IDE Suggestions?

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Princess Marzipan
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IDE Suggestions?

Postby Princess Marzipan » Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:24 am UTC

Anybody have suggestions for free IDEs that I can use for Java or C/C++?

I need to flex my atrophied coding muscles but I'm not sure what I should use to develop my code.
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Postby iw » Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:29 am UTC

emacs

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Postby EvanED » Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:37 am UTC

For Java, Eclipse rules. For C++, try the Visual Studio 2005 Express editions if you're on Windows.

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Postby ubergeek42 » Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:44 am UTC

I've used eclipse, its pretty good, a tad slow to load, and you need a plugin for c/c++ code.
KDevelop? never used it, but I assume its better then just a text editor.(assuming you are in linux)
I think there are free versions of visual studio(for C++ code anyways)
Back in high school we used Jcreator for java development, it's not that bad, and theres also netbeans for java code, though I never spent the time learning how to use it properly.

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Postby Rysto » Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:49 am UTC

For Java, I prefer Netbeans. I've yet to find a good free IDE for C++ -- I resort to using a text editor that can do syntax highlighting and running make and the program itself from the command line.

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Postby melchior » Mon Jun 11, 2007 3:31 am UTC

Vim + command line. IDE's are nice unless you actually want to edit text.

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Postby EvanED » Mon Jun 11, 2007 3:35 am UTC

melchior wrote:Vim + command line. IDE's are nice unless you actually want to edit text.


I would respond in a similarly somewhat tongue-in-cheek manner by saying that editors are nice unless you actually want to edit or understand code. ;-)

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Postby melchior » Mon Jun 11, 2007 3:45 am UTC

EvanED wrote:
melchior wrote:Vim + command line. IDE's are nice unless you actually want to edit text.


I would respond in a similarly somewhat tongue-in-cheek manner by saying that editors are nice unless you actually want to edit or understand code. ;-)


Oh yea? Well another reason to use Vim is that you can impress the females by editing code by bashing keys in a seemingly random manner. Try doing that with visual studios.

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Postby Princess Marzipan » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:06 am UTC

Rysto wrote:For Java, I prefer Netbeans. I've yet to find a good free IDE for C++ -- I resort to using a text editor that can do syntax highlighting and running make and the program itself from the command line.


Actually, I think syntax highlighting is really all I'd need. I was coddled by IDEs through college, so learning through them again would probably be a less than optimal plan.

I take it Vim will take care of that much for me?
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Postby adlaiff6 » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:18 am UTC

Vim is awesome.

Eclipse is great if you want a full-on IDE, and it has a C/C++ plugin (did people forget that?) called CDT.
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Postby EvanED » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:28 am UTC

CreemyNougat wrote:
Rysto wrote:For Java, I prefer Netbeans. I've yet to find a good free IDE for C++ -- I resort to using a text editor that can do syntax highlighting and running make and the program itself from the command line.


Actually, I think syntax highlighting is really all I'd need. I was coddled by IDEs through college, so learning through them again would probably be a less than optimal plan.

I take it Vim will take care of that much for me?


Emacs and Vim will both give you syntax highlighting.

adlaiff6 wrote:Vim is awesome.

Eclipse is great if you want a full-on IDE, and it has a C/C++ plugin (did people forget that?) called CDT.


Yeah, but CDT doesn't give you most of the things that made Eclipse for Java stand out in my mind, like refactoring support. Not that I'm sure what IDE *does* give you that for C++, besides xrefactory.

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Postby Princess Marzipan » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:29 am UTC

I think I'll go with Vim.

It'll force me to understand what the hell's going on, and bonus points, rhymes with Zim!

Thanks for the input. (Was that a pun?)
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iw
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Postby iw » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:35 am UTC

melchior wrote:Oh yea? Well another reason to use Vim is that you can impress the females by editing code by bashing keys in a seemingly random manner. Try doing that with visual studios.


