Why does the skin on my fingers wrinkle when I am in the bath too long? /answered

For the discussion of the sciences. Physics problems, chemistry equations, biology weirdness, it all goes here.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

p1t1o
Posts: 856
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 4:32 pm UTC
Location: London, UK

Why does the skin on my fingers wrinkle when I am in the bath too long? /answered

Postby p1t1o » Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:04 pm UTC

It feels like a simple question but I have no idea...

Osmosis would tend to draw water into the tissue, swelling it, but there seems to be a decrease in tissue volume?

Or does the skin itself expand, but the underlying tissues are unaffected?

**edit**
Nevermind, should have googled it first:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrinkle#W ... _wrinkling

tl;dr - I was right about the skin, but there is more to it apparently.

User avatar
HES
Posts: 4861
Joined: Fri May 10, 2013 7:13 pm UTC
Location: England

Re: Why does the skin on my fingers wrinkle when I am in the bath too long? /answered

Postby HES » Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:30 pm UTC

Interesting to see there's a recent study that didn't support the wet-grip evolutionary advantage idea.
He/Him/His Image

p1t1o
Posts: 856
Joined: Wed Nov 10, 2010 4:32 pm UTC
Location: London, UK

Re: Why does the skin on my fingers wrinkle when I am in the bath too long? /answered

Postby p1t1o » Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:55 pm UTC

HES wrote:Interesting to see there's a recent study that didn't support the wet-grip evolutionary advantage idea.


I've heard a similar theoretical response to the sweaty hands/feet you get when experiencing dizzying heights, the idea that it somehow makes the "fingerprint" texture of your hands/feet more prominent (and thus more "grippy") but I always figured it was quackery since - and I dont know about anyone else but - my hands get awful slippery when they are sweaty.


Return to “Science”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 9 guests