Page 1 of 2

Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:08 am UTC
by setzer777
Confession: I'm 27 and I still play with action figures. I also collect what I call "knick-knacks" and use my imagination to play with them (toothpicks and big paperclips = swords, small paperclips = guns, either kind can = spaceships, etc.)

Why is there such a strong cultural push against adults playing with toys? Even I, who consider myself relatively unconcerned with cultural norms, am only admitting this in an anonymous forum under the influence of alcohol.

Edit: I'm afraid uneditable title typos are one of the hazards of posting while drunk....

Edit 2: Oh, I guess I can edit them, just won't change the title in initial replies.

Re: Playing With Toys as and Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:23 am UTC
by Deva
Theory: Associates toys with childhood. Connects that to immaturity. Bundles maturity with responsibility, intelligence, and possibly other traits.

Recalls this too:
When I was a child, I spake as a child,
I understood as a child, I thought as a child:
but when I became a man, I put away
childish things.

Re: Playing With Toys as and Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:29 am UTC
by WibblyWobbly
Deva wrote:Theory: Associates toys with childhood. Connects that to immaturity. Bundles maturity with responsibility, intelligence, and possibly other traits.

Recalls this too:
When I was a child, I spake as a child,
I understood as a child, I thought as a child:
but when I became a man, I put away
childish things.


To which I reply with one of my all-time favorite quotes:

“When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” - C.S. Lewis

The only good thing about adulthood is that once you take care of things like food, shelter, supporting a family, etc., you get to decide how grown up you really need to be. If you're taking care of the things that need to be done, who the fuck has the right to tell you that you shouldn't play with toys?

Re: Playing With Toys as and Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 2:30 am UTC
by setzer777
Deva wrote:Theory: Associates toys with childhood. Connects that to immaturity. Bundles maturity with responsibility, intelligence, and possibly other traits.

Recalls this too:
When I was a child, I spake as a child,
I understood as a child, I thought as a child:
but when I became a man, I put away
childish things.


Interesting. I wonder why that association is made? Even most adults realize the importance of imagination - see "mind maps" and similar. And it's even acceptable for an adult to have fantasy situations involving themselves: sexual fantasies, power fantasies; even revenge fantasies are considered psychologically normal. But something about imagining worlds apart from yourself is considerd immature, unless you're writing.

Maybe writing is the key - perhaps with adulthood comes an expectation of a move towards more abstract verbal thinking, instead of visual or kinesthetic?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 3:19 am UTC
by Brace
Movies and plays are still acceptable, even those that are completely lacking in didactic function. I think children's play is a sort of way of reinforcing learned narratives, values, and behaviors, as the child learns them. Once you become old you're expected to not need that anymore, and so if you still do these sorts of activities, you have to do them in the form of art, which has a different function.

Re: Playing With Toys as and Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 3:45 am UTC
by Deva
setzer777 wrote:Interesting. I wonder why that association is made? Even most adults realize the importance of imagination - see "mind maps" and similar. And it's even acceptable for an adult to have fantasy situations involving themselves: sexual fantasies, power fantasies; even revenge fantasies are considered psychologically normal. But something about imagining worlds apart from yourself is considerd immature, unless you're writing.

Maybe writing is the key - perhaps with adulthood comes an expectation of a move towards more abstract verbal thinking, instead of visual or kinesthetic?

Suspects a degree of egoism. Replaces "something childish" with "something adult". Ask six year olds if they watch Sesame Street. Views that as babyish, most likely. Distances themselves. Tries to emulate older kids who do not watch Sesame Street. (Probably watches something else "childish", by "adult" standards.)

Relates to simplicity too, possibly. Loses enjoyment in cube blocks with letters. Plays with Duplo next. Graduates to normal Legos. Provides more room for imagination. Relies more on translating imagination to reality as well.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 4:53 am UTC
by Djehutynakht
I think it also gives people a sense of self-worth sometimes. "Oh, he still does <childish thing> but I have moved up to <superior adult thing> because I am so sophisticated and advanced"

We have some comics for this.

http://xkcd.com/150/

http://xkcd.com/219/

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 11:30 am UTC
by elminster
Off topic: I totally thought I was in the "Love, Sex, and Relationships" subforum for a minute there, which made it kinda weird as to where it was going.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:43 pm UTC
by philsov
Playing with toys falls into the same pile as daydreaming.

