Search found 190 matches

by parallax
Mon Aug 27, 2007 4:05 am UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Mornington Crescent
Replies: 2713
Views: 285498

I see no reason to stray from my original line of play, so I'll continue with West Kensington . It should allow me a diagonal volley into the center of the board. It also shuts down any contravariant moves up the west bank. I might expect a truffle-shuffle countermove, but there are contingencies fo...
by parallax
Fri Aug 24, 2007 12:21 am UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Mornington Crescent
Replies: 2713
Views: 285498

I'll go ahead and play the northern variation of the Hapsburg opening: Russell Square. This should give me some flexibility in the mid-game to adapt my strategy.
by parallax
Thu Aug 23, 2007 6:10 pm UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Mornington Crescent
Replies: 2713
Views: 285498

This seems like a good place to jump in. The board is fairly unbalanced, so I can gain some quick ground. I'm going to play Victoria Line, retrograde. It's never failed the Germans.
by parallax
Thu Aug 23, 2007 5:26 pm UTC
Forum: Logic Puzzles
Topic: Fill the cube
Replies: 22
Views: 4406

Re: Fill the cube

Imagine a solid of some arbitrary size. You are allowed to place points anywhere within the solid , including the faces. Find a distribution of points such that: 1). It is impossible to specify a plane which separates the solid into two volumes, one which contains all of the points, and one which c...
by parallax
Wed Aug 22, 2007 8:33 pm UTC
Forum: Logic Puzzles
Topic: Fill the cube
Replies: 22
Views: 4406

solution to this wrote:Cosmologicon is correct. The original problem is obviously 8, and the perpendicular solution is 4. A plane perpendicular to a side necessarily contains 2 adjacent corners of the cube, so it is sufficient to mark every odd corner. The equivalent solutions for a hypercube are 16 and 8.
by parallax
Mon Aug 20, 2007 3:38 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Gravity in the earth.
Replies: 29
Views: 5566

At the surface. To see this, imagine a smaller earth contained inside Earth directly beneath your feet. It is wholly contained in the Earth, so the additional mass of the Earth can only increase gravity. Of course, the Earth doesn't have constant gravity, so it's possible that gravity is higher when...
by parallax
Thu Aug 16, 2007 4:23 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Physics Laws
Replies: 44
Views: 5984

Negative inertia. Would this mean that objects at rest tend to start moving and objects in motion tend to come to rest (all without any outside influence)? This produces a paradox; specifically, that objects at rest start moving and immediately want to return to rest then immediately begin to move,...
by parallax
Fri Aug 10, 2007 3:58 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Velociraptors through space
Replies: 18
Views: 3360

I was assuming that the platform was sufficiently massive that the velocity of the platform with respect to the center of mass of the system was negligible, yet not massive enough to impart significant gravitational effects.
by parallax
Fri Aug 10, 2007 2:38 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: So Sad
Replies: 58
Views: 9123

I find, when trying to work some of the harder multiplications in my head, it helps to "write" the numbers in the air with my finger. It lets me use my visual memory to store the numbers rather than my "word" memory.
by parallax
Fri Aug 10, 2007 2:41 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Velociraptors through space
Replies: 18
Views: 3360

Its actually a bit more than that, because some of the force you exert while jumping goes into raising your body from a crouch into a complete standing position, and that force would also propel you forward in the absence of gravity. But that's probably pretty close - it is at least equal to your v...
by parallax
Sun Aug 05, 2007 5:52 pm UTC
Forum: Logic Puzzles
Topic: And I Thought a Rubik's Cube was Tough
Replies: 13
Views: 5024

The movements are correct. It's easy to see if you only rotate the center cube, and watch where all the other faces are connected to it. The confusing part is just that a cubic cell has many more symmetries than a square face.
by parallax
Sat Aug 04, 2007 4:42 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Is time continuous?
Replies: 12
Views: 3938

When in doubt, assume that something will be quantized, and we just haven't determined it yet. Remember: God made the integers; everything else is the work of man.
by parallax
Sat Aug 04, 2007 4:34 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Percentage of reals rational
Replies: 74
Views: 12705

