Your First Publication

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danpilon54
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Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Fri Jul 18, 2008 5:53 pm UTC

For all you research types. I just found out that I am going to be published for the first time ever :) (assuming the paper gets published, but my prof is awesome so I'm sure it will). I am an undergrad senior physics major so I am excited that this will greatly help my grad school applications. I designed and simulated a wide-angle, flexible, selective terahertz perfect absorber. We fabricated it and tested it and it works phenomenally. It got me wondering, for those of you with a publication record, what was the first project for which you were published and in which journal was it published?

I will link to the paper once it gets published :P

edit:
per request, here are some details:

Terahertz radiation (far-infrared) is a useful frequency range for many applications, since common materials such as plastics and wood are transparent to it, but things like explosives and drugs have unique signatures. This means its great for detection systems. The problem is normal materials do not react very well to terahertz radiation, ie absorb/reflect. To fill this "Terahertz Gap", we make structures called metamaterials, made of resonating gold rings on a semiconductor substrate. Since these structures are smaller than the wavelength of the light at which they are designed to resonate, they act as a smooth material with effective refractive index etc. We can tune these metamaterials to resonate at really any frequency we want. So basically i designed a metamaterial that would absorb 1.5 THz radiation at around 99.9%, and reflect every other frequency. The actual data was closer to 95%, but the highest experimental result for such frequencies before that was in the 70's. This particular absorber will be used in a terahertz detector that the engineering graduate student who fabricated the absorber is designing.

The terahertz detector will be particularly useful for every-day applications because in order to detect terahertz now, you need a highly aligned laser system, usually utilizing liquid helium. With the detector, you will be able to detect terahertz radiation at room temperature without a laser system.


also, I searched for a similar thread but was unable to find one, so forgive me if there is and I just missed it.
Last edited by danpilon54 on Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:59 pm UTC, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby Izawwlgood » Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:00 pm UTC

I recieved co-authorship for my work on two papers in a lab I worked at between 2004-2006.

I'd like to point out that most undergrad 'research' is NOT the same as publishing your own paper. I'm not sure what you did, or how much you wrote, but getting your name tacked on a paper because you tested some parameters or troubleshot some system or even did the grunt work of the experiments, does NOT equal writing your own publication.

The metaphor I'd like to use is a construction worker affixing girders and shit is NOT the architect of the building.

EDIT: SOrry, not to be an ass... It's still a really good experience to see the inner workings of HOW a paper gets written, so congrats, it does look phenomenal on a transcript, and it sure as hell beats having no lab experience.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:07 pm UTC

I know what you mean, and I don't think I will be doing the actual writing (my professor and grad students do most of that), but the project was basically my own. I came up with the idea for the design, simulated the design, gave the parameters to an engineer who fabricated it, and had a hand in the testing, but due to the nature of said testing, it had to be done at a different school. Not exactly totally my own project, but Ive heard of some undergrad research where the student does much much less. I don't consider it my own publication, but I definitely played my part.

This thread wasnt really to toot my own horn anyway, just wanted to hear about the kinds of research people are into.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby Izawwlgood » Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:15 pm UTC

If you came up with the design for the project, then it sounds like your work! That's neat. I'm not really familiar with what you described though, can you give more detail as to what exactly your research was/applies to?
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Fri Jul 18, 2008 6:35 pm UTC

edited with details ^^
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby Izawwlgood » Fri Jul 18, 2008 7:00 pm UTC

So you've created a material that is reflective to all frequencies of EMR except for infra-red? So it appears to be invisible in infra-red?

...


What can be done to shift the frequency absorption/reflection range? I recall reading something about nanoparticles that are perfectly transparent to microwaves but not to anything else... Maybe it was diamonds, diamonds are perfectly transparent to UV...

