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Re: Science Websites

Posted: Fri May 14, 2010 3:03 pm UTC
by Coffee
Virtual Biology lab located here. http://bio.rutgers.edu/~gb101/virtuallabs_101.html

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Mon Jun 28, 2010 10:27 am UTC
by The Pigeons' Rule
Einstein's Archives:

http://www.alberteinstein.info/

A lot of scanned manuscripts by the man.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 10:33 am UTC
by RMgX
I am going to list some of the databases I believe people should know about and probably have access to if they are at a university. + some other stuff.

Chemistry. Free stuff.

http://www.webelements.com/ Element information CAS-Registry numbers, NMR properties etc. I used it mainly for the NMR properties (left hand column)

http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/technical-service-home/product-catalog.html Lots of data and for common and not so common chemicals.

http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ Sort of a free (but not as good) Registry database.

Chemistry. Someone has to pay a small fortune for these, but if you have access to a university computer or library chances are they have. If you are masters student or going for a PhD, learn how to use these, they will increase your productivity by a significant amount compared to Google Scholar (which is still a great and free complement due to the ability to search in full text sometimes) and they are a great way to find out what research groups are doing interesting stuff. There is a reason your library is paying for these databases. The same applies to the commercial general ones.

https://scifinder.cas.org/ The best database for chemistry articles and patents (more new compounds are indexed from patents than from articles, no reason to limit yourself), great refinement options etc, reaction searching, structure searching, you name it. It is also the largest chemical compound database in the world. You probably have to create an account for this and most likely your university only has a very limited amount of simultaneous users. Uses controlled terminology

https://www.reaxys.com Contains Beilstein and I believe Gmelin. And have been supplemented with various patents and quick synthesis descriptions (these are great), great resource for chemical properties. Very good tools for making schemes of multi step reactions. Not so good for text searching as they do not use controlled terminology.

http://www.hbcpnetbase.com/ CRC handbook. You probably have one lying around in the lab.

General .
http://www.harzing.com/pop.htm interface for google scholar making certain searches a lot easier.

http://www.scirus.com Elseviers free database.

http://www.espacenet.com/index.en.htm A free and very good resource for patents. Do realize that most people want to hide their patents. If they get away with it, the document will be named: A new device. Learn to use IPC NCL and ECLA codes if you want to be really efficient. You can manage going through uni without being able to search patents but why not get that extra edge. There is also often the option of finding English language equivalents for patents in other languages.
General but commercial. If you have access to a university library or a university ip-adress chances are good you can access these. If you have access to these databases learn to use them instead of google scholar especially if you are in natural sciences or medicine. Getting 900 hits sorting them by numbers of citations, then picking only the review articles from the last 5 years in a language you can read is superior to wading through the hits in Google scholar.

http://apps.isiknowledge.com/ Web of science. If you have access to it use it instead of google scholar The sorting options and refinement options are so worth it, Chances are you can also access myendnoteweb, to upload all your references directly

http://www.scopus.com The commercial Elsevier competitor of web of science. Web of science is better for older stuff but Scopus contains a large portion of Compendex which is one of the best engineering databases out there and also more non English journals. Use the add categories option to be able to sort between keywords, document types etc.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:39 pm UTC
by m4d4sb34ns
Here's a set of the science-realted stuff I've bookmarked over the last year. I've used most of the chemistry stuff myself, the others are mostly video lectures that looked like they could be fairly interesting.

Molinspiration - chemical editing program built into the browser, with the capability to produce some basic descriptors
NMR Basics - some notes on the theory behind NMR. People in need of a real textbook on this subject should look for "Spin Dynamics" by Levitt
Zeolite Structure Database - could be useful to anyone working in solid-state chemistry
Skylaris Lectures - lectures on QM and computational chemistry from my old uni
Design of Experiments - again from my old uni, some notes about applying statistical techniques to experiment planning
Maths Lectures - haven't tried these yet, but the short lectures could be good for picking up a partigular topic
Stanford ChemEng Lectures - I've watched the first one of these and was impressed by the lecturing
ComSci and Programming Video Lectures - another one I hope to try soon

