Reading many switches with few pins

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mikeonsixstrings
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Reading many switches with few pins

Postby mikeonsixstrings » Sun Nov 09, 2008 5:25 pm UTC

I was recently considering ways of referencing many switches from a few pins on a microcontroller, as in a keyboard or similar. It occurred to me to place the switches such that they would route current through different resistances:
Image

This should be possible as long as the resistances were determined in such a way that each possible sum of them would be unique.

So for the sums of any number of resistances A and B, A != B.

I created a few series and it seems that any geometric series would work: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32

It seemed cubes and higher powers of arithmetic series were also possible: 1, 8, 27, 64, 125
That may have been an overzealous extrapolation of Fermat's Last.

I imagine issues would arise from voltage resolution rather quickly, especially if low tolerance resistances were used. I would estimate that a single pin should be able to handle 6 switches comfortably however. Standard matrix-scanning setups with n pins have a switch-to-pin ratio of n/4. This method would have a constant switch-to-pin ratio of 6, which is much improved unless dealing with upwards of 24 pins, or 144 switches. The two techniques could even be combined, offering a 3n/2 switch to pin ratio. This third alternative would produce (3/2)*n^2 switches, a phenomenal increase in density over the (1/4)*n^2 of using a matrix alone.

Has anyone heard of prior implementation of this method?

Also, mathematically, what are some ways one could determine an ideal series of resistances?

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Goemon
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby Goemon » Sun Nov 09, 2008 5:50 pm UTC

If you have a moderately expensive car which has switches on the steering wheel for speed control and/or operating the radio or other systems, you've seen this method at work :)

Since the steering wheel can typically rotate one or more full turns in each direction, it's not easy to get wires from the wheel mounted switches to the body of the car. It's done using a "clockspring", a device that's basically a big spring which wraps around the steering column shaft. The spring gets wrapped more tightly when turning the wheel in one direction, and loosens in the opposite direction. Obviously, it has to have enough turns initially to accomodate the full range of motion of the wheel.

It's much more difficult to build a reliable clock spring that has multiple wires in it. So the system is designed exactly like you proposed - with a group of resistors on the steering wheel that get connected in various combinations to the clockspring according to which buttons you push. An integrated circuit on the body side interprets the signals and performs the corresponing function.
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ks_physicist
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby ks_physicist » Mon Nov 10, 2008 3:26 am UTC

I guess my Plymouth Neon is "moderately expensive" then. :D

Five switches control the cruise functions (on, off, set, cancel, resume), but only one signal line (and a common ground). They use similar logic to the original poster's--resistances that do not duplicate in combinations.

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Minerva
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby Minerva » Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:30 am UTC

Here's a schematic that a friend of mine designed that implements this technique.
(It's a fancy, elaborate stepper motor controller for a CNC milling machine, before anyone asks.)

(Fairly large image does 900 damage.)

http://imagestore.ugbox.net/image/steps ... 17a850.jpg
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MarvinM
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby MarvinM » Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:43 pm UTC

If you only needed a matrix style input, IE one key at once, then using a power line that was +V on one phase and -V on the other, then you could move to 2D scanning with diodes (only doubles the number of switches if you want to know the state of every switch). If you added capacitors you could scan in 3D, final voltage on one phase is the X final voltage on the second phase is the Y and the time constant getting there is the Z. There's more! By adding another diode and a resistor you can give it a different time constant in one direction to another for 4D scanning. By this point you need a capacitor, 3 resistors and 3 diodes for each button which probably makes it cheaper to use a PIC and serial communications. That's potentially over a thousand keyboard style buttons (or 24 switches if you need to know the state of every one individually) multiplexed onto one output pin though. Want to go crazy and add an inductor for 5D, two inductors (each direction one in series with a diode) for 6D scanning? Of course all of this increases the workload of the MCU and you need more samples over a longer period to extract all the information. If you want the ultimate in state of every switch on one line, then maybe instead of feeding DC voltages you could feed white-noise, or a chirp and have many RC circuits on every switch and get the states from the resulting pattern of harmonics. In two directions with diodes and DC offsets and both directions and resistors muaahaha and 87D billion trillion wooha quadrilli

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eternauta3k
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby eternauta3k » Tue Nov 11, 2008 7:01 pm UTC

This technique is used by lego enthusiasts to multiplex touch sensors (link)
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Solt
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby Solt » Tue Nov 11, 2008 10:57 pm UTC

Pretty cool (and clever), though it requires a dedicated ADC pin and a bit of extra code.
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evilbeanfiend
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby evilbeanfiend » Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:44 am UTC

effectively what you are doing is implementing a DAC
in ur beanz makin u eveel

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thoughtfully
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby thoughtfully » Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:48 pm UTC

A good point. It might be worthwhile to use a cheap DAC chip instead, since your resistances will be more precisely controlled, and there would be fewer components. Something like this, perhaps.
Image
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Solt
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby Solt » Thu Nov 13, 2008 3:27 am UTC

evilbeanfiend wrote:effectively what you are doing is implementing a DAC


Good point. In a binary representation of a decimal number, every combination of states in binary has a unique number.

In fact (correct me if I'm wrong), that tells you the maximum resolution of this strategy. An 8 bit ADC has a maximum resolution of 1 in 28 = 256. 8 switches have 256 possible states. Assuming you have no noise, then, the maximum number of switches is the resolution of the encoder.

You can get far higher densities using 100% digital components, if you were so inclined, but you'd probably need at least one extra pin to use as a clock.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,

produced a more reliable product. But sailors do

not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a

most annoying habit of splitting in two."

-J.W. Morris

mikeonsixstrings
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby mikeonsixstrings » Fri Nov 14, 2008 10:30 pm UTC

evilbeanfiend wrote:effectively what you are doing is implementing a DAC

Excellent point. Using a DAC also simplifies code greatly, as the function between the digital input and voltage output is linear. So if one used the 8-bit DAC you suggest, I suppose the question is what sort of processor time would one consume using an Analog pin on a microcontroller (including the calculations) versus, say, some sort of serial input?

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Solt
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Re: Reading many switches with few pins

Postby Solt » Sat Nov 15, 2008 4:03 am UTC

mikeonsixstrings wrote:
evilbeanfiend wrote:effectively what you are doing is implementing a DAC

Excellent point. Using a DAC also simplifies code greatly, as the function between the digital input and voltage output is linear. So if one used the 8-bit DAC you suggest, I suppose the question is what sort of processor time would one consume using an Analog pin on a microcontroller (including the calculations) versus, say, some sort of serial input?


I think you'd save a lot of processor time and probably a lot of code. Once you get the value from the ADC, you just have to save it then look at the bits you are interested in. It would be almost no burden on either resource. Of course, you have to add more hardware.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,

produced a more reliable product. But sailors do

not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a

most annoying habit of splitting in two."

-J.W. Morris


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