So... That's cool! Do you know if you have second/third/**primary** authorship on the paper the PI is putting out? It seems most PI's, having so many publications to their name, are unconcerned with order of publication so long as they are associated with the work.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Fri Jul 18, 2008 7:05 pm UTC

It would appear invisible if you are trying to "see" it using reflection, yes, but more importantly it can be used to detect that frequency by measuring the heat change in the structure due to absorption. You change the resonance frequency by changing the capacitance or inductance of the resonating rings. Think about it as an RLC circuit with an oscillating voltage. You get a resonant current at I = sqrt(1/LC) I believe. Since the capacitance and inductance are purely geometrical properties, they are easy to change.

Not sure about the order of authorship, probably my professor will be first, then the grad student who fabricated it and intends to use it in his detector after him, so I will be 3rd or 4th.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby qetzal » Fri Jul 18, 2008 9:04 pm UTC

danpilon54 wrote:Not sure about the order of authorship, probably my professor will be first, then the grad student who fabricated it and intends to use it in his detector after him, so I will be 3rd or 4th.


I'm in biology, so I'm not familiar with authorship conventions in your field. In my field, however, someone who did everything you describe would be first author (or should be, at least). Your concept, your design, fabricated to your specifications. Plus it sounds like worked really well - significantly better than the previous state of the art. The people who did the fabrication and subsequent testing would be 2nd, 3rd, etc., authors. Assuming the professor's role was to be head of the group, bring in the grant funds, give advice, etc., he would be "senior" (i.e. last) author.

The only caveat, in my field at least, would be that first author is normally the one who writes the paper as well. (Or leads the writing effort, if different people have to contribute different parts.)

OK, academic politics is another caveat, and it's more than enough to override everything else. But if I was your PI, based on what you describe, I'd be hard pressed to justify you being anything other than 1st author. You should be proud!

P.S. Will this be patented? If so, you should be one of the inventors. That's something they can't safely deny you. Inventorship is determined legally not politically. Knowingly omitting a bona fide inventor is grounds for denying/overturning a patent. Being an inventor on a patent application should be make a nice bullet on your grad school application as well. Whether it would entitle you to possible royalties depends on what if any contractual agreements you have with your prof & the university.

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Fri Jul 18, 2008 9:47 pm UTC

I can't see them making me first name. Maybe the engineer who fabricated it. Im really not sure how it works tho. The only reason I say hell probably get #1 is he was the one who needed a perfect absorber, and he fabricated it, and mostly handled the testing. Also, as I am an undergrad, theyre not going to let me do the writing :P. Im just happy having my name on anything.

As for patenting, I think we might. My prof mentioned patenting the absorbers we have made thus far as well as this, and I think my name will be on it. The only thing that could get in the way of that is Im on a UROP (undergraduate research opportunities program) grant, and they have some patent rights I think.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby jameswilliamogle » Sat Jul 19, 2008 4:26 am UTC

My first paper went to Chemical Communications as 2nd author, which is a secondary tier publication for organic and some other chemistries in general (excluding Science and/or Nature, since they're more general than chemistry; its just my opinion, though). We were examining a (then) new class of substrates for homogeneous non-coordinating catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation with dihydrogen. I mainly made the substrates with the highest selectivity in that paper. I was in grad school already at that point, and a 2nd year, and was 2nd of 3 authors.

Congrats on your pub! Sounds like you have gotten the bug... keep it up! Makes me wish I had gone to a school with real undergrad research instead of some of the crap I did then...

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby Sungura » Sat Jul 19, 2008 11:07 pm UTC

That's awesome!

I am in biochem, and based on my experience, first author did the most work and troublshooting and planning (which this sounds like it is you). Last author is the PI or top consultant (if a multi-lab project). Usually the second author did the most work except for the first author, and anyone else is jumbled in there.