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:42 pm UTC
by joy
Economics is not a hard science, but if anyone would like a lighter approach to the dismal science check out:

http://www.economnomnomics.com

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:40 pm UTC
by Sleipner
Biology (and epigenetics, but that wasn't covered too long):
http://www.weinersmith.com/

I'll admit, its mostly a blog, but the blogger (who is incidentally married to my second-favorite webcomic artist) is herself a biologist based in California.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 7:02 pm UTC
by Solifuge
One of my professors shared this place: http://www.becominghuman.org/

It charts the proposed course of human evolution, with links to relevant essays, fossil evidence, genetics research, etc. The news blog also charts new archaeological finds related to human development, evolution, and culture too. Pretty neat stuff!

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 7:26 pm UTC
by garak1a
I recently bought an iPod, and have fallen in love with listening to podcasts.

Does anyone know of any good, still-running podcasts on science? Ideally biology, but general science is good too?

I'm in a job where my biology undergrad degree is essential, but not actually used very often, so I'd love to keep my scientific knowledge sharp via listening to weekly or monthly podcasts while on the go.

I already subscribe to Quirks and Quarks (general science), White Coat, Black Art (medicine and medical practise), and Spark (tech), all from CBC Radio, but iTunes store wasn't too helpful trying to find still-running biology podcasts. So if anyone knows of a good one, I'd appreciate it!

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 4:57 pm UTC
by topquark
www.physicsforums.com is proving invaluable to me during my phd. It's full of wonderful wonderful people who will explain concepts to you. :D

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:59 pm UTC
by Coffee
Here's a free marine biology online journal.
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jmb/

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Sat Jun 11, 2011 8:04 pm UTC
by aoeu

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 3:29 pm UTC
by theboss
www.parascientifica.com and www.parascientifica.com/forums
Its a nice small news site with some science discussion.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Mon Jul 18, 2011 12:59 pm UTC
by timbot
garak1a wrote:I recently bought an iPod, and have fallen in love with listening to podcasts.

Does anyone know of any good, still-running podcasts on science? Ideally biology, but general science is good too?


Not a biology specific podcast but I really love the (Australian) ABC Science show.
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/scienceshow/

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 3:50 pm UTC
by Crabik
Solar Physicist Leif Svalgaard
http://www.leif.org/research/

Solarham - All of your solar and aurora needs in one place
http://www.solarham.com/

LuboŇ° Motl - theoretical physicist (blog about physics, global warming and politics)
http://motls.blogspot.com/

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 2:54 pm UTC
by Radium
I'd also suggest adding Academic Earth (http://academicearth.org/subjects/) to the General section of the list. ^_^

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Nov 01, 2011 5:49 pm UTC
by Angua
http://www.copewithcytokines.de/cope.cgi

Cytokines and cells pathfinder encyclopedia. It has references for them, well organised, and pretty detailed.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Wed Dec 14, 2011 4:20 am UTC
by Mighty Flaming Frying Pan
www.ptable.com

Another periodic table website. Made out of HTML5, it has a wealth of information about each element; properties, orbitals, melting/boiling points, and a lot more. Good for chemistry/physics/anywhere you use elements.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 2:59 am UTC
by Samsoneffect
Didn't see it listed anywhere, but Sixty Symbols is a nice little repository of videos on physics topics, brought to you by University of Nottingham.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu May 03, 2012 3:38 pm UTC
by Tabasco
hideki101 wrote:http://www.nasa.gov/ -- National Aeronautics and Space Administration

FTFY.

Geology
http://www.usgs.gov/ - tons of great resources (maps, earthquakes, volcanoes, info) ... and related:
http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/ - geology of celestial bodies

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 10:36 am UTC
by theboss
www.trulyscience.com, something that I've set up this summer. It is a general science site, explaining science :P
It's still young, but I hope that it will become much larger soon.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 3:28 pm UTC
by tomandlu
http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/evohome.html

Looks like a good evolution resource for teachers.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Apr 11, 2013 4:31 pm UTC
by mittfh
Brady Haran (who films Periodic Videos) also has a number of other YouTube channels in collaboration with other departments at Nottingham:

Sixty Symbols (physics)
Numberphile (mathematics)
Deep Sky Videos (astronomy / deep space)
Psy File (Psychology - University of Manchester)
Words of the World (languages / etymologies)
Bibledex (theology / books of the Bible)
Foodskey (food science)
Nottingham Science (behind the scenes - aka Test Tube)
Backstage Science (back stage at UK science facilities)

Phew!

