math book club

For the discussion of math. Duh.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

littlebuddy
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 5:40 pm UTC

math book club

Postby littlebuddy » Thu Jul 09, 2009 6:44 pm UTC

what about a math book club?
that'd be kinda cool right?

auteur52
Posts: 165
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby auteur52 » Thu Jul 09, 2009 6:47 pm UTC

What kind of books? Popular, easy-reading math books, or serious textbooks?

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:01 pm UTC

I'd assume the former, since they already have the latter... it's called a university. :P
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

User avatar
Quaternia
Posts: 218
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:18 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Quaternia » Thu Jul 09, 2009 7:56 pm UTC

That's actually a pretty nifty idea...
So you'd basically pick a topic everyone is interested in, pick a book, and get everyone together say, once every two weeks to make sure everyone understood? Is that the general idea?
What usually ended up happening though, at least with my group of friends, is that people were interested in different things. You had some really into logic, others into vector and tensor calculus, others into group theory... So it would be hard to get everyone together and reading the same book, unless it was a sort of mixed book that covered a lot of different topics. And the drawback to that is that nobody would get very far into any set topic.
Another possibility would be to have everyone reading their own math book, and then explain briefly to the others what they'd read. The drawback to this method is that it pre-supposes a basic knowledge of every topic, which, as we were in different math classes, was not a given. So again, you run the risk of having very, very long discussions where someone basically has to teach the others everything, which wouldn't be very pratical.
Yakk wrote:hey look, the algorithm is a FSM. Thus, by his noodly appendage, QED

Buttons
Posts: 858
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 3:27 pm UTC
Location: Somerville

Re: math book club

Postby Buttons » Thu Jul 09, 2009 8:15 pm UTC

Quaternia wrote:So you'd basically pick a topic everyone is interested in, pick a book, and get everyone together say, once every two weeks to make sure everyone understood?

Isn't that one called "grad school"? This is what reading courses are. Except it's more often a collection of papers on a particular subject rather than a book.

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:53 pm UTC

The main issue is that reading a textbook and working all the exercises, for me, takes weeks. A tough problem can hold up my progress for three or four days, if it's tricky. That, and I feel like it'd be difficult to gather enough people all on the same level so that everyone would be both interested and able to understand.

However, it could work. Post up a book and give it a shot. I'd actually not really mind working through something with a group of people on the internet. Perhaps post up a schedule for reading the material that we all agree on and we can also use the thread for bouncing "homework" help around. My participation would entirely depend on the book, though.
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

littlebuddy
Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 5:40 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby littlebuddy » Thu Jul 09, 2009 11:11 pm UTC

i was thinking we would choose well known, well written textbooks, that were slim and easy to access, like dover or springer. and that were between advanced undergraduate to graduate with a prerequisite of only algebra or calculus. depending on how the book was arranged, or it's difficulty, we could do a section or chapter per week, solving all the exercises we could and discussing the solutions and topic on the weekend like sunday. for example, we could start with munkres topology, or rudins real analysis. i think a moderator should organize it for us, choosing books he feels are appropriate.

auteur52
Posts: 165
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby auteur52 » Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:39 am UTC

littlebuddy wrote:i was thinking we would choose well known, well written textbooks, that were slim and easy to access, like dover or springer.


I will selfishly suggest Atiyah and MacDonald's Commutative Algebra, as I'm supposed to read as much as possible over the summer. Maybe it's too high of a level.... but it's at least slim and very well-written.

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Fri Jul 10, 2009 1:27 am UTC

Argh I wish I was at a level where I could do this with you guys. Anything that's more "high-end" like modern algebra or analysis I would just be completely lost and that seems to be the most interesting stuff. =[

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Fri Jul 10, 2009 2:30 am UTC

Birk wrote:Argh I wish I was at a level where I could do this with you guys. Anything that's more "high-end" like modern algebra or analysis I would just be completely lost and that seems to be the most interesting stuff. =[


You're probably not as far away from those things as you'd think. Pick up a book on proof-writing that introduces some basic mathematics, logic, set theory, etc. and at that point you're probably at a position to tackle several other introductory texts. In some cases, you don't even have to have all the suggested prerequisites. I read through some of a book on category theory without having any formal education on topology or algebra and did well enough just looking at things on Wikipedia. Perhaps, if we're going to actually start some sort of mathematics book club on the board, we could have the first one be a nice introduction to mathematics.