I was supposed to have my name on a publication, I believe in the J of Orgo Chem, my freshman year of undergrad. I did all the computational chemistry for a project. We studied BMMG (an organic dye, basically two Malachite Green molecules stuck together) for use in photodynamic therapy. I did a presentation on it even, but unfortunately, the last bit of data needed before it could be sent off was in the hands of a grad student who just happened to finish their research and left the lab. So, it was put on the back burner and never published. :(

I do, however, have multiple publications. Just not in "peer-reviewed scientific journals". I study coat color genetics in rabbits, and as such, have publications in Domestic Rabbits (which would be the "top rabbit-world" publication). Doesn't exactly count in the same way though. But it did make for an interesting grad school app and spurred a lot of interview questions. That and the fact that I've worked in a research lab since I was a junior in high school. Not too many grad students come into the lab with experience like that. So having a paper on top of experience, I'd say you have no problem getting your pick of schools (assuming grades are at least decent). Me, I'm a 3.6 student (4.0 scale) but with the lab background it was no trouble. I even got into Purdue without even an interview, I was accepted on application alone. So you're well on your way, I wouldn't worry!

Now, I do want to advise that every paper your name is on make sure you have proof read and agree with BEFORE it is submitted. If your name is on the paper and something is wrong, it will fall on you as well. I don't care what your prof says - if your name is on the paper it is your responsibility to proof it and agree with what is written. Even if you don't get to do the actual writing - be sure to read it and "give your stamp of approval". I cannot stress this enough. Don't be afraid to speak up if you find something off or blatantly wrong. This is your career too.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby qetzal » Sun Jul 20, 2008 1:38 am UTC

danpilon54 wrote:I can't see them making me first name. Maybe the engineer who fabricated it. Im really not sure how it works tho. The only reason I say hell probably get #1 is he was the one who needed a perfect absorber, and he fabricated it, and mostly handled the testing. Also, as I am an undergrad, theyre not going to let me do the writing :P. Im just happy having my name on anything.

As for patenting, I think we might. My prof mentioned patenting the absorbers we have made thus far as well as this, and I think my name will be on it. The only thing that could get in the way of that is Im on a UROP (undergraduate research opportunities program) grant, and they have some patent rights I think.


Yeah, I agree getting to be 1st author would be an uphill battle, & it's good that you're happy to be a co-author. But you can still take pride that you probably deserved to be 1st author.

Did the fabrication require special skills, or could you have sent the designs to a contract fabrication place? If the latter, then it seems clear to me that conceiving and designing the device was much more critical than the fabrication. As for the testing, was there anything novel there, or was it pretty clear what was needed to see if the design worked?

Obviously, all I have to go on is your description, and you're outside of my field, so I'm doubly unqualified to really judge. But if you'd been another grad student in the prof's lab, don't you think you'd probably be 1st author?

As for the patent, there's a difference between who's an inventor, and who owns the rights. The latter is called the assignee. So yeah, the UROP thing may mean you have no chance at royalties. But if you played a key role in either conceiving the invention, or reducing it to practice (i.e. showing that it really works), you're an inventor. Your position in the group makes no difference. The people who made & tested the thing may not be inventors. Depends on whether fabrication and/or testing required any novel contributions, or used conventional techniques that were obvious.

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Sun Jul 20, 2008 10:06 pm UTC

qetzal wrote:Did the fabrication require special skills, or could you have sent the designs to a contract fabrication place? If the latter, then it seems clear to me that conceiving and designing the device was much more critical than the fabrication. As for the testing, was there anything novel there, or was it pretty clear what was needed to see if the design worked?


Yea the fabrication takes special skill. Im pretty sure he's one of the only people in the world right now able to fabricate such things to that great precision. That's good news about the patent rights tho. It would be awesome to get some royalties but at the moment Id be more concerned with just having my name on the thing :).

Good news though. Apparently its the engineer who will be writing the paper, not my professor, so Ill likely get second name.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby qetzal » Mon Jul 21, 2008 4:32 pm UTC

danpilon54 wrote:That's good news about the patent rights tho. It would be awesome to get some royalties but at the moment Id be more concerned with just having my name on the thing :).