Assorted science channels by others:

Minute Physics (Henry Reich, short animated videos about physics)
Minute Earth (Henry again, his new channel)
Minute Mandolin (Not science, but Henry's mandolin improvisations)
Vi Hart (self-described "Mathemusician")
Veritasium (Science vlog - "An element of truth")
Smarter Every Day (Another science vlog - the ad revenue goes into his children's college fund)
The Slow Mo Guys (Slow motion photography)
C G P Grey (not strictly science, explanation videos on a variety of subjects, most of the others follow him)
Vsauce (facts, often science-y)
Brusspup (optical illusions)

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Sat May 25, 2013 1:39 am UTC
by NucleoSynth
Some science video dedicated sites
videosci[dot]com
sciencehack[dot]com
openculture[dot]com/science_videos

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 5:24 pm UTC
by addams
http://www.livescience.com/17106-scienc ... -2011.html

Science is Pretty.
Even if I don't know what it is.

Waves of Air. I know what Waves of air are.
It's still Pretty.

I am willing to Argue:
It is More Beautiful for Those that Know Air and Water are Both Fluids.
They Mix Delightfully.

Like Peas and Carrots.
Spoiler:
Where do you draw The Line between air and water?

When You can see it? Clouds are air? Clouds are water?
We are Looking for Other Planets.
We are doing that because we don't like The Weather on Our Own Planet?

We have Great Weather! We want to Send People out there?
I think it is Somewhat Irresponsible. Have you met People?

We need and like water. We have water here.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 10:27 am UTC
by Sebastiaan
I think PLOS ONE would be a nice addition. It's an open access, peer-reviewed journal that accepts primary research from any field. If you don't have access to restricted-access journals, then this is a great journal to scan for interesting articles. There's even a reader's comment section, although it's hardly used properly.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Fri Jul 25, 2014 4:45 am UTC
by Kristen23
One science website I use as a part of the curriculum is this one which has something known as a Hiccup's Science Workshop with plenty of interesting science news, worksheets, science fair projects and the like. The best part about it is the Science experiments for kids videos which feature simple do-it-yourself experiments one can carry out at home.

Btw, thanks for all the great resources mentioned in this thread..will really help me out.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Jan 28, 2016 7:08 pm UTC
by johnypea
Life science search engine with lots of graphs: scicurve[dot]com

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Mon Feb 22, 2016 8:02 am UTC
by addams
timbot wrote:
garak1a wrote:I recently bought an iPod, and have fallen in love with listening to podcasts.

Does anyone know of any good, still-running podcasts on science? Ideally biology, but general science is good too?


Not a biology specific podcast but I really love the (Australian) ABC Science show.
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/scienceshow/

The Infinite Monkey Cage where Science and the British Humor dance.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00snr0 ... /downloads

Science Friday from the USA.
http://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/

SciFri has been redecorated.
You may need to click a bit to find an area of interest.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:45 pm UTC
by elasto
Many of The Guardian's science podcasts are really interesting. Basically pop-science but still informative.

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 2:11 am UTC
by Internetmeme
Aint no web book like the NIST web book:

http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/

You want the heat capacity of some obscure compounds that literally nobody cares about? They got that shit.

You want an IR spectrum of some bullshit so angry that it explodes at some stupidly low oxygen concentration? They got that shit.

You want computed rotational or vibrational constants for a common material? They don't got that shit.
Spoiler:
But the motherfucking NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark DataBase does got that shit.

http://cccbdb.nist.gov/rotcalc1.asp

Re: Science Websites

Posted: Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:41 pm UTC
by Heimhenge
I humbly submit my own weekly blog http://www.sky-lights.org. Focus is mainly on earth and space science. And I take questions.