Favorite math jokes

For the discussion of math. Duh.

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Shakleton
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Shakleton » Sat Mar 08, 2008 11:34 am UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:Because I like to toss speakers of other languages a bit of advice when they have trouble, the word for someone who does physics for a living is "physicist". A "physician" is a doctor. The word for "Chemistry-Guy" is "chemist".


Thanks. I edited my post so it should be right now.

New Joke:

A huge building is burning and three people are trapped on the roof. The firemen have a net and courage the three men to jump.

The first one is a theologian. He shouts: "If there's a god, he will save me!", jumps and lands five meters beyond the net.

The second one, an engineer, pulls out his calculator, does a few measurements, jumps and lands directly on the net.

The third one is a mathematician. He does a few calculations on a blackboard with the chalk he keeps in his pocket. He jumps off the roof but instead of falling to the ground, he is catapulted up into the air, gets higher and higher until he is thrown up into outer space.

The firemen look irritated at the engineer. He replies. "Oh, I've seen that before. It's called a sign flaw."
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0/0 is positive!

Postby Masapena » Tue Mar 11, 2008 4:32 pm UTC

All of the math should be rewritten ! i have found a new theorem that gives a well-defined value for 0/0 (at least when we consider null vectors):

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Re: 0/0 is positive!

Postby Robin S » Tue Mar 11, 2008 4:39 pm UTC

This is meant as a joke, right? You know that you can't divide vectors by each other, let alone the zero vector by itself?

Edit: didn't realize those were meant to be bars (representing vectors) changing into minus signs, and also managed to miss the fact the the answer given was "+". This is what you get from countless (usually online) encounters with people who are convinced they've discovered groundbreaking maths out of the blue.

It's actually not a bad joke, by mathematicians' standards.
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

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Re: 0/0 is positive!

Postby 3.14159265... » Tue Mar 11, 2008 5:16 pm UTC

I was about to go ape shit on his ass about it too.

I am still half-mad. You shoulda posted it in the jokes thread as we already have a rules thread that says "We know about the 0/0 thing"
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:03 pm UTC

Yeah, I've moved it into the joke thread, because this is, after all, the place for it. No sense starting a new thread every time someone comes up with another mildly amusing math joke.
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Qoppa » Sat Mar 15, 2008 1:16 am UTC

Why are pirates awesome at calculus?

They never forget the C!!!!!!

Code: Select all

_=0,w=-1,(*t)(int,int);a()??<char*p="[gd\
~/d~/\\b\x7F\177l*~/~djal{x}h!\005h";(++w
<033)?(putchar((*t)(w??(p:>,w?_:0XD)),a()
):0;%>O(x,l)??<_='['/7;{return!(x%(_-11))
?x??'l:x^(1+ ++l);}??>main(){t=&O;w=a();}

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby btilly » Sat Mar 15, 2008 2:18 am UTC

Shakleton wrote:There might be some errors in my English, please excuse me.

HOW DO PEOPLE PROOVE THAT ALL UNEVEN NUMBERS ARE PRIME NUMBERS?

Here is one more.

English majors:
3 (pause) yup!
5 (pause) yup!
7 (pause) yup!
9 (pause) yup!
11...
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Re: Favorite Math Jokes

Postby Mr. Timms » Sat Mar 15, 2008 11:48 pm UTC

Scarblac wrote:
mister k wrote:An engineer, a physicist and a statistician are in a hotel when a fire starts.

A chemist wakes up at night, and comes to the startling discovery that his room is on fire. He grabs a bucket, fills it with water, and quenches the fire. Relieved, he goes back to sleep.

A physicist wakes up at night, and comes to the startling discovery that his room is on fire. He runs to his desk and starts calculating and drawing graphs; after some minutes, he takes a bucket, fills it with exactly 8.56 liter of water, and throws it in the exactly correct trajectory to let it cover the fire. Relieved, he goes back to sleep.

A mathematician wakes up at night, and comes to the startling discovery that his room is on fire. He runs to his desk, and starts calculating, using many sheets of paper. Eventually, he writes "QED" and exclaims, "there is a solution!" Relieved, he goes back to sleep.


I've heard something similar to this joke, the last one on the first page, which I will relate to you:

An engineer, a chemist, and a mathematician all check in to the same hotel. Later that night, a fire started in the hotel.

The engineer woke up and saw that his room was on fire. He turned on all of the faucets, effectively, (but not very conservatively, :)) putting out the fire. The engineer went back to sleep.