Yes, but you need an infinite number of bits to specify a real number. Thus, your experiment would take an infinite time to complete.
by parallax
Fri Aug 03, 2007 4:36 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Should women go to jail?
Replies: 115
Views: 13120

My point was, I don't believe people should be punished for breaking the law if that law is unjust. Since I believe a law against abortion would be unjust, I am unable to specify a punishment for breaking it. Because I don't believe anyone should be punished for committing abortion. If there were a ...
by parallax
Fri Aug 03, 2007 4:10 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Avogadro's Number
Replies: 27
Views: 6049

It's more like the requirement of having an integral number of atoms means you can't make a perfect sphere. Realistically, I don't know that it really matters that much, since you're unlikely to have a perfect cube either. However, I think the "roundest object in the world" is pretty cool.
by parallax
Fri Aug 03, 2007 3:54 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Should women go to jail?
Replies: 115
Views: 13120

Thank you for bringing up this question. I've never thought about this issue from that angle before. Logically, the only answer someone who is pro-choice can give to the question "What should the punishment be for abortion?" is "nothing". We had a thread a while back on jury null...
by parallax
Thu Aug 02, 2007 6:10 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Get the Supersoaker - "Free Will"
Replies: 226
Views: 24739

While I agree on a practical level, especially since I don't believe it possible to completely prove or disprove free will (as we do not have the prerequisite perfect knowledge to either eliminate free will or prove it's existence), I'm still talking about the hypothetical. How does someone who doe...
by parallax
Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:59 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Get the Supersoaker - "Free Will"
Replies: 226
Views: 24739

The lightning bolt is a red herring, it doesn't add anything to the example, it only makes it more complicated by adding another step... the lightning bolt is exactly the same as the cup in terms of causality. And the human mind is also a red herring, it doesn't add anything to the example; it only...
by parallax
Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:51 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Avogadro's Number
Replies: 27
Views: 6049

It's interesting that even that recent version doesn't really have that many significant figures... Well it would be pretty silly to define Avogadro's number with heaps and heaps of significant figures. Who would that benefit? Everyone. The 'accurate' version could be off by around 1000000000000000...
by parallax
Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:46 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Halo and Maths
Replies: 9
Views: 2651

That thread was entertaining for the complete lack of math knowledge. Anyway, there's nothing to solve, as the equation is clearly incomplete. It's seems like a portion of either a statistical equation or a quantum mechanical equation, although I wouldn't rule out other fields such as electromagneti...
by parallax
Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Get the Supersoaker - "Free Will"
Replies: 226
Views: 24739

Choice is solely about whether or not the mind has the capability of being a causal agent. So the lightning bolt that caused the mug to fall off the table has free will, because it caused something? And if a basic NOT gate is your argument against determinism, are you concluding that the NOT gate h...
by parallax
Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:44 pm UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Man Law
Replies: 259
Views: 30978

The California Legislature are girlie-men.
by parallax
Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:28 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Get the Supersoaker - "Free Will"
Replies: 226
Views: 24739

The difference between a cup and a sentient being is that getting angry at a cup is not likely to change it's behavior. Getting angry at a person will. A cup is going to fall off the table whether you get angry at it or not, but a person is less likely to punch you if they think you will get angry a...
by parallax
Tue Jul 31, 2007 5:47 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: An interesting little math riddle...
Replies: 11
Views: 5451

You can solve it incrementally, although this doesn't guarantee an efficient solution (in terms of the highest weight measurable with a given number of rocks). If you only have one rock, it should be one pound. This allows you to weigh up to one pound of rock. If given another rock, you would want a...
by parallax
Tue Jul 31, 2007 2:38 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: What is hell? Designated 'Hell' Topic
Replies: 90
Views: 12764

I think the most important part of any Hell would have to be the hope that you could one day escape. Without that, I think you would eventually just get used to whatever torture or boredom you were subject to.