Oh, and one caveat: not every book that starts with "An Introduction To..." is elementary. Be a bit wary. :P
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Fri Jul 10, 2009 2:55 am UTC

z4lis wrote:
Birk wrote:Argh I wish I was at a level where I could do this with you guys. Anything that's more "high-end" like modern algebra or analysis I would just be completely lost and that seems to be the most interesting stuff. =[


You're probably not as far away from those things as you'd think. Pick up a book on proof-writing that introduces some basic mathematics, logic, set theory, etc. and at that point you're probably at a position to tackle several other introductory texts. In some cases, you don't even have to have all the suggested prerequisites. I read through some of a book on category theory without having any formal education on topology or algebra and did well enough just looking at things on Wikipedia. Perhaps, if we're going to actually start some sort of mathematics book club on the board, we could have the first one be a nice introduction to mathematics.

Oh, and one caveat: not every book that starts with "An Introduction To..." is elementary. Be a bit wary. :P



Thanks for the tips. I just see some posts that are endless streams of symbols and functions and my brain goes :shock:. But you know what why not whatever you guys throw out there i'll do my best to keep up with.

And boy do I know about "An Introduction To..." and its perils. When I was in 11th grade I picked up the Dover book for Classical Mechanics because the school had Physics I listed as Mechanics and it looked cool on Amazon. Little did I know its a book for upper level undergraduates. :oops:

I still have it on my bookshelf I should try and tackle it again.

auteur52
Posts: 165
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby auteur52 » Fri Jul 10, 2009 3:17 am UTC

z4lis wrote:[I read through some of a book on category theory without having any formal education on topology or algebra and did well enough just looking at things on Wikipedia.


Category theory is definitely a "high-level" topic that doesn't require too many prerequisites at first. The reason it's taught so late is that it has very little motivation until you start to learn... well, probably homology is the first thing where it's extremely helpful. Anyways, on that note, a good category theory book wouldn't be too bad of an idea. I have Mac Lane's Categories for the Working Mathematician sitting around, but I'm not quite sure what level that is at. A solid number theory book could work quite well too.

I do agree that this is the kind of thing that we have universities for, but most students do independent study work at school; it would be an interesting experiment to see if a reading course/seminar could work online like this. It might fail, but it's worth a shot.

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Fri Jul 10, 2009 3:22 am UTC

That math112 pdf that someone posted in the Math Books thread is pretty interesting to me but probably too elementary for the target audience. Its a very basic over view of , mathematical symbols, reading and understanding proofs, and then moves into what feels like very basic number theory.

Plus its free!

User avatar
Quaternia
Posts: 218
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:18 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Quaternia » Fri Jul 10, 2009 5:04 pm UTC

The internet club idea sounds fun.
If we're looking for a general book, there's Mathematics: It's Content, Methods, and Meaning, published by Dover.
That's a very general, all inclusive sort of package, that covers the following topics per section, in around 1000 pages:
- Analysis
- Analytic geometry
- Algebra
- Ordinary differential equations
- Partial Differential equations
- Curves and surfaces
- The Calculus of variations
- Functions of a complex variable
- Prime numbers
- Probability
- Approximations of functions
- Computing techniques and approximation methods
- Electronic computing machines
- Theory of functions of a real variable
- LInear algebra
- Non-Euclidian geometry
- Topology
- Functional Analysis
- Groups and other algebraic systems (with a sizeable portion on hypercomplex numbers)
The advantage of such a book is that there would be something fun for everyone, the disadvantage is that, if someone is an expert in, say, topology, or just interested in linear algebra, they might get bored. A greater disadvantage is that it's an expensive book ($50 when I got my copy), and that there are barely no problems, so we would have to either have a second book with questions, or use the internet to find what we required.
Yakk wrote:hey look, the algorithm is a FSM. Thus, by his noodly appendage, QED

auteur52
Posts: 165
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby auteur52 » Fri Jul 10, 2009 5:13 pm UTC

It's only $25 on Amazon. Maybe buying textbooks has me jaded, but that's extremely cheap by my standards. Does this book have much depth at all? I know I could at least suggest problems for a few of those subjects (either from past exams, problem sets, textbooks, memory, etc.).