The chemist woke up and saw that his room was on fire. Unlike the engineer, he started researching inside his handbook, then he poured an exact amount of water in a graduated cylinder and poured it over the fire so that no water was wasted. (Very conservative!) He went back to sleep.

The mathematician woke up and saw that his room was on fire. Unlike anyone else except another mathematician, he lit a match, stuck it into a glass of water. He noticed that the match was extinguished, and thusly, declared, "A solution exists," and went back to sleep.
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby notzeb » Sun Mar 16, 2008 12:27 am UTC

Or the classic variation on that joke: the mathematician wakes up the engineer, reducing the problem to a previously solved problem.
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Robin S » Sat Mar 22, 2008 12:20 pm UTC

"And God said, Let there be ε > 0. And there was N : n > N → |xn - l| < ε, and He saw that it was convergent."
This is a placeholder until I think of something more creative to put here.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby tricky77puzzle » Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:18 pm UTC

Einstein's calculus equation

(The natural logarithm constant) = (?!?) * (The difference between a function and the integral of the derivative of the same function)².

What does m equal?

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby notzeb » Sat Mar 22, 2008 8:07 pm UTC

tricky77puzzle wrote:Einstein's calculus equation

(The natural logarithm constant) = (?!?) * (The difference between a function and the integral of the derivative of the same function)².

What does m equal?

Most likely an integer.

A bunch of people are on a plane that's going to take three hours to get to its destination. This plane is really really big, so it has four huge engines. So the plane's going, going, going, and then all of a sudden there's a loud "THUNK!" All the passengers look around nervously, and the pilot starts speaking on the intercom: "Er, we just lost an engine. Don't worry, though! Three engines are enough to get to our destination! But now the trip will take four hours, not three."

Everyone is a little unsettled, but things calm down again. So the plane is going, going, going, and then all of a sudden there's another "THUNK!" The pilot starts speaking again: "We, uh, lost another engine... But don't worry! Two engines are more than enough to get where we're going! But now it'll take six hours to get there."

Now the passengers are starting to worry, but they just sit tight and wait. So the plane is going, going, going, and all of a sudden there's a "THUNK!" As the passengers start freaking out, the pilot says: "It's okay! Even though it'll be difficult, one engine is enough to fly the plane. The only difference is that now, it'll take us twelve hours to get there."

A mathematician is on the plane, and upon hearing this, he moans and says, "Oh God - I hope we don't lose another engine, or we'll be stuck up here forever!"
Zµ«V­jÕ«ZµjÖ­Zµ«VµjÕ­ZµkV­ZÕ«VµjÖ­Zµ«V­jÕ«ZµjÖ­ZÕ«VµjÕ­ZµkV­ZÕ«VµjÖ­Zµ«V­jÕ«ZµjÖ­ZÕ«VµjÕ­ZµkV­ZÕ«ZµjÖ­Zµ«V­jÕ«ZµjÖ­ZÕ«VµjÕ­Z

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby yjester » Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:23 am UTC

Robin S wrote:"And God said, Let there be ε > 0. And there was N : n > N → |xn - l| < ε, and He saw that it was convergent."


Well, my 15-minute joke will be something biblical as well -__- Let's start:
And He said, "Let there be a null element that separates the numbers above the null element from the numbers under the null element", and that was so. And He called the numbers above the null element positive, and the numbers under the null element negative.

Then God said, "Let us make a man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over all the numbers and symbols, and over relationships between people and stuff, and over the groups of the heaven, and over the infinitesimals and infinites, and over every imaginary constant that lies above the Real line." So God created the mathematicians in his own image, in the image of God he created him; as male he created them. And God blessed them, and God said "Now let's create the other, fruitful ones, that shall rule what really exists, and among them let there be females"

There's also a good mathematical drama at http://www.math.umbc.edu/~rouben/the-candidate.html , from where I take some excerpts:

BETA: Ah, yes, but you see, in my paper on toxic algebras... 1957... Journal of Refined Mathematics and Statistical Dynamics of the University of Lompoc... I showed that the third axiom need not be satisfied if the basis is countably finite and the metric is Noetherian, hence...

ALPHA: (Interrupting) Ahem, excuse me. The candidate will please prove the hokus-locus theorem on uniform trivialities.