Make sure you have good documentation of what you did to contribute to this. Ideally, you would have documented what you did at the time you did it, e.g. recording your designs, keeping notes in a bound notebook, dating and signing everything as it was completed, & having someone else sign and date as a witness.

At least, that's the standard approach for biotechnology. I realize the norms may be different for engineers, but the legal requirements still have to be met, or the patent may not be enforceable. If either the prof or the engineer has a patent app in mind, hopefully they've addressed this with you already. If not, you might consider asking them about it. Your university very likely has a patent office that deals with such things all the time, so even if the prof & engineer aren't sure about what's required, it should be easy for them to find out.

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby Izawwlgood » Mon Jul 21, 2008 4:39 pm UTC

I don't think the scientist at an institution is ever really privy to their patents, let alone the undergrad who did some work.

Your in the wrong field if you want to make money from scientific endeavor.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Mon Jul 21, 2008 5:35 pm UTC

which is why Im not too concerned with royalties, but it would be awesome to tell grad schools that I have a patent. The way we do things doesn't really jive with the whole recording and signing/dating everything approach, as we weren't trying to invent anything to be patented. I do, however, have all of the simulations etc. and everyone here knows I did them. I'm not too worried about it, I'm more concerned with getting published.

So anyone else have any publication stories? This post wasn't supposed to be all about me :P
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby seladore » Mon Jul 21, 2008 6:13 pm UTC

Doesn't the university you are working for automatically have intellectual property rights over all inventions made when employed by them?

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby sm_usagi » Mon Jul 21, 2008 6:47 pm UTC

The first paper my name was on was when I was a summer intern at an observatory - I was downstairs in the library of a telescope when the call came in upstairs to observe a gamma-ray burst afterglow for an event that had just happened. All the observers rostered on got on the paper, even though I didn't even hear about it until a few hours later when I went upstairs to get a cup of tea. :lol: My supervisor did make me reduce the data and analyze it in parallel with the actual analysis (which they were *not* going to let a summer intern do!), so I did some work, even though that work didn't contribute to the final paper.

The first paper I published as the first author was a discovery paper of the first example of a particular variable star in an eclipsing binary system.

I wish I was in a field were I could patent stuff though! That sounds awesome!! Congrats. :D

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Mon Jul 21, 2008 6:55 pm UTC

I'm sure the university has rights over all royalties, but I'm also pretty sure the inventors still get their name on the thing.

And gratz sm_usagi on the publications. That sounds really cool. I wrote a paper on gamma ray bursts for an astronomy writing class that a took. Definitely a very cool topic.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby Izawwlgood » Mon Jul 21, 2008 7:30 pm UTC

I was placed on two publications while working at Northwestern (myyyessss) both of which I did a good deal of grunt work for but couldn't really talk about the paper beyond a superficial level. They definitely helped me with subsequent bio related endeavors.

One of them purportedly had relations to a new birth control drug for women, that's in testing now, that's cool.

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby RockoTDF » Fri Jul 25, 2008 1:02 am UTC

Just got accepted today, actually!!

It's a paper we wrote 2 years ago about military dependents (sons and daughters of those in the military) going to the military academies in the US. I'm the primary author. We found that 50% of USMA, ~30% of USNA, and 26% of USAFA cadets (or midshipmen) are military brats. Still working to refine the statistics though. Its in the Journal on Educational Psychology, will be out in late august.

My research interests have shifted away from social science research towards the lab based stuff within the psych dept....so I work with fish and computational analysis stuff now. Working on a few things in there.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Fri Jul 25, 2008 1:17 am UTC

Sounds really interesting and congrats on the publication and being first author! Is that your first?
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby RockoTDF » Fri Jul 25, 2008 1:28 am UTC

danpilon54 wrote:Sounds really interesting and congrats on the publication and being first author! Is that your first?


Thanks!