"Hey baby, I just did a global regexp search and replace and wrote a macro on the fly... you like that, don'tcha? Now I'm entering Insert Mode..."
Last edited by iw on Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:38 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Earlz » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:37 am UTC

I'd have to say Code::Blocks is the best IDE(alongside with Minw compiler) I've used..
http://codeblocks.org just make sure to use a nightly build..(the RC2 sucks and is like a year old!)

do NOT use DevC++...it really is just a murder of an IDE..
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Postby djn » Mon Jun 11, 2007 9:15 am UTC

It's wimpy (I mean, it has a GUI), but I like kate. Syntax highlighting, neat file list (color coded to show the order you last looked at the files in), integrated shell. The optional word completion plugin is stupid (looks at the first three letters, suggest everything starting with them), yet still oddly useful.

Oh, and you can get a minimal command line to type sed-style replacement regexps and other things if you want.

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Postby taylor_venable » Mon Jun 11, 2007 4:16 pm UTC

Ed is the standard editor.

http://www.gnu.org/fun/jokes/ed.msg.html

:D
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Postby plams » Sun Jun 17, 2007 4:03 pm UTC

I've been a vim user for a long time, but Eclipse won me over when it comes to writing Java. Its way of assisting the programmer is unparallelled in anything else I've seen, including Visual Studio.

E.g. you write

Code: Select all

Foo bar = new Foo(1,2,3);
bar.baz("asdf");
something = 6;


Eclipse will highlight the Foo's because you havn't written the class yet. But just move your cursor over the second Foo and press ctrl+1 - Eclipse will help you make a class stub for Foo with a constructor taking 3 ints. Do the ctrl+1 dance on baz and it will offer to make a baz method in Foo taking a String as argument. Ctrl+1 on something will offer you to make either a local variable or a member variable.

This not only saves you from a lot of tedious typing, but also invites you to do test-first development (which normally can be somewhat tedious) since you can write the "user code" first and Eclipse will show what needs to be resolved before the code compiles.

Besides ctrl+1, Eclipse's auto-completion, refactoring tools, code reflection and debugger are veeeery nice. I miss my vim interface sometimes, but I honestly think that vim will give me carpal tunnel syndrome long before Eclipse when it comes to Java development.

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Postby plams » Sun Jun 17, 2007 4:04 pm UTC

double post sorry

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Postby Elevator_Hazard » Sun Jun 17, 2007 8:52 pm UTC

Code::Blocks... Its great, Earlz introduced me to it, but I didn't use a nightly build :? maybe I should get a nightly... I wish I could get one for Linux Ubuntu 7.04 though, but Anjuta does the job for the linux, I guess.
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Postby mqarcus » Wed Jun 20, 2007 12:57 pm UTC

I read (somewhere) that MSVC++ 2005 Express needs runtime libraries and all that jazz to execute the program... And it's free, from Microsoft. Come on, there's gotta be a catch.

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Postby Rysto » Wed Jun 20, 2007 1:38 pm UTC

mqarcus wrote:I read (somewhere) that MSVC++ 2005 Express needs runtime libraries and all that jazz to execute the program... And it's free, from Microsoft. Come on, there's gotta be a catch.

Easy. They want people to learn how to program on Windows using Visual Studio, so when they get a job, they want to develop for Windows using Visual Studio.

It's the same reason they offer deep discounts on Office to schools.

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Postby EvanED » Wed Jun 20, 2007 3:25 pm UTC

Rysto wrote:
mqarcus wrote:I read (somewhere) that MSVC++ 2005 Express needs runtime libraries and all that jazz to execute the program... And it's free, from Microsoft. Come on, there's gotta be a catch.

Easy. They want people to learn how to program on Windows using Visual Studio, so when they get a job, they want to develop for Windows using Visual Studio.

It's the same reason they offer deep discounts on Office to schools.


Exactly. Students in many CS programs can get stuff like Visual Studio Pro, Windows, ... for "free" from MS. (There's a nominal cost to the department, but it's pretty small and won't go away if you don't take advantage of it.)

I call it the drug dealer marketing plan. The first hit's free.

(This doesn't mean of course that I haven't gotten two, and soon to be three versions of Windows and two versions of VS Pro from it. ;-))

So no, there's not a catch in the traditional sense. (Well, do the express editions forbid commercial development?)