CANDIDATE: By the Heine-Borel Theorem we reduce the Hamilton-Cayley equation to the canonical Cauchy-Riemann form. The Bolzano-Weierstrass property then shows that the Radon-Nikodym derivative satisfies the Jordan-Holder relation. Hence by the Stone-Weierstrass approximation we can get the Schroeder-Bernstein map to be simply separable. The Lebesgue-Stieltjes integral then satisfies the Riemann-Roch result when extended by the Hahn-Banach method almost somewhere.

BETA: Please define a compact set.

CANDIDATE: A set is compact if every covering by open sets has a finite sub-opening. I mean every opening by finite sets has a compact subcovering. Er... rather, every compact by an open finite has a subcover. I mean a finact combine subopen if setcover set everything. That is, almost some of the time.

ALPHA: Leave that for a moment. Instead could you give us an example of a compact set?

CANDIDATE: Uh, you consider the real line and take any bounded subset, I mean closed subnet, er, I mean complete subsequence... bounded elements...

BETA: For example, is an interval compact?

CANDIDATE: Yes... er, I mean no... that is sometimes... almost everywhere?... if it is finite... or rational, I mean the irrationals -- given a Dedekind cut -- er, all the numbers less than square root of 2 have a limit, that is...
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Luthen » Wed Mar 26, 2008 1:47 pm UTC

yjester wrote:There's also a good mathematical drama at http://www.math.umbc.edu/~rouben/the-candidate.html , from where I take some excerpts:
Explanation required

Surprised this hasn't posted:
that email you got last month wrote:Weapons of Math Instruction

At New York's Kennedy airport today, an individual later discovered to be a public school teacher was arrested trying to board a flight while in possession of a protractor, a T-square, a slide rule, and a calculator.

At a morning press conference, Attorney general John Ashcroft said he believes the man is a member of the notorious Al-gebra movement. The man is being charged by the FBI with carrying weapons of math instruction.

"Al-gebra is a fearsome cult," Ashcroft said. "They desire average solutions by means and extremes, and sometimes go off on tangents in a search for absolute value. They use secret code names like x and y and refer to themselves as unknowns, but we have determined they belong to a common denominator of the axis of medieval with coordinates in every country. As the Greek philanderer Isosceles used to say, there are 3 sides to every triangle," Ashcroft declared.

When asked to comment on the arrest, President Bush said, "If God had wanted us to have better weapons of math instruction, He would have given us more fingers and toes. I am gratified that our government has given us a sine that it is intent on protracting us from these math-dogs who are willing to dis-integrate us with calculus disregard. Murky statisticians love to inflict plane on every sphere of influence," the President said, adding: "Under the circumferences, we must differentiate their root, make our point, and draw the line."

President Bush warned, "These weapons of math instruction have the potential to decimal everything in their math on a scalene never before seen unless we become exponents of a Higher Power and begin to factor-in random facts of vertex."

Attorney General Ashcroft said, "As our Great Leader would say, read my ellipse. Here is one principle he is uncertainty of: though they continue to multiply, their days are numbered as the hypotenuse tightens around their necks."
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby seladore » Wed Mar 26, 2008 4:26 pm UTC

The greatest maths joke of all time...



Let epsilon be less than zero.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Maseiken » Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:31 pm UTC

seladore wrote:The greatest maths joke of all time...



Let epsilon be less than zero.

OH SHI-!
"GRRRRRRRRRROOOOOOOOWR!!!!"
(Translation: "Objection!")

Maseiken had the ball at the top of the key...

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby tricky77puzzle » Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:23 pm UTC

Ended wrote:There are 2 types of people in the world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data


You can't extrapolate from only one point!

There are 4 types of people in the world: those who understand binary, those who don't, and those who can properly extrapolate.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby jestingrabbit » Fri Mar 28, 2008 2:14 am UTC

tricky77puzzle wrote:
Ended wrote:There are 2 types of people in the world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data


You can't extrapolate from only one point!

There are 4 types of people in the world: those who understand binary, those who don't, and those who can properly extrapolate.


Don't all the other jokes of this ilk count as data in your reality?
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Maseiken » Sat Mar 29, 2008 12:54 am UTC

tricky77puzzle wrote:
Ended wrote:There are 2 types of people in the world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data


You can't extrapolate from only one point!

There are 4 types of people in the world: those who understand binary, those who don't, and those who can properly extrapolate.

Those are not four distinct groups, many who can Extrapolate might also understand Binary, or Vice Versa.
"GRRRRRRRRRROOOOOOOOWR!!!!"
(Translation: "Objection!")