Yep. Started the project as a freshman, really beat it to death with different presentations, etc. It got to be kind of a bore after a while, especially as my interests shifted. I'm applying for grad school in the cognitive/computational neuroscience field in the fall. I'm so glad its (pretty much) over!
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby hitokiriilh » Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:40 pm UTC

Rising 4th year undergrad physics/math major. Worked at NASA for 4 years. Co-developed an acoustic modality of the atomic force microscope, the rdf-afum, and an analytical model of cantilever tip-sample surface interaction dynamics 3 years ago.

First publication: First author, "Nanoscale subsurface imaging via resonant difference frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy", Journal of Applied Physics - experimental paper.

Second: Second author, "Analytical model of the nonlinear dynamics of cantilever tip-sample surface interactions for various acoustic atomic force microscopies", Phys. Rev. B - theoretical paper.

Invention disclosure has been issued for the apparatus and a patent is pending.

Working on a paper involving wave propagation in and thermal and mechanics properties of a nonlinear material with stochastically vibrating lattice points. Not sure when it'll be finished. Been too lazy to write a program to calculate the thermal expansion coefficients from the modal nonlinearity parameters in the model...

Not really the areas of research I ultimately want to go into, but I worked with the positions I was given. Hopefully some phenomenology and fundamental research will come my way in grad school.

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby hitokiriilh » Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:44 pm UTC

sm_usagi wrote:The first paper my name was on was when I was a summer intern at an observatory - I was downstairs in the library of a telescope when the call came in upstairs to observe a gamma-ray burst afterglow for an event that had just happened. All the observers rostered on got on the paper, even though I didn't even hear about it until a few hours later when I went upstairs to get a cup of tea. :lol: My supervisor did make me reduce the data and analyze it in parallel with the actual analysis (which they were *not* going to let a summer intern do!), so I did some work, even though that work didn't contribute to the final paper.

The first paper I published as the first author was a discovery paper of the first example of a particular variable star in an eclipsing binary system.

I wish I was in a field were I could patent stuff though! That sounds awesome!! Congrats. :D


That sounds freaking epic. <3 astrophysics and astronomy. Congratumacations!

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Tue Jul 29, 2008 11:19 pm UTC

Wow very impressive. How did you do all that when you were a freshman/sophomore. I didn't know near enough at that age to do anything close. I probably dont even know enough now...
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby hitokiriilh » Wed Jul 30, 2008 12:15 am UTC

danpilon54 wrote:Wow very impressive. How did you do all that when you were a freshman/sophomore. I didn't know near enough at that age to do anything close. I probably dont even know enough now...


Thanks. =) It probably sounds a lot more impressive than it actually is. The key was that the atomic force microscope is mostly studied by materials scientists and engineers, which essentially means most of the people working with it don't know what the hell they're doing (bad hand-wavey explanations that assume linear interactions left and right, throwing their hands up and saying 'gah, nonlinearities have foiled me again', no command of advanced math, etc).

The first paper just amounted to getting a transducer, putting it under the sample in question, driving the cantilever at a frequency differing from drive frequency of the transducer, and realizing the interaction force (casimir, van der waals, etc) is nonlinear. I trained for 2 years prior on the AFM thanks to a highschool mentorship program, so I already had the technical training. Everything else was just technician work and applying a few equations to the images I got.

The second paper wasn't that conceptually demanding. If you knew how to do Taylor expansions and F=ma then the only novel thing about the paper was showing that continuous media locally satisfying point-particle-like equations of motion and developing a rapidly-converging matrix iteration method (not unlike what one sees in perturbation theory) for solving the coupled equations of motion (coupled since cantilever tip and sample-surface were involved after all). Everything else was just the most tedious algebra you can imagine...I'm still cringing over it. The article turned out to be 16 pages I think - that's after formatting. 100+ equations...yeah, it's not a happy thing to look at, but it is literally all-encompassing. I doubt it will get cited much because most people (read: most engineers and especially materials scientists) crap themselves when they see math, even if it's the only way to do what you really want to do. It's kind of funny because I was asked to give a presentation to the branch I was working with and it was requested that I just "try to emphasize the pretty pictures and cut down on the equations - most of the people won't understand them anyway," - verbatim quote. Yeah, I'm pretty disenchanted with NASA. ;)

Edit: Oh, and I thought I said congrats to you, but upon rereading I did no such thing - sorry for being such a jerk! Congrats, danpilon! =)

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby BeerBottle » Wed Jul 30, 2008 9:38 am UTC

hitokiriilh, not to be a cyber stalker or anything, but is the other author on your papers with the same name as your father?