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Postby aldimond » Wed Jun 20, 2007 3:39 pm UTC

I'm not really an expert on this, but I don't think that the "express" versions forbid commercial development.

Both the "express" and full versions have support for user-written extensions. However, recently Microsoft sued somebody for creating a useful extension and making it available to "express" users.

I think that's probably all one needs to know about express versions. You can't argue with a free cruise, even if you're being pitched timeshares, and if you'll... get sued... for performing services for the other guests... that would make the cruise more fun and thus compete with the timeshares themselves ... ... ? OK, analogy taken too far.
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Postby mqarcus » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:40 pm UTC

But apart from not being able to develop commercial software (which is not my goal), would you recommend MSVC++ Express?

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Postby EvanED » Wed Jun 20, 2007 5:00 pm UTC

Personally, I'm a fan of Visual Studio, including the Express Editions. I don't have a lot of exposure to the alternatives besides emacs+tags+grep (and Eclipse for Java) though.

For C or C++, I would recommend the express editions. You just have to keep in mind that it is MS's attempt to hook people, and they have some measure of desire to not make the environment *too* rich, which results in stuff like the TestDriven.NET crap.

For Java, I recommend Eclipse. It's a bit bloated and slow, but it's so nice in just about every other respect that it far makes up for it.

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Postby Manix » Fri Jun 22, 2007 5:20 pm UTC

Visual Studio .NET is, hands down, the best C++ IDE on the planet. This is a blessing and a curse, because this awesomeness will inevitably make you a weaker programmer(not significantly, but this is something to note, if you have aspirations of being hardcore).

The only difference between normal and express is that, as mentioned, no extensions for express. Also, in express, you can only compile in debug mode, not in release mode(which sucks if you're making games, because the framerate typically triples in release mode).

For Java, Eclipse has pretty much overtaken every other IDE.

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Postby bavardage » Fri Jun 22, 2007 6:42 pm UTC

Manix wrote:Also, in express, you can only compile in debug mode, not in release mode(which sucks if you're making games, because the framerate typically triples in release mode).


Hmm I am currently coding a HL2DM mod with said express edition, and appear to be able to compile in release mode.
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Postby necroforest » Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:24 pm UTC

iw wrote:emacs


%g++ -x c++ -
...
% ./a.out

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Postby Hockeypuck » Sat Jul 07, 2007 4:24 pm UTC

I've really just began to scratch the surface of coding, but I do like the Visual Studio IDE. Debugging in it makes me feel like I'm cheating though :)

iw
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Postby iw » Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:49 pm UTC

necroforest wrote:
iw wrote:emacs


%g++ -x c++ -
...
% ./a.out

You're right, bash is a close second.

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Postby Sc4Freak » Thu Jul 12, 2007 4:58 am UTC

If you're on Windows, I'd say Visual Studio 2005 Express Edition. It's simply a superior IDE. I'm particularly fond of its debugging features, and it's free.

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Postby Arancaytar » Thu Jul 12, 2007 9:24 am UTC

I've become an Eclipse fan. Besides Java, I use it for PHP as well; I like the way it works with version control systems (CVS natively, SVN with a plugin) too, as well as the Ant tool.

For FORTRAN (which I hardly ever write in), I use vi, which amplifies the experience. I mean, if you're going to use FORTRAN in order to feel like a tough, old-school programmer, you may as well do it properly*.

*"Properly" would involve punch cards, actually, but, well. :P

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Postby DarkTimes » Sat Jul 14, 2007 8:51 am UTC

I use Code::Blocks, but I have to say VS has the best debugger. Well that I've used. I do like the MinGW compiler though.

Also you can compile VS Express apps for release and you can use them for commercial development. As I understand the main limitations are on things like source control and plugins.

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Postby Amnesiasoft » Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:25 am UTC

DarkTimes wrote:As I understand the main limitations are on things like source control and plugins.

I believe the debugger is also a little watered down, but it's still better than GDB, if you ask me.


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