Maseiken had the ball at the top of the key...

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby antonfire » Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:01 am UTC

Because 2+2=2*2, though, it's still four distinct groups, just stated in a somewhat odd way.
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Tinyboss » Sun Apr 20, 2008 5:55 pm UTC

Two engineers had been assigned the task of measuring the height of the flagpole in the quadrangle. They were having trouble, however, because as soon as they'd get the tape measure more than 10 feet or so up the pole, it would flop over. Along came a mathematician and said, "let me help you with that".

So with his huge math muscles, he rips up the flagpole and puts it flat on the ground. He lays out the measuring tape beside it, and reads off the answer, then walks away.

One engineer turns the other and says, "that's just like a mathematician--you ask him for height, and he gives you width."

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Klotz » Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:12 pm UTC

This is more of a physics joke and will probably only make sense to Canadians, but...

What do you call someone who works in Toronto but lives in Hamilton?
Spoiler:
A commuting Hamiltonian!

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Eschatokyrios » Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:47 am UTC

tricky77puzzle wrote:
Ended wrote:There are 2 types of people in the world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data


You can't extrapolate from only one point!

There are 4 types of people in the world: those who understand binary, those who don't, and those who can properly extrapolate.


There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand n-ary, those who don't, and those who think it's

Code: Select all

(define (recurse n))
(display (list "And those who think it's " n "-ary"))
(recurse (+ n 1))
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Arancaytar » Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:08 am UTC

An Indian chief had three wives, each of whom was pregnant.
The first gave birth to a boy. The chief was so elated he built her a teepee made of deer hide.
A few days later, the second gave birth, also to a boy. The chief was very happy. He built her a teepee made of antelope hide.
The third wife gave birth a few days later, but the chief kept the details a secret. He built this one a two-story teepee, made out of hippopotamus hide.
The chief then challenged members of the tribe to guess what had occurred. Many tried, unsuccessfully.
Finally, one young brave declared that the third wife had given birth to twin boys.
“Correct,” said the chief. “How did you figure it out?”
The warrior answered, “It's elementary. The value of the squaw of the hippopotamus is equal to the sons of the squaws of the other two hides.”

There are variations on this one. In fact, the Pythagorean theorem is exceptionally easy to pun. :)
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby sckego » Mon Apr 21, 2008 5:53 pm UTC

You know how some of these jokes require somewhat specialized knowledge that the average person might not understand? Well, you might only get this one if you're from (or have lived in) Hawaii.

A bear was walking along a trail one day. He'd just had a large meal, and was somewhat uncomfortable. As he passed a tree, he realized that he had to drop a load, and do it NOW, so he squatted down next to the tree and let 'er rip. "Ah, that's better," he thought after he was done, and continued on his way. A few minutes later, though, the same urge came over him again, so again, he sidled up a tree along the trail and dropped a few more kids off. Afterward, he continued on, but then one last time had to stop next to yet another tree to drop a final bomb. That being done, he got up, decided he felt much, much better, and went on his way.

At some time a short while later, a (mathematically-minded) rabbit came hopping along the same path. He noticed an upleasant odor in the air, and soon came upon the first present the bear had left. "Ughh!" groaned the rabbit, and hurried along. It wasn't long before he found the bear's second load along the trail. "Ewwww!" he cried, and kept on his way at a fast pace. Finally, he came to the bear's last dropping. The rabbit looked at it, stared thoughtfully into space for a second, then cried "Ten!"

Why did the rabbit say 'ten'?

Spoiler:
'Cause, it was tree and a turd, tree and a turd, tree and a turd.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Various Varieties » Mon Apr 21, 2008 7:37 pm UTC

Image

I recently found this book, "Comic Sections" by Desmond MacHale, in the library. (Here is someone's blog post about it.) There are a LOT of jokes (and anecdotes) in it which would keep this thread going for months. :) Alas, it is out of print... I keep intending to copy out some of the best ones before I take it back...

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby SpitValve » Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:37 pm UTC

Klotz wrote:This is more of a physics joke and will probably only make sense to Canadians, but...

What do you call someone who works in Toronto but lives in Hamilton?
Spoiler:
A commuting Hamiltonian!


Nice :)

One of my fellow astrophysics grad students is from Hamilton: he appreciated that.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby tricky77puzzle » Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:03 pm UTC

Here's one I made up involving trigonometric functions and Einstein's equation:

Question: prove that all angles are equal, using mathematically nonrigorous concepts.

sec² (theta)/ csc² (theta) = tan²(theta) (this is derived from sin² / cos² = tan².)

Divide by sc² (theta) on both sides:
e / c = tan² (theta)

Since E = mc², E / c = mc, so:
mc = tan² (theta)

since m (slope) = tan (the angle to a horizontal line), then divide by "tan" on both sides:
c = tan (theta)

since C is a constant, then the tan of the angle must always be constant.

Therefore, all angles are equal, QED.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby tricky77puzzle » Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:06 pm UTC

Maseiken wrote:
tricky77puzzle wrote:
Ended wrote:There are 2 types of people in the world: those who can extrapolate from incomplete data


You can't extrapolate from only one point!

There are 4 types of people in the world: those who understand binary, those who don't, and those who can properly extrapolate.

Those are not four distinct groups, many who can Extrapolate might also understand Binary, or Vice Versa.


Vice versa, it's the same thing. Anyway, you still can't only extrapolate from one point. (and who said the sets had to be distinct?)

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby mudge » Wed Apr 23, 2008 11:13 pm UTC

sckego wrote:You know how some of these jokes require somewhat specialized knowledge that the average person might not understand? Well, you might only get this one if you're from (or have lived in) Hawaii.

A bear was walking along a trail one day. He'd just had a large meal, and was somewhat uncomfortable. As he passed a tree, he realized that he had to drop a load, and do it NOW, so he squatted down next to the tree and let 'er rip. "Ah, that's better," he thought after he was done, and continued on his way. A few minutes later, though, the same urge came over him again, so again, he sidled up a tree along the trail and dropped a few more kids off. Afterward, he continued on, but then one last time had to stop next to yet another tree to drop a final bomb. That being done, he got up, decided he felt much, much better, and went on his way.

At some time a short while later, a (mathematically-minded) rabbit came hopping along the same path. He noticed an upleasant odor in the air, and soon came upon the first present the bear had left. "Ughh!" groaned the rabbit, and hurried along. It wasn't long before he found the bear's second load along the trail. "Ewwww!" he cried, and kept on his way at a fast pace. Finally, he came to the bear's last dropping. The rabbit looked at it, stared thoughtfully into space for a second, then cried "Ten!"

Why did the rabbit say 'ten'?

Spoiler:
'Cause, it was tree and a turd, tree and a turd, tree and a turd.


I heard this joke as...

A foreman is hiring guys for a job, and this guy Tony from the Bronx is applying, but the foreman hates New Yorkers, so he tells Tony that he's got to pass a test before he can get the job.

The foreman says, "Alright, I need you to represent the number 9... without using any letters or numbers" and Tony says, "Ey, no problem" and draws three trees. The foreman says, "How the hell is that the number nine?" to which Tony replies, "Whaddya think? Tree and tree and tree makes nine."

The foreman says, "Okay, fine, fine. Now represent the number 99, no letters or numbers." and Tony says, "Yeah, no problem" and smudges the drawings of the trees. The foreman goes, "How is that 99?", and Tony says, "Dirty tree and dirty tree and dirty tree makes 99"

The foreman, getting agitated, says, "Alright smart-ass, represent 100" and Tony draws a little pile of crap next to each tree and says, "Here ya go: Dirty tree and a turd, dirty tree and a turd, dirty tree and a turd. Dat's one hundred."
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Sine Nomen
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Sine Nomen » Fri Apr 25, 2008 3:23 pm UTC

I'm amazed that this one hasn't been posted yet:

Why is six afraid of seven?
Spoiler:
Because 7 8 9!


Or this one:

What do you get when you divide the circumference of a jack-o-lantern by its diameter?
Spoiler:
Pumpkin Pi!


Oh I should stop this...
What is the first derivative of a cow?
Spoiler:
Prime Rib!


"Divide fourteen sugar cubes into three cups of coffee so that each cup has an odd number of sugar cubes in it."
"That's easy: one, one, and twelve."
"But twelve isn't odd!"
"It's an odd number of cubes to put in a cup of coffee..."


"The number you have dialed is imaginary. Please, rotate your phone by 90 degrees and try again..."


A physicist, a statistician, and a (pure) mathematician go to the races and place bets on horses.
The physicist's horse comes in last. "I don't understand it. I have determined each horse's strength through a series of careful measurements."
The statistician's horse does a little bit better, but still fails miserably. "How is this possible? I have statistically evaluated the results of all races for the past month."
They both look at the mathematician whose horse came in first. "How did you do it?"
"Well", he explains. "First, I assumed that all horses were identical and spherical..."


The problems for the exam will be similar to the discussed in the class. Of course, the numbers will be different. But not all of them. Pi will still be 3.14159...


We've all seen this one in many forms, but I particularly like this ending:
A biologist, a statistician, a mathematician and a computer scientist are on a photo-safari in africa. They drive out on the savannah in their jeep, stop and scout the horizon with their binoculars.

The biologist: "Look! There's a herd of zebras! And there, in the middle : A white zebra! It's fantastic! There are white zebra's! We'll be famous!"

The statistician: "It's not significant. We only know there's one white zebra."

The mathematician: "Actually, we only know there exists a zebra, which is white on one side."

The computer scientist: "Oh, no! A special case!"


There was once a very smart horse. Anything that was shown it, it mastered easily, until one day, its teachers tried to teach it about rectangular coordinates and it couldn't understand them. All the horse's acquaintances and friends tried to figure out what was the matter and couldn't. Then a new guy looked at the problem and said,
"Of course he can't do it. Why, you're putting Descartes before the horse!"
Last edited by Sine Nomen on Fri Apr 25, 2008 5:59 pm UTC, edited 2 times in total.

Buttons
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Buttons » Fri Apr 25, 2008 4:12 pm UTC

Sine Nomen wrote:Why is six afraid of seven?
Because seven's friggin' HUGE!

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby pkuky » Fri Apr 25, 2008 7:39 pm UTC

why is 6 afraid of the 2501th decimal digit of e?
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Nimz » Sun Apr 27, 2008 4:35 am UTC

Sine Nomen wrote:I'm amazed that this one hasn't been posted yet:

Why is six afraid of seven?
Because 7 8 9!
Shouldn't it be ten that's afraid of seven? I mean, 7 8 9, and 10 is next.
LOWA

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hyperion
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby hyperion » Sun Apr 27, 2008 4:49 am UTC

Nimz wrote:
Sine Nomen wrote:I'm amazed that this one hasn't been posted yet:

Why is six afraid of seven?
Because 7 8 9!
Shouldn't it be ten that's afraid of seven? I mean, 7 8 9, and 10 is next.

Well, 6 looks more like 9. Maybe 7 is into those sorts of numbers
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby dosboot » Sun Apr 27, 2008 5:08 am UTC

But when you say it verbally it sounds better to have the 6,7,8 and 9 appear sequentially.

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Nimz » Sun Apr 27, 2008 6:30 am UTC

hyperion wrote:
Nimz wrote:
Sine Nomen wrote:I'm amazed that this one hasn't been posted yet:

Why is six afraid of seven?
Because 7 8 9!
Shouldn't it be ten that's afraid of seven? I mean, 7 8 9, and 10 is next.

Well, 6 looks more like 9. Maybe 7 is into those sorts of numbers
But then it's a graphemic joke, which will vary with different systems of writing numbers, when it's supposed to be verbal to get the pun value. So it's, uh, slightly more universal with ten.
dosboot wrote:But when you say it verbally it sounds better to have the 6,7,8 and 9 appear sequentially.
Hmm. 6, 7, 7, 8, 9 vs. 10, 7, 7, 8, 9, 10. I'm still not completely convinced, but it is a compelling argument. Perhaps:

Why is six afraid of seven? Because 7 8 9. But ten is next, so six isn't in any danger ... yet.

That yields 6, 7, 7, 8, 9, 10, 6.
LOWA

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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby The_Duck » Sun Apr 27, 2008 8:18 am UTC

pkuky wrote:why is 6 afraid of the 2501th decimal digit of e?


It doesn't want to get stomped by the T-Rex.
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby Devv » Sun Apr 27, 2008 3:18 pm UTC

Q: Why is it impossible to create a derivative for a Liberal Arts major?
A: Because they have no function.
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Re: Favorite math jokes

Postby joshg8 » Mon Apr 28, 2008 4:19 am UTC

Nimz wrote:
Sine Nomen wrote:I'm amazed that this one hasn't been posted yet:

Why is six afraid of seven?
Because 7 8 9!
Shouldn't it be ten that's afraid of seven? I mean, 7 8 9, and 10 is next.


Yeah but 7 is standing right behind 6!! RUN 6 RUN!!!!


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