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby hitokiriilh » Wed Jul 30, 2008 1:59 pm UTC

No problem.

Seems kind of gauche, but yes. He originally wasn't going to be involved in the project, but the branch thought it would be a good idea since he's the center's local expert on nonlinearity. It's not a shadey deal though.

My contribution to the first paper: I actually assembled all the equipment to try to replicate a similar acoustic modality developed by Dravid et al, realized the signal is enhanced by utilizing contact resonances, and did all of the experiments - confirming the signal was generated by nonlinearity, obtaining micrographcs, etc. I also calculated the % variation in the phase from the micrographs to be used in the calculation of the % elastic moduli variation.

Contribution to the second paper: I developed the matrix iteration method and showed that continuous media locally satisfy point-particle like equations of motion (reducing a 4th order equation of motion to a 2nd order when it comes to applying this to the cantilever). I also pointed out that a resonance in the context of a continuous medium isn't the same as a resonance for a spring (one merely establishes a stable standing wave, the other maximizes an amplitude) and proposed treating the cantilever as an effective superposition of springs (nothing glorious, basically a fourier series with non-integer multiple frequencies).

I feel like I have to defend myself any time someone asks 'is that your dad'. >.<

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Wed Jul 30, 2008 6:47 pm UTC

I felt the same way when I got an internship at a company my dad was like vice president of. He had no say in the intern selection process and could not even ask what the status of the decision was for fear of looking like he was interfering. I always hate it when people jump to conclusions. I ended up saving the company 10's of thousands of dollars a year on helium.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby hitokiriilh » Wed Jul 30, 2008 7:48 pm UTC

danpilon54 wrote:I felt the same way when I got an internship at a company my dad was like vice president of. He had no say in the intern selection process and could not even ask what the status of the decision was for fear of looking like he was interfering. I always hate it when people jump to conclusions. I ended up saving the company 10's of thousands of dollars a year on helium.


Yay, someone who understands my plight!

That's friggin' impressive though. 10's of thousands sounds like a hefty mint to me. =)

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby danpilon54 » Thu Jul 31, 2008 1:00 am UTC

It wasnt anything special, but probably wouldnt have happened if I wasnt there. I got them to take a piece of a equipment off the draw tower (fiber optics company) that blows helium onto the freshly drawn fiber. I determined the process was unnecessary for the draw speeds we were at, so they took it down. No more helium blown on fiber.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby ks_physicist » Thu Jul 31, 2008 9:27 am UTC

Grr. I went to a school where there was no real research going on, and consequently no opportunity for undergraduates to get involved.

Had I only known that before hand...and how important it would turn out to be...I would either have gone elsewhere, or switched to a chemistry major, a department where they DID do research and DID involve undergrads.


*fumes*

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby hitokiriilh » Thu Jul 31, 2008 2:04 pm UTC

danpilon54 wrote:It wasnt anything special, but probably wouldnt have happened if I wasnt there. I got them to take a piece of a equipment off the draw tower (fiber optics company) that blows helium onto the freshly drawn fiber. I determined the process was unnecessary for the draw speeds we were at, so they took it down. No more helium blown on fiber.


Still sounds like a big deal from where I'm sitting. =) At any rate, seems like your CV is sitting pretty right now.