All I know is, I'd rather be in Hell than be in Heaven knowing there were people in Hell.
by parallax
Tue Jul 31, 2007 2:29 pm UTC
Forum: Serious Business
Topic: Get the Supersoaker - "Free Will"
Replies: 226
Views: 24739

Maybe the reason I believe so strongly in free will is that life is so completely pointless without it and, to this point, I have yet to find much of anything about life pointless. There would be no reason for me to be here. No reason for me to make decisions. I shouldn't be in school. I shouldn't ...
by parallax
Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:08 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Lets fix global warming.
Replies: 239
Views: 23303

About seeding clouds with seawater: water vapor is also a greenhouse gas. As far as I'm aware nobody actually knows exactly how clouds affect global warming, since clouds both increase albedo reflection and increase the greenhouse effect.
by parallax
Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:44 am UTC
Forum: Logic Puzzles
Topic: Infinite money!..Sort of.
Replies: 72
Views: 12256

Another problem with this type of game is that $2 million isn't really twice as useful as $1 million. Expected value is not always the best way to analyze games because people aren't rational money-EV maximizers. For example, I wouldn't take a 50-50 bet to lose/gain $10,000 because owing someone $10...
by parallax
Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:38 am UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: most efficient base for prime number searching
Replies: 9
Views: 3036

The best number representation for finding prime numbers would be to store them as their unique prime factorization. Then, telling whether a number is prime or not is a constant-time operation. Obviously, this approach is not very practical because the representation is not very efficient for anythi...
by parallax
Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:29 am UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Grade calculation question
Replies: 13
Views: 2466

Kalak_z wrote:You can also make an estimate at the correlation. It would be safe to assume that the correlation coefficient, rho is between .8 and .9.


Citation Needed.

See also: 78% of statistics are made up on the spot.
by parallax
Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:27 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: The usage of "minute" as a unit of distance?
Replies: 28
Views: 8823

The minute (time) is probably the most useful measurement of distance when it comes to making plans with people who drive or walk. I never check my odometer before going over to my friend's house, but I know it takes me about 15-20 minutes to get there.
by parallax
Sat Jul 21, 2007 8:02 pm UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Maybe even more fun than making big numbers
Replies: 14
Views: 5816

Are we allowed to assume the prime numbers are closed under multiplication?
by parallax
Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:13 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Stupid classifications
Replies: 8
Views: 2355

Too bad apes and monkeys are fairly different types of primate.
by parallax
Mon Jul 16, 2007 4:33 am UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Primary colours.
Replies: 78
Views: 9531

Mantis Shrimp FTW. They have a ridiculable number of different photoreceptors, including some for differentiation of polarized light.
by parallax
Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:40 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Interesting problem. Anyone want to have a go?
Replies: 28
Views: 4094

Well, for n=1, the solution is clearly a line centered at the origin. For, n=2, the solutions start as circles centered at the origin, until the line reaches length 2*pi/3, at which point, increasing the size of the curve allows for larger circles inside it. So on end of the curve needs to extend in...
by parallax
Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:32 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: "Water is not compressible, you cant sqeeze water...&qu
Replies: 47
Views: 15146

Our current theories regard subatomic particles as either point masses or one-dimensional strings, neither of which have volume. The reason electrons don't become black holes is because Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity don't play nice together. It's also possible that the very concepts of &q...
by parallax
Sat Jul 14, 2007 2:17 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: why is CO2 a non organic compund?
Replies: 54
Views: 8692

"Organic" and "inorganic" aren't really physical distinctions. Their just categories chemists use to classify chemicals. "Organic" typically refers to molecules with carbon-carbon bonds, although methane and it's derivatives can fall in this category as well. Bees make ...
by parallax
Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:53 pm UTC
Forum: Forum Games
Topic: Five letters
Replies: 1348
Views: 119017

XKCD-reading Xenophobes Xerox Xylophone X-rays

A B C D E
by parallax
Thu Jul 12, 2007 7:10 pm UTC
Forum: Mathematics
Topic: Percentage of reals rational
Replies: 74
Views: 12705

Are there random number generator methods that favor rationals but that will possibly pick any real (or any real in a given interval at least)? Sure there are. Here's one: For simplicity, let's just work with [0,1]. The rationals in this interval are countable, so assume that the complete list of r...
by parallax
Thu Jul 12, 2007 6:57 pm UTC
Forum: Science
Topic: Question about degenerate, commuting operators in QM
Replies: 6
Views: 5416

The GS procedure simply orthogonalizes your vectors, it doesn't affect their eigenvalues (and hence their degeneracy) at all.

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