User avatar
Quaternia
Posts: 218
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:18 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Quaternia » Fri Jul 10, 2009 6:45 pm UTC

That's cheap by my standards too; I guess the price significantly dropped then.
Well, I'd have a hard time judging its difficulty level, to be honest I'm taking my first university-level math class right now, so I'm not very knowledgeable.
On the other hand, tell me something you'd expect to see and I'll check if it's in it.
As well, I'd say it has depth, it just moves fast. Expect a very good, easy to follow introduction to the subject, and then a quick pace through the material.
But once more, what I find to be depth might just be an appetizer to ya'll, so...
Yakk wrote:hey look, the algorithm is a FSM. Thus, by his noodly appendage, QED

RabidAltruism
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 9:25 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby RabidAltruism » Fri Jul 10, 2009 7:39 pm UTC

That looks like a good starting point for a math book club; I'd definitely be interested in participating if you guys end up pursuing the idea. If you're OK with used books, Amazon and allbookstores both have some copies in the $15-20 range, too - shaves a few bucks off.
...she reminds you of the invisible form of the soul; she gives life to her own discoveries; she awakens the mind and purifies the intellect; she brings light to our intrinsic ideas; she abolishes oblivion and ignorance which are ours by birth...

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Fri Jul 10, 2009 8:58 pm UTC

Alright, I'll go with this book, even if some of the chapters are things I've already seen. Does someone who's read it want to write up some sort of time frame on went to get it/read some part of it?
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

User avatar
Quaternia
Posts: 218
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:18 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Quaternia » Fri Jul 10, 2009 9:41 pm UTC

I've read chunks of it and was impressed, hence why I suggested it.
I've only rarely read entire chapters of it, mainly because it was above my level as they do go fast through the material (which is the main advantage with having this club, it'll enable us to help each other).
You said you've done parts of it before? Which ones, then? Because if a good portion of people have done a specific topic, then perhaps we can skip a chapter. As well, the way the book is designed is that it doesn't totally have to be a linear progression through the chapters, either; we can more or less pick what we are interested in, assuming a decent base.
So my question is: what are you all interested in? From that list of chapters I've posted, what tempts you the most? What bores you the most?
Yakk wrote:hey look, the algorithm is a FSM. Thus, by his noodly appendage, QED

RabidAltruism
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 9:25 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby RabidAltruism » Fri Jul 10, 2009 10:46 pm UTC

I'd kind of like to read it front-to-back, though a few of the topics are of intermediate familiarity to me.

Hopefully the expertises of folks will be more-or-less uniformly distributed across the chapters of the book. Could be an advantage to have a few people really good at one topic here and there.
...she reminds you of the invisible form of the soul; she gives life to her own discoveries; she awakens the mind and purifies the intellect; she brings light to our intrinsic ideas; she abolishes oblivion and ignorance which are ours by birth...

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:39 am UTC

Really that whole book interests me. I had planned to pick it up next week anyway.

User avatar
Quaternia
Posts: 218
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:18 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Quaternia » Sat Jul 11, 2009 1:13 am UTC

Okay, so if we were to read it from front to back...
It's up to ya'll to decide if you want to read the introduction, it covers the history and philosophy of mathematics, and as such there's not much we can debate or work on this.
The next chapter is on Analysis, takes 116 pages, and is broken down as such:
- Functions (what they are, key definitions, key history about them)
- Limits
- Continuous functions
- Derivative
- Rules for differentiation (derivative of a sum, a product, of a quotient, of the inverse function; table of derivatives, calculation of the derivative of a function of a function)
- Definition and examples of elementary functions (this part's really short, 3 paragraphs)
- Maximum and minimum: Investigation of the graphs of functions
- Determining the greatest and least values of a function
- Derivatives of higher orders
- Significance of the second derivative; convexity and concavity
- Criteria for maxima and minima
- Increment and differential of a function (i.e. volumes of revolution)
- Mean value theorem: examples of applications
- Taylor's formula
- Taylor's series
- Integral and definite integral
- The connection between differential and integral calculus
- Indefinite integrals (with a little summary sheet of the general properties, integration by parts)
- Functions of several variables (notation, geometric representation, partial derivatives and differential, differentiation, maximum and minimum problems, Taylor formula)
- Multiple integrals (contour and surface integrals, forumla of Ostrogradskii)
- Series (Concept of a series, series of functions, power series)
-------
And that's it for part 1. All in all, a very solid base of Calculus. Knowing the high level of these forums in terms of mathematical proficiency, we can move on to other things, or just touch on the more exotic material, if you wish. Personally I know I need to review all of this chapter, but I'm not going to inflict the definition of a derivative on someone who has a pure math doctorate! :mrgreen:

-
Last edited by Quaternia on Sat Jul 11, 2009 3:38 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
Yakk wrote:hey look, the algorithm is a FSM. Thus, by his noodly appendage, QED

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:06 am UTC

Yeah thats basically Calc I/II which would be perfect for me since i'm doing calc II in the fall and should brush up but I don't blame people who want to move on to other more interesting things.