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby MillerTime » Sun Aug 03, 2008 4:56 pm UTC

I wrote a paper as a sophomore at a very small college about Community Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA), but the sample size that we used wasn't big enough to refute the test that hospitals and doctors offices have had in place for years even though our results showed that they could be missing 1 in 20 people that had CA-MRSA that was not yet virulent, so it never got anywhere. I guess 300 people isn't enough to say hey ummm maybe you should swab both nostrils instead of just 1, bunch of lazy fools.

Also congrats on your work man.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby studyinserendipity » Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:38 am UTC

a couple people mentioned UROP, which is awesome - research isn't emphasized enough in my fields (music and education); I actually just took my first course in research methods, 4 years after UROP gave me the chance to try my hand at it. I guess I technically got published, but it's online and specifically FOR undergrad research, so I kinda don't believe it counts. Although I still flaunt it on my resume!

http://www.unh.edu/inquiryjournal/05/articles/west.htm

It's about finding developmentally appropriate music for young children from multiple world cultures. When I started teaching my interest in research was put on the back burner, but I'm getting back into it. I'm currently trying to put together publications on two different action research projects I did this year, one on the use of food in early childhood classrooms and the other on teaching music notation. It's tricky since I don't have a mentor to help me edit and I'd really like to get into a peer-reviewed journal (especially the music study). Not to hijack the thread, but maybe some of you who have some more published experience have some helpful pointers/tips?
(danpilon54 let me know if this is infringing on your rights as thread creator - and congrats btw. can't say I understand what your research means, but it sounds fascinating :))
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby sm_usagi » Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:24 pm UTC

Studiinserendipity: did you do the music research under/along with someone who might be able to help but obviously isn't directly a mentor? Or is there anyone you can approach in the field to ask for advice (and maybe gain a mentor in the process?) Otherwise I would take my cue from the currently published articles in the appropriate journals - read a bunch to get a feel for what is important to include and what not so much. Also, if you submit to a peer-reviewed journal, obviously a 'peer' will read it and probably give you feedback about what could be changed, although I understand wanting it to be perfect first time round!

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Re: Your First Publication

Postby studyinserendipity » Wed Aug 13, 2008 6:44 pm UTC

sm_usagi wrote:Studiinserendipity: did you do the music research under/along with someone who might be able to help but obviously isn't directly a mentor? Or is there anyone you can approach in the field to ask for advice (and maybe gain a mentor in the process?) Otherwise I would take my cue from the currently published articles in the appropriate journals - read a bunch to get a feel for what is important to include and what not so much. Also, if you submit to a peer-reviewed journal, obviously a 'peer' will read it and probably give you feedback about what could be changed, although I understand wanting it to be perfect first time round!


Thanks for the advice :) My original project was done under a professor who is unfortunately no longer working at the university, and I can't seem to find her. But I talked with the head music librarian who was really helpful, and apparently they're adding a new faculty member to the music department who has done research with early childhood music classes - so I'm trying to get in touch with her & keeping my fingers crossed that she'll at least read over my stuff.
Also, another professor has suggested I publish another paper I wrote about board books, and she's agreed to read over what I have before I submit it and offered some journal titles that might take it. So everything is going well so far!
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby markkat » Thu Aug 14, 2008 2:04 pm UTC

danpilon54 wrote:I'm sure the university has rights over all royalties, but I'm also pretty sure the inventors still get their name on the thing.


From what I know, the institution typically shares the rights and royalties. At least that's how it goes where I am at. -It's worth keeping your nose in the patent process. If you play the role you describe, it might be worth your while. At any rate, congratulations on the pub.

My first pub was as an undergraduate physics major as well: Modeling Elasticity in Crystal Growth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245701 (2002). The title says it all.

I had a fantastic undergrad research experience. Now I work on brains.
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Re: Your First Publication

Postby studyinserendipity » Thu Aug 14, 2008 3:14 pm UTC

markkat wrote:I had a fantastic undergrad research experience. Now I work on braaiinnnsss. BRAAAIIINNSSS! [shambles about]

fix'd.
Even researchers are not immune to zombification, apparently. :)
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