suggestions for computer science books

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jasperlevink
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suggestions for computer science books

Postby jasperlevink » Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:11 am UTC

Dear all,
I already have several years of programming experience. I learned myself most of the things I know.

But, while my programs get more and more advanced, I more and more find out I do lag on programming techniques. The only technique I ever learned is binary search. Last week someone told me about tail-recursion, a technique I never heard about before but turned out to be very usefull..

I would like to learn more techniques to make my programs more efficient! Of course experience is the main ingredient, but I think there should be a book somewhere that can get me on my way.

So hopefully you can help me to find a book that can help me get a little more advanced in programming.

I think these books are most of the time written for a certain language. I prefer C++, but other languages like Java are no problem.

Thank you very much and with kind regards,
Jasper

EDIT: What about this set: Amazon link

TraumaPony
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby TraumaPony » Mon Mar 31, 2008 12:46 pm UTC

These books are excellent, in my opinion:

  • Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. This is in Scheme, but it's not about the language, it's about the theory etc
  • The Art of Computer Programming. This is seminal. It's in assembler, but again, it's not about the language, it's about the theory
  • Code Complete. This is good for best practices, etc, for software construction. It's more about the implementation, but it's still excellent.
  • I've also heard that this is excellent, as well. It's C++.

!xobile
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby !xobile » Tue Apr 01, 2008 4:38 am UTC

TraumaPony wrote:this is excellent, as well. It's C++.


I have a couple books out of this series and would highly recommend them as well. I found them extremely useful for some of my CS classes as well as independent study type of material.

The Art of Computer Programming is extremely dense and can be really difficult to read, but it explains every little detail you might ever want to know about practically ... everything.

jasperlevink
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby jasperlevink » Tue Apr 01, 2008 5:03 am UTC

I think the Art of computing is what I am looking for!
Thank you very much!
There are different volumes and different fascicles. Should I just start at volume 1? :)
Thank you very much!

dannyyee
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby dannyyee » Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:32 pm UTC

I wrote a review of the Art of Computer Programming that might be useful - This post had objectionable content.

It's not a book for everyone, but it might be a useful reference even if you don't read it cover to cover.

Rules say no links till 5 posts.

jasperlevink
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby jasperlevink » Wed Apr 02, 2008 1:08 am UTC

Thanks!

For those who where unable to see the link:
dannyreviews
.com/
h/Art_Programming.html

jasperlevink
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby jasperlevink » Wed Apr 02, 2008 1:30 pm UTC

Hmm. One more question. Do you suggest to buy the fascicle (2005) or the 3rd edition (1997)?
Thanks

rabuf
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby rabuf » Wed Apr 02, 2008 5:38 pm UTC

Volume 1 Fascicle 1 (2005) is an update to a part of Volume 1 of TAoCP. In the book, Knuth created and used a machine called MIX, which he came up with several decades ago. MMIX is a more modern architecture and assembly language. What you will want though are the 3rd editions of the books.

jasperlevink
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby jasperlevink » Thu Apr 03, 2008 2:09 am UTC

Ok. Thanks!!!

jasperlevink
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby jasperlevink » Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:30 am UTC

hmm one more question.
Amazon sells vols 1-3 in a box set and calls it "2nd edition". So this is an older version than the 3rd version?

Or is this box edition 2 which contains volume editions 3?

Thanks.
Jasper

rabuf
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby rabuf » Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:47 pm UTC

Yes, 2nd edition boxed set is 3rd edition of the books.

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bridge
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby bridge » Thu Apr 03, 2008 3:27 pm UTC

Wait a minute, maybe you don't need a book,
what you need to learn is the notion of complexity and you can start by reading about the big-O on wikipedia.

Once you know what it means write an efficient algorithm, you can move on code optimization to speed up the execution of the program itself.
But this is relative to the language you're using, for example tail recursion is not supported by all languages,
or if you're using mostly C/C++ i recommend to have a solid background on how the operating system works, which syscalls are more expensive and so on.
You can find efficiency guidelines for basically any language online.

As someone said, TAOCP is a really dense book, in my opinion it will just throw too much information,
most of which you don't care about and it will end up confusing you.
Excuse my Super Mario accent

EvanED
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Re: suggestions for computer science books

Postby EvanED » Wed Apr 16, 2008 9:17 pm UTC

At Hammer's suggestion, I'm splitting the discussion of tail recursion off into its own topic. Give me a sec. to figure out how to work this. ;-) Edit: OK, I think I did that right eventually. New discussion is here. I'm keeping it in the computer science forum, at least for now.

Well done! You have passed the second test, Modhopper. - Hammer


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