Jan 12, 2008 9:27 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: What is the probability of our existence?
Replies: 52
Views: 4751

Re: What is the probability of our existence?

No! This is a critically important principle, and if you misunderstand it, you're going to do poor science. Ironically, I'm going to split hairs on this particular statement. I don't really want to call what we're doing in this particular thread science. The actual question before us is the probabi...
by ArmonSore
Sat Jan 12, 2008 6:18 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: What is the probability of our existence?
Replies: 52
Views: 4751

Re: What is the probability of our existence?

Yes, but it's also the only valid answer to this question, philosophically. It makes no sense to talk of the probability of something which you know has happened - as humanity has happened, it therefore makes no sense to talk of the probability of humanity coming to exist. What you probably mean is...
by ArmonSore
Mon Jan 07, 2008 5:32 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Time reversal and second law of thermodynamics
Replies: 29
Views: 3490

Re: Time reversal and second law of thermodynamics

Are you implying that a gas made out of antimatter (let's say an anti-matter equivalent of H 2 ) would somehow move away from the macrostate with highest multiplicity, rather than towards it? I think he has a very large misunderstanding of virtual particles. What does virtual particles have to do w...
by ArmonSore
Mon Jan 07, 2008 1:24 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Time reversal and second law of thermodynamics
Replies: 29
Views: 3490

Re: Time reversal and second law of thermodynamics

Are you implying that a gas made out of antimatter (let's say an anti-matter equivalent of H2) would somehow move away from the macrostate with highest multiplicity, rather than towards it?
by ArmonSore
Sat Jan 05, 2008 5:50 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Dimentions question
Replies: 9
Views: 1252

Re: Dimentions question

According to special relativity energy is simply momentum through time (with a factor of c thrown in somewhere). Wouldn't two dimensional time mean two dimensional energy? What would that imply?
by ArmonSore
Sat Jan 05, 2008 5:44 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Time reversal and second law of thermodynamics
Replies: 29
Views: 3490

Re: Time reversal and second law of thermodynamics

Incidentally, what's that have to do with time reversal? The second law is often referred to as "time's arrow", since it ensures that a certain process goes one way, and never the other way. If you could break the second law then you could send every process that has ever occurred into re...
by ArmonSore
Fri Jan 04, 2008 3:29 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Miscellaneous Science Questions
Replies: 2870
Views: 658126

Re: Common Questions

The only change that I'd make (that didn't come at the cost of brevity) is that everything is both a particle and a wave. Electrons, protons, neutrinos, etc. Not just photons.
by ArmonSore
Sun Dec 30, 2007 4:51 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: antigravity!
Replies: 25
Views: 3109

Re: antigravity!

All joking aside, what types of phenomena should we actually call "antigravity", if anything?

Clearly the moon isn't anymore an "antigravity device" than the chair I'm sitting in.
by ArmonSore
Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:16 am UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Calculus Final Exam; Applied Calc
Replies: 21
Views: 2957

Re: Calculus Final Exam; Applied Calc

Here's the problem you should solve: Your friend in paris really loves chocolate, but doesn't have any! So you decide to take a big cannon and fire said chocolate to said friend at said location. Calculate the speed and direction you would need to fire said chocolate at, in order for it to reach you...
by ArmonSore
Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:07 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Universe inside a ball MiB-style and shake it,do we feel it?
Replies: 9
Views: 2177

Re: Universe inside a ball MiB-style and shake it,do we feel it?

Of course we'd feel it. We'd all be dragged along with the Aether.
by ArmonSore
Fri Dec 14, 2007 1:31 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Simple physic problem... or is it?
Replies: 3
Views: 1278

Re: Simple physic problem... or is it?

You're crazy! (no offense) That equation is newton's second law for the block. The angular acceleration comes in because we know the rope is not slipping, which gives us that angular acceleration*R = tangential acceleration. In order to solve the whole problem you have to do a Newton's second law eq...
by ArmonSore
Fri Nov 16, 2007 1:04 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Surfer with a new theory of everything?
Replies: 39
Views: 5345

Re: Surfer with a new theory of everything?

Theoretical physics needs more papers like this. Also it does not appear to be a supersymmetric theory. If LHC finds sparticles this theory is likely incorrect while a lack of sparticles could be seen to support work like this. I see nothing wrong with this. We already have too many theories that a...
by ArmonSore
Fri Nov 16, 2007 1:01 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Are physical constants rational?
Replies: 158
Views: 13231

Re: Are physical constants rational?

Yes. Although, ignoring uniqueness conditions, we can get away with what I'm saying making sense under weaker conditions of the power series matching at at least one point. As long as they match at at least one point, you can compare the physical constants in the old theory with the taylor constant...
by ArmonSore
Fri Nov 16, 2007 4:33 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Are physical constants rational?
Replies: 158
Views: 13231

Re: Are physical constants rational?

Well, since we can write down a theory, the series expansion exists at least where we've measured it to work, thus the constant can be determined exactly by the series expansion about any point where terms of the series expansion are equal to what our approximate theory says, and the series converg...
by ArmonSore
Thu Nov 15, 2007 2:59 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Are physical constants rational?
Replies: 158
Views: 13231

Re: Are physical constants rational?

But the question that I'm asking about is whether or not the mathematics is independent of what we measure. Certainly physical phenomena exists independent of what we observe. No one would question that. But my question is whether we are simply making associations between mathematics and phenomena,...
by ArmonSore
Wed Nov 14, 2007 4:28 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Are physical constants rational?
Replies: 158
Views: 13231

Re: Are physical constants rational?

Ah, I now understand a little bit better what you meant before by your statements. But I also can't help but feel that you haven't addressed the point that I am making. I used the idea of the wrong theory giving some right ideas as an argument about what I'm really getting at. As I said, I didn't ev...

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