Topology has always been interesting to me but I've never really sat down to look at any materials.

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Sat Jul 11, 2009 4:58 am UTC

Out of the list of general topics: I've covered analysis pretty well, as my "main" math course last semester was an analysis course. I'm correctly working through Royden's Real Analysis. So, I can't imagine I'd see too much new stuff in analysis chapter. I've also played with ODE's and some topology. My math courses next semester are abstract algebra and a graduate topology, so I suppose some extra work won't hurt there.

Skipping the "history" section seems like a dandy move for me, especially if there's not any mathematical concepts there. I'll read it myself, for giggles, though. Anyone willing to throw out a date on when we'll start?
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

robinboy
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 1:32 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby robinboy » Sat Jul 11, 2009 4:37 pm UTC

Fun idea.
Ho do we do it.
in a book club you meet somewhere once a month and discuss the book.
how do we discuss the book in a good way without a somewhere to meet?

robin, the boy wonder

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Sat Jul 11, 2009 4:39 pm UTC

We do have somewhere to meet :D

robinboy
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 1:32 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby robinboy » Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:06 pm UTC

my place or your place?

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

robinboy wrote:my place or your place?


This place.
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:10 pm UTC

I prefer our place.

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby z4lis » Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:22 pm UTC

Anyway, moving forward... I'll check in my local bookstore and if the book's on the shelf, I'll grab it. Otherwise, I won't have it for however long it takes to Amazon to ship plus however long it takes my lazy self to get on there and order it.

As far as a date to officially begin the reading, perhaps it's not unreasonable for everyone to have the book in two weeks? One week? Not sure how long to give everyone to actually read a chapter. That can be decided later.

Finally, is there any better way to organize this than this thread? If this actually gets off the ground and rolling, having a monster of a thread rolling about, cluttered with months of discussion might not be the best solution. :P
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

Birk
Posts: 236
Joined: Tue May 19, 2009 5:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Birk » Sat Jul 11, 2009 7:21 pm UTC

Maybe ask politely for a sub-forum :lol:

But yeah organization is something I've been thinking about instead of just a barrage of mismatched posts.

User avatar
acb
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 12:39 pm UTC
Location: England

Re: math book club

Postby acb » Sat Jul 11, 2009 8:01 pm UTC

I am up for this as well, although I have just got my maths degree. There looks to be some stuff in there I didn't cover, but most of it appears to be a review (which might not be a bad thing). I'll probably try and find a library to give it a flick through and see if it would be interesting.

Is there anyone else who would like to do another book club with some more advanced material? This is a really good idea and it would be good if we could perhaps get a couple of different levels going on, unless we all want to read something that doesn't require many prerequisites and isn't usually covered in the first few years of a degree course.

If there is anyone interested in some slightly more advanced reading, I would be interested in "An Introduction to Graph Theory" from Dover, "Algebraic Topology from a Homotopical Viewpoint" (which is £50 unfortunately) or something on Category Theory. The first two I have had a look at and they look very good, but they are expensive. I am also up for most other things that are pretty pure, if anyone else has any suggestions.

auteur52
Posts: 165
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:08 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby auteur52 » Sat Jul 11, 2009 8:12 pm UTC

acb wrote:If there is anyone interested in some slightly more advanced reading, I would be interested in "An Introduction to Graph Theory" from Dover, "Algebraic Topology from a Homotopical Viewpoint" (which is £50 unfortunately) or something on Category Theory. The first two I have had a look at and they look very good, but they are expensive. I am also up for most other things that are pretty pure, if anyone else has any suggestions.


If you're interested in Algebraic Topology, the standard text by Hatcher is available free online. Unfortunately it's not a great textbook, but the rest of the introductory AT books out there are pretty terrible as well. It starts out pretty easy and then gets difficult fairly quickly.

User avatar
acb
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 12:39 pm UTC
Location: England

Re: math book club

Postby acb » Sat Jul 11, 2009 8:37 pm UTC

Cheers, I'll have a look. I'm not really up for spending £50 and don't have access to a uni library so it will probably do me fine.

