Build a small electric shock device

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Build a small electric shock device

Postby insperatum » Sat Oct 24, 2009 10:53 pm UTC

Hey,
I'd like to go about building a device that I could hook up to, say, my finger to administer a small electric shock whenever a button is pressed. I'm guessing just a normal battery and a transformer would do.

How can I do this, and how safe would it be? Also, how easy would it be to make the button remote (wireless) from the actual shocker? Can you just buy cheap components for that?

Cheers,
Luke
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby silvermace » Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:01 am UTC

I don't know much but couldn't you just take one of those prank phones from a party store that shocks youw hen you open it? then just fix it up a bit to do what you want, you'd know more about that than I would
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby explodingviolin » Sun Oct 25, 2009 5:25 am UTC

You could always make a taser out of a disposable camera...(literally, just google that "make a taser out of a disposable camera"), but it would really really hurt. "Hurt" as in "trying to pinch out a match flame with your fingers soaked in ethanol." It's closer to being "douche-y" and honestly painful than "prank-y" and resulting in a surprised yet amused reaction. Test it on yourself and you'll know what I mean.
For "prank-y" purposes, disassemble a barbecue lighter. Discard everything except a small rectangular component with a girth about the size of a normal wooden pencil. That's a piezo device used to ignite the butane when you use the lighter. Just lead out the wires to wherever you want. The best spark gap will be between .1 and .75 cm. This hurts a lot less, about the same as...um...idk poking yourself sharply with a paper clip. lol again, test it on yourself and you'll know what I mean.

Size really isn't an issue for either of them since you can always just route wires into your sleeves. (Granted, the first option is much larger and you'll have to insulate the entire board since the slightest wrong movement could cause it to discharge onto yourself and possibly fry any electrical devices you're carrying near it. The second one is activated by squeezing the piezo device; much easier than modding the camera circuit board to charge and discharge in one loop.) You'll have to wrangle something to make sure that it doesnt discharge onto yourself at the fingertip, but that's a fairly elementary problem, and I've solved it in the past by just extending the wires 1 inch away from myself. Oh, and make sure you have fairly thick insulation on the wires, I've had a spark jump right through thin rubber insulation, shorting it out before it gets to the gap you want it to spark across.

IMHO, forget the battery and the transformer. If you're going to get that complicated, just go with the disposable camera board - it has a battery and transformer built in, and is much easier to zap someone with once you get the circuit loop right. To make the button absolutely wireless would take...some wireless transmission devices. Stick with routing wires through your sleeves unless you're fairly or very experienced with electronics.
Everything should be completely safe, unless your target 1) is soaked in flammable liquids, 1.5) is using a leaking tank of butane, methane, ethanol, hydrogen, etc as a pillow, 2) has a pacemaker, 3) is prone to epileptic seizures, or possibly 4) all of the above.
Hydrostatic equilibrium makes the world go round.
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby Minerva » Sun Oct 25, 2009 8:06 am UTC

If you disassemble a disposable camera's flash, it's possible you'll get shocked by the still-charged capacitor if you touch its leads.

That'll teach you to trifle with forces you can't possibly understand.
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby You, sir, name? » Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:31 pm UTC

Minerva wrote:That'll teach you to trifle with forces you can't possibly understand.


The electrostatic force?
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby mouseposture » Sun Oct 25, 2009 10:24 pm UTC

You, sir, name? wrote:
Minerva wrote:That'll teach you to trifle with forces you can't possibly understand.


The electrostatic force?


Know what R on T is? No? But you know what the Darwin Awards are, right?
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby explodingviolin » Sun Oct 25, 2009 10:44 pm UTC

Minerva wrote:If you disassemble a disposable camera's flash, it's possible you'll get shocked by the still-charged capacitor if you touch its leads.

That'll teach you to trifle with forces you can't possibly understand.


Just be careful and use common sense. And the shock isn't life-threatening. Just know your limits - if you're an epileptic, have a pacemaker, or have heart problems associated with or leading to arrhythmia, just don't be working with shock devices in the first place.

I've disassembled disposable cameras before, and with a minimum of being careful you never even need to get shocked.. Just discharge the capacitor right before you open it up by using the flash, and you'll be fine. Failing that, short out the leads right after you open it up. A old screwdriver or pair of insulated pliers works perfectly. My friends who have been less careful and did in fact get shocked merely said that it was painful and not a happy experience, but hardly something to discourage them from trying to figure out how things work.

Furthermore, I'd hardly call it a force you can't understand; 1) There are markings on the capacitor that tell you the exact specs of them are; 2) any high school physics course will give you a good understanding of the principles behind capacitors. We're talking stored electricity here, not a loose thermonuclear bomb.

There are dangerous things that really ought not to be tried, like disassembling a microwave machine while it's still operating, and there are less dangerous things that you can try and learn a lot from without risk to life and limb.

After all, how would science have progressed if people were sissies and feared any force they didn't understand?
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Re: Build a small electric shock device

Postby PM 2Ring » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:28 am UTC

I think some people in this thread need a new sarcasm detector:

Image

I made a "joy buzzer" when I was a kid from an electromechanical buzzer & an audio matching transformer. It ran off a 1.5v AA cell. I expect such buzzers have been completely superceded by piezo devices. I suppose the circuit could be built using an electromechanical relay, but a simple digital circuit would be more compact.
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