Imo it is the lowest form of imagination; there's zero creation or communication involved with the act.

Drawing, painting, writing, crafting, dancing, musical creation, etc... all these things can be shared. Consumption of others creation at least has a social/communal aspect to it, as does playing with toys/make believe if done with children or other adults.

Painted with a broad stroke, one remove themselves from both society and reality via these acts. It's... immature/childish/selfish to do so.

(Also fwiw its a skill that I've lost with age... probably early high school. So there's some association with that aspect, too)

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:47 pm UTC
by WibblyWobbly
philsov wrote:Playing with toys falls into the same pile as daydreaming.

Imo it is the lowest form of imagination; there's zero creation or communication involved with the act.

Drawing, painting, writing, crafting, dancing, musical creation, etc... all these things can be shared. Consumption of others creation at least has a social/communal aspect to it, as does playing with toys/make believe if done with children or other adults.

Painted with a broad stroke, one remove themselves from both society and reality via these acts. It's... immature/childish/selfish to do so.

(Also fwiw its a skill that I've lost with age... probably early high school. So there's some association with that aspect, too)

Bollocks.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:55 pm UTC
by setzer777
Hm, by that metric wouldn't doing any of those things in private with no intention to ever produce/perform for other people be just as bad?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:16 pm UTC
by philsov
setzer777 wrote:Hm, by that metric wouldn't doing any of those things in private with no intention to ever produce/perform for other people be just as bad?


Still bad, but not -as- bad imo. Those things at least leave the door open, or if nothing else serve as a progress log to show yourself how much you've improved and cultivated your skills, which is a boon it itself. There's no means to show cultivation of daydreaming.

Not to say having an imagination in general is bad in any way, but to evoke it in such a manner is the rough equivalent of watching daytime television.

And I really can't speak for society in general, but its partially the reason why I view adults playing with toys by themselves so lowly. Its mostly an internal thing;I'd like to think I treat them as I would anyone neutral.

@wibbly - its okay. Denial is often the first step.

Spoiler:
if you want to refute my argument you're welcome to, but this sort of response is all im willing to afford someone who posts in such a manner.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:25 pm UTC
by setzer777
philsov wrote:
setzer777 wrote:Hm, by that metric wouldn't doing any of those things in private with no intention to ever produce/perform for other people be just as bad?


Still bad, but not -as- bad imo. Those things at least leave the door open, or if nothing else serve as a progress log to show yourself how much you've improved and cultivated your skills, which is a boon it itself. There's no means to show cultivation of daydreaming.


I don't understand the importance you're placing on that. If the skills are only ever used for your own personal entertainment, why does it matter if you can objectively log your improvement in them? If I invent my own game of solitaire, and then track my improvement at that game, is that somehow better than dreaming up stories and (from my subjective point of view) improving my abilities of characterization, plotting, and world-building?

It seems to me that (assuming all of this takes place in solitude), the only meaningful difference is that progress logs more easily trigger the reward center of the brain and make us feel like we're accomplishing something, even if the benefit is exactly the same (personal entertainment).

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:26 pm UTC
by SecondTalon
Counter-Query

What's the difference between someone who plays with action figures, enacting various scenes within the span of their imagination and someone who writes snippets of a play or movie or television show, or skits even, with no intention of them ever being finalized or performed by actors?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:30 pm UTC
by Izawwlgood
SecondTalon wrote:Counter-Query

What's the difference between someone who plays with action figures, enacting various scenes within the span of their imagination and someone who writes snippets of a play or movie or television show, or skits even, with no intention of them ever being finalized or performed by actors?
I think it depends on the age level of what's being written. E.g., a 30 year old writing Sponge Bob Fan Fic may be viewed as odd. Similarly, action figures aren't generally aimed at age levels >10.

That's obviously debatable, given how many adults went to Avengers, but still.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:32 pm UTC
by Angua
Not really seeing the problem with day dreaming or playing by yourself (what about just playing single person online games, or solitaire).


Also, I've been meaning to post this in this thread: Little Wars: How HG Wells invented hobby war gaming

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:35 pm UTC
by setzer777
Angua wrote:Not really seeing the problem with day dreaming or playing by yourself (what about just playing single person online games, or solitaire).


Also, I've been meaning to post this in this thread: Little Wars: How HG Wells invented hobby war gaming


I may be wrong, but I think that by Philsov's metric playing games designed by other people is better because it is still engaging with the external world (a form of communication between creator and player) in a way that daydreaming or playing a game of your own making wouldn't be.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:38 pm UTC
by WibblyWobbly
philsov wrote:@wibbly - its okay. Denial is often the first step.

Spoiler:
if you want to refute my argument you're welcome to, but this sort of response is all im willing to afford someone who posts in such a manner.

Sorry; should have clarified, but "bollocks" was literally the first thought that came to mind.

philsov wrote:Playing with toys falls into the same pile as daydreaming.

Imo it is the lowest form of imagination; there's zero creation or communication involved with the act.

Drawing, painting, writing, crafting, dancing, musical creation, etc... all these things can be shared. Consumption of others creation at least has a social/communal aspect to it, as does playing with toys/make believe if done with children or other adults.

Painted with a broad stroke, one remove themselves from both society and reality via these acts. It's... immature/childish/selfish to do so.

(Also fwiw its a skill that I've lost with age... probably early high school. So there's some association with that aspect, too)


If I read you correctly, playing with toys, specifically action figures, is a low form of imagination because by its nature it lacks a social component; that the "childishness" derives from isolating oneself to have fun without adding anything to others. I disagree completely. If I had action figures (and I don't, but that's not because I wouldn't enjoy playing with them), I'd suggest setzer777 and I could set up an action-figure war game right now. There's nothing inherently singular about playing with action figures unless you demand that it be so; in that case, I wouldn't equate isolation with childishness, but with a lack of sociability present in any number of so-called "adults". In fact, wouldn't playing with action figures in a social setting be rather similar to miniature wargames like Warhammer 40k? Only, with Warhammer, haven't we actually removed some of the imagination by instituting some form of rule-based combat? (Not knocking Warhammer, just suggesting that the imposition of rules slightly diminishes the overall imagination). Or would you look at Warhammer players as being childish as well?

Edit: I also have a slight problem with the idea that consumption of others' work is somehow less "immature", as the communication or creation in that regard all seems single-sided. The creator gives to you, and you simply consume. There's no real connection; the creator may have no contact whatsoever with the consumer, and unless the consumer shares the experience of that consumption with others, any gain is similarly isolated much as playing with action figures by oneself, except that if I play with action figures, I have to create their story. But unless we're sitting in a theater in the round and the playwright is interacting with the audience as the play commences, the social connection is still lost, IMO.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:41 pm UTC
by Angua
That was supposed to be a separate train of thought from the reply about Philsov. Just the idea that you have one grown man in a room playing with all of his toys.

Of course, he was then creative and made something from that, so I guess he eventually fulfilled Philsov's criteria for something useful to society. One would argue that before a lot of creative things happen, someone daydreams about them first though.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:47 pm UTC
by setzer777
Angua wrote:That was supposed to be a separate train of thought from the reply about Philsov. Just the idea that you have one grown man in a room playing with all of his toys.

Of course, he was then creative and made something from that, so I guess he eventually fulfilled Philsov's criteria for something useful to society. One would argue that before a lot of creative things happen, someone daydreams about them first though.


Oh, yeah, my reply was to your first sentence, I just quoted your whole post.

Thanks for posting the link! I'm reading through Wells' description of developing the game, and it's really interesting. I'm fascinated by game design in general, and a lot of my daydreaming and play involves coming up with game systems to go along with the narrative I'm inventing.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:52 pm UTC
by SecondTalon
Izawwlgood wrote:
SexyTalon wrote:Counter-Query

What's the difference between someone who plays with action figures, enacting various scenes within the span of their imagination and someone who writes snippets of a play or movie or television show, or skits even, with no intention of them ever being finalized or performed by actors?
I think it depends on the age level of what's being written. E.g., a 30 year old writing Sponge Bob Fan Fic may be viewed as odd. Similarly, action figures aren't generally aimed at age levels >10.