User avatar
Quaternia
Posts: 218
Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:18 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby Quaternia » Sat Jul 11, 2009 11:44 pm UTC

Regarding organisation, well, I'd suggest just having one thread per chapter.
So for our first chapter, it would look something like: "Book Club: 1, Analysis". But I do agree it would be nice if there was a way to link them all up.
And if the higher end reading also gets off the ground, we could perhaps colour-code them (if that's possible) or just write out "Book Club 1" and "Book Club 2" or "Book Club" and "Advanced Book Club".
Yakk wrote:hey look, the algorithm is a FSM. Thus, by his noodly appendage, QED

RabidAltruism
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 9:25 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby RabidAltruism » Sun Jul 12, 2009 7:16 am UTC

acb wrote:Is there anyone else who would like to do another book club with some more advanced material? This is a really good idea and it would be good if we could perhaps get a couple of different levels going on, unless we all want to read something that doesn't require many prerequisites and isn't usually covered in the first few years of a degree course.

If there is anyone interested in some slightly more advanced reading, I would be interested in "An Introduction to Graph Theory" from Dover, "Algebraic Topology from a Homotopical Viewpoint" (which is £50 unfortunately) or something on Category Theory. The first two I have had a look at and they look very good, but they are expensive. I am also up for most other things that are pretty pure, if anyone else has any suggestions.


I'll probably be playing catch-up relative to most folks interested (only one-half of my undergraduate degree was exclusively mathematical), but I would be interested in working through the Dover graph theory book. Amazon has used copies from around $5.
...she reminds you of the invisible form of the soul; she gives life to her own discoveries; she awakens the mind and purifies the intellect; she brings light to our intrinsic ideas; she abolishes oblivion and ignorance which are ours by birth...

User avatar
acb
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 12:39 pm UTC
Location: England

Re: math book club

Postby acb » Sun Jul 12, 2009 11:03 am UTC

Good stuff, I'll get hold of a copy. They are £5 on amazon uk too. Anyone else interested in this one? I think it should be fairly accessible, the blurb on amazon says only high school algebra is needed, and the review says it is fairly easy to follow.

RabidAltruism
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 9:25 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby RabidAltruism » Sun Jul 12, 2009 5:56 pm UTC

I just purchased the Dover graph theory book via allbookstores - should be 1-2 weeks before it arrives at my house, but then I'll be good to go.

I have another wee volume on graph theory that I've played around with before; judging on that basis, I'd think high school alg sounds about right as a prereq. I imagine some of the more advanced material on random graphs might be a little bit more demanding, but cross that bridge when we come to, I figure.
...she reminds you of the invisible form of the soul; she gives life to her own discoveries; she awakens the mind and purifies the intellect; she brings light to our intrinsic ideas; she abolishes oblivion and ignorance which are ours by birth...

DavCrav
Posts: 239
Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2008 3:04 pm UTC
Location: Oxford, UK

Re: math book club

Postby DavCrav » Sun Jul 12, 2009 6:26 pm UTC

RabidAltruism wrote:I just purchased the Dover graph theory book via allbookstores - should be 1-2 weeks before it arrives at my house, but then I'll be good to go.

I have another wee volume on graph theory that I've played around with before; judging on that basis, I'd think high school alg sounds about right as a prereq. I imagine some of the more advanced material on random graphs might be a little bit more demanding, but cross that bridge when we come to, I figure.


Having a look at the table of contents of this book, it appears to be a very basic introduction, and should be easily accessible to schoolchildren. If you want to learn about random graphs, you will need a much more modern (and more advanced) book, I'm afraid.

RabidAltruism
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 9:25 pm UTC

Re: math book club

Postby RabidAltruism » Sun Jul 12, 2009 7:17 pm UTC

DavCrav wrote:
RabidAltruism wrote:I just purchased the Dover graph theory book via allbookstores - should be 1-2 weeks before it arrives at my house, but then I'll be good to go.

I have another wee volume on graph theory that I've played around with before; judging on that basis, I'd think high school alg sounds about right as a prereq. I imagine some of the more advanced material on random graphs might be a little bit more demanding, but cross that bridge when we come to, I figure.


Having a look at the table of contents of this book, it appears to be a very basic introduction, and should be easily accessible to schoolchildren. If you want to learn about random graphs, you will need a much more modern (and more advanced) book, I'm afraid.


I hadn't actually looked inside it, but you seem to be right; still, I think I consider that a good thing. An extremely elementary introduction would be nice; It should be a useful transition into my other graph theory text, Modern Graph Theory.

acb - the Trudeau Dover book was the one you were thinking of, right?
...she reminds you of the invisible form of the soul; she gives life to her own discoveries; she awakens the mind and purifies the intellect; she brings light to our intrinsic ideas; she abolishes oblivion and ignorance which are ours by birth...


Return to “Mathematics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests