Creating A Real Baymax

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Girl-With-A-Math-Fetish
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Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Girl-With-A-Math-Fetish » Tue Mar 24, 2015 12:10 am UTC

We've all seen Big Hero 6. We all love Baymax. Now, obviously there are aspects of Baymax that can't ever be real. But Baymax is supposedly based on the existing idea of inflatable healthcare robots for the elderly and children. I don't think they should limit them to just those age cohorts though. Seriously, only those with a phobia of balloons would not want to be around Baymax, haha! He's so adorable.

Anyway. How real could we make Baymax using current or emerging technology? Baymax's exterior and frame would be easy to build. Someone has already built a hyperrealistic cosplay version of Baymax. If you saw the cosplay pictures of him, you'd think it was a screenshot of the movie, until you saw a picture with a real Hiro (the cosplayer looks identical to Hiro). Baymax has a carbon fiber frame, and this could translate well realistically.

Assuming we added voice recognition to Baymax (in essence, he'd come if you screamed ow, or a rapid sequence of curse words. or if you say "I've fallen and I can't get up!"). This way, we can communicate with him when he asks "On a scale of one to ten, how would you rate your pain?" You could also program him with WebMD-like features, and you could tell him your symptoms, and he could make a diagnosis. Then you could go to your doctor with the diagnosis and such. We have tech that can scan your face and body and tell your heart rate and breath rate and such. This could be implemented into Baymax. He could also poke you with something similar to a glucose meter sampler and run various tests on your blood.

Baymax could also help the elderly around the house (he'd contain sonar to understand his surroundings), help them up, and possibly help them bathe (vinyl is waterproof, although this might be awkward). I mean, he'd be quite "sentient" in a way, and while he'd not be as complex as the movie version and wouldn't be nearly as sentient, he'd still be sentient enough to call it a him. He'd be like Siri, but be much better and would be essentially an ask MD type thing. The projector belly would be easy enough.

He could be programmed to give hugs, too.


What else would we be able to add?
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Re: Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Copper Bezel » Wed Mar 25, 2015 12:32 am UTC

The way his inflated parts work is not really realistic. The only reason they're there is, I think, to reduce risk of injury from running into him or something, but without some kind of internal lattice stretched between the skin and the frame, they're just going to wobble around the frame and effectively expose it to impacts anyway. It also complicates dexterity quite a lot.
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Re: Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed Mar 25, 2015 12:37 am UTC

balalalalala
I've got nothing to add about the feasibility of making a real baymax, but as an older brother, I could barely make it through this movie without sobbing.
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Re: Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Cradarc » Wed Mar 25, 2015 3:15 am UTC

I think the hardest part is not the physical structure but the AI. Baymax has an incredible ability to adapt and make sense of new concepts.
Baymax can identify when certain actions can hinder his purpose of helping people, but also holds the capability to override such concerns when Hiro says it will help him. Baymax can evaluate a situation and conclude the only way to save a human is to let itself be destroyed/lost forever. This sort of behavior isn't computable, it requires reasoning (or at least extremely flexible logic).
Despite the recent increase in hype about AI, we are still very far away from this. Some people don't even think it is possible with conventional circuitry.
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Re: Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Girl-With-A-Math-Fetish » Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:34 pm UTC

Copper Bezel wrote:they're just going to wobble around the frame and effectively expose it to impacts anyway.

I assumed the lattice framework from the get-go. I mean, we already have giant (and I mean GIANT) inflatables. Ones that are forty feet tall. I'm sure that we could find a material strong enough and a lattice work good enough to make Baymax sturdy.

Izawwlgood wrote:I could barely make it through this movie without sobbing.

It's my favorite movie. I mean, I probably cried three to four times during the movie. It's so cute! I ship Hiromax so hard, haha!

Cradarc wrote:Some people don't even think it is possible with conventional circuitry.

I doubt this. I *highly* doubt this. In fact, I think just the opposite. I think it's just a matter of time before we're able to create AI complex enough to reason. Fifty years ago, computers barely existed. We would have never guessed that it got as complex as it did. If we changed this much in fifty years, imagine where we'll be fifty years from now.

Reasoning, is as you said, a form of flexible logic. Sooner or later, we'll be able to program robots to reason and love. Of course AI is very rudimentary now, but AI is a relatively new technology. We're at that stage in AI that's comparable to the stage of where computers were at fifty years ago. If that means I have to wait fifty years for a Baymax, I'll wait fifty years for a Baymax.

Just don't give the robots control of a scientific facility and give them any neurotoxin.
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Re: Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Tyndmyr » Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:10 pm UTC

Girl-With-A-Math-Fetish wrote:
Cradarc wrote:Some people don't even think it is possible with conventional circuitry.

I doubt this. I *highly* doubt this. In fact, I think just the opposite. I think it's just a matter of time before we're able to create AI complex enough to reason. Fifty years ago, computers barely existed. We would have never guessed that it got as complex as it did. If we changed this much in fifty years, imagine where we'll be fifty years from now.


Those people are almost certainly wrong...but more because universal turing machines can simulate each other, so, meh. We'll just simulate humanity in software or whatever.

But I think Cradarc's point is that it's sufficiently far off that some people are just unable to imagine it. We've actually been working on AI stuff for a while now, and while progress HAS been made, we're still quite far from anything at a baymax scale. And, it's a hard enough problem, with poorly defined goals, that it's really hard to say when we'll get there. The whole problem of what all has to be included to be "real" AI is kind of subjective still, and is often redefined.

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Re: Creating A Real Baymax

Postby Copper Bezel » Thu Mar 26, 2015 12:50 am UTC

Girl-With-A-Math-Fetish wrote:
Copper Bezel wrote:they're just going to wobble around the frame and effectively expose it to impacts anyway.

I assumed the lattice framework from the get-go. I mean, we already have giant (and I mean GIANT) inflatables. Ones that are forty feet tall. I'm sure that we could find a material strong enough and a lattice work good enough to make Baymax sturdy.

Yeah, sorry. I was weirdly thinking more in terms of "how accurate is this" instead of "how possible is this," which wasn't really helpful.
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