That's obviously debatable, given how many adults went to Avengers, but still.
That's kinda my point - if we're saying that writing or painting or photography or sculpture or other forms of creative output are - in and of themselves and before we discuss subject matter - developed ways of providing a creative outlet, and that playing with toys is - in and of itself before we discuss the scenarios being played out - an undeveloped way of providing a creative outlet...

Where do these things differ? Using Lego Figures to enact a romantic play of two middle-aged individuals with radically different backgrounds and work histories who nevertheless are finding an emotional connection after a chance meeting in a cafe (only with Wookies and Robots and Pirates as background characters because why the fuck not?) for yourself and yourself alone is always low, while painting anuses is always - at least relative to the Lego play - high?

I find that difficult to believe.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:54 pm UTC
by Angua
What if I draw a cartoon of a painting of a comic strip?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:55 pm UTC
by WibblyWobbly
Angua wrote:What if I draw a cartoon of a painting of a comic strip?

You need to go deeper. Direct a video in which an actor draws a cartoon of a painting of a comic strip depicting the stage production of bad Spongebob fanfic.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:57 pm UTC
by setzer777
SecondTalon wrote:Where do these things differ? Using Lego Figures to enact a romantic play of two middle-aged individuals with radically different backgrounds and work histories who nevertheless are finding an emotional connection after a chance meeting in a cafe (only with Wookies and Robots and Pirates as background characters because why the fuck not?) for yourself and yourself alone is always low, while painting anuses is always - at least relative to the Lego play - high?

I find that difficult to believe.


Ha, that description almost makes me want to buy a bunch of Legos and set up a three act play.

WibblyWobbly wrote:
Angua wrote:What if I draw a cartoon of a painting of a comic strip?

You need to go deeper. Direct a video in which an actor draws a cartoon of a painting of a comic strip depicting the stage production of bad Spongebob fanfic.


That's some House of Leaves shit right there...

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:59 pm UTC
by Xeio
philsov wrote:Playing with toys falls into the same pile as daydreaming.

Imo it is the lowest form of imagination; there's zero creation or communication involved with the act.

Drawing, painting, writing, crafting, dancing, musical creation, etc... all these things can be shared. Consumption of others creation at least has a social/communal aspect to it, as does playing with toys/make believe if done with children or other adults.

Painted with a broad stroke, one remove themselves from both society and reality via these acts. It's... immature/childish/selfish to do so.

(Also fwiw its a skill that I've lost with age... probably early high school. So there's some association with that aspect, too)
Uh, so reading books, watching TV/movies, playing video games... all fall into this "zero creation or communication" category.

I'll continue having fun, you can continue being a party pooper. :P

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:15 pm UTC
by JudeMorrigan
Angua wrote:What if I draw a cartoon of a painting of a comic strip?

Sophomoric. Intellectually sterile. ...“Low” art.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:16 pm UTC
by setzer777
Calvin and Hobbes reference?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:40 pm UTC
by bluebambue
Maybe it has something to do with the fact that most stories I've heard of played out with toys are very simple with lots of inconsistent logic. So when I hear of adults playing with toys, I assume those same simple ideas. If all I knew about someone is that they often engaged in simple imaginations, I would think negatively because then they aren't practicing the level of thinking that I require to enjoy interacting with them at any meaningful level.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:50 pm UTC
by setzer777
bluebambue wrote:Maybe it has something to do with the fact that most stories I've heard of played out with toys are very simple with lots of inconsistent logic. So when I hear of adults playing with toys, I assume those same simple ideas. If all I knew about someone is that they often engaged in simple imaginations, I would think negatively because then they aren't practicing the level of thinking that I require to enjoy interacting with them at any meaningful level.


That's a good point. Of course it ends up being kind of circular - simple stories are enacted because it's primarily children playing with toys. At least, I'm assuming that other adults who enact stories with toys improve the quality of their stories as their brains develop.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:10 pm UTC
by JudeMorrigan
setzer777 wrote:Calvin and Hobbes reference?

Of course! I assume Angua would have been disappointed had noone gotten it.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:14 pm UTC
by setzer777
JudeMorrigan wrote:
setzer777 wrote:Calvin and Hobbes reference?

Of course! I assume Angua would have been disappointed had noone gotten it.


Yeah, I have to confess that I didn't get it until your reply.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:17 pm UTC
by WibblyWobbly
bluebambue wrote:Maybe it has something to do with the fact that most stories I've heard of played out with toys are very simple with lots of inconsistent logic. So when I hear of adults playing with toys, I assume those same simple ideas. If all I knew about someone is that they often engaged in simple imaginations, I would think negatively because then they aren't practicing the level of thinking that I require to enjoy interacting with them at any meaningful level.

I'm not 100% sure this has anything to do with what you're saying, but I remember that when I was a kid, a lot of other kids would have battles with action figures where one would say something like "My <insert guy here> just shot your <insert guy here> with his triple laser rifle! I win!" to which the reply would be something like "Nuh-uh, my <guy> dodged with his solar jetpack! Then he blasted <your guy> with fifty missiles and blew him up!" "Nuh-uh, then my <guy> called on his DRAGON T-REX, who breathes fire and stomps on your <guy>'s solar jetpack!" "Nuh-uh ..." and this would go on for a long, long time. I hated that. Nowadays, I still dislike that sort of inconsistent story or inconsistent logic, but I wish I still had it, in a way. Sure, the stories adults make up can be just as fanciful in many ways, but they still require that consistency that we've come to expect - naturally, I'd assume, as it mirrors the consistent narrative of everyday life to which we are accustomed. Inconsistency just doesn't fit, and sometimes I feel like that requirement - that they "[practice] the level of thinking that I require to enjoy interacting with them at any meaningful level" - seems very restrictive at times. Childish inconsistency doesn't seem as bogged down by restriction as adult thinking tends to become. Maybe that's another narrative trope talking - if you want really creative solutions, find a genius kid! But to a certain extent, I kind of miss the times when those simple stories and inconsistent logic were all I needed to have fun.

Long story short, yeah, I still play with toys similar to the ones I grew up with, and I see nothing wrong with that. The difference is that I don't play with them exactly as I did when I was a child.

And I missed the C&H reference, and that makes me sad.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:23 pm UTC
by Plasma Man
If someone disapproves of me for playing with building blocks or toy swords or action figures, that's their problem. I'm having fun. Also, I don't know what the situation is in other countries, but in the UK, building model kits (e.g. Airfix) is traditionally seen as an adult activity - so why not put together a Warhammer model and game with it?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 11:08 pm UTC
by Xeio
So, is toys in this context really just pokemon?

Like only things someone thinks are "childish" are toys? Like if you want to condescendingly dismiss someone playing tabletop D&D or WH40K by telling them they should stop playing with toys?

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 1:13 am UTC
by Nylonathatep
When I was in High school, I saw beside a typical 'Trouble maker'. One day he got bored and pulled out his Batman and Joker Figurine and began a narrative where Joker explained his fascination of Batman as being attracted to him; Batman recuperates his feelings to Joker and then my classmate had Batman and Joker making out with each other.

So the morals of this story? Playing with Toys actually exercises one's imagination/creative muscles and can explore scenarios... and we are never too old to use our own imagination :)

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:33 am UTC
by addams
Play is an important part of being human.
In the Natural World humans would be in the company of humans of a variety of ages.

It is fun to play. I did not play with toys, much. Not as a child.
As an Adult. Whew Hew! Fun! Toys!

It is nice to have someone to play with.
Jet Skis are a toy. Any kind of Ski is a toy.
Buzz Lightyear is a toy. He was a fun guy.

The generals and Kings played with little war toys.
Then they got bigger toys and went off to kill, the grown up way.

It is ok with me if people play with toys. I would like to play.
It is a Wonderful way to find out about the internal life of the person.

How does this person talk to the toys?
How does this person talk to equipment?
How does this person talk to other people?
A connection? Yes. I think so.

Toys are great for adults.
An adult may speak frankly to a toy.

You can imagine it is a person you may not Speak Up to.
Your boss or your bosses boss. That is not really play.
That is an important kind of work.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 6:46 am UTC
by Angua
WibblyWobbly wrote:
And I missed the C&H reference, and that makes me sad.

Though the fact that you missed the reference and extended the concept into something crazier anyway was awesome.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 9:04 am UTC
by Alder
SecondTalon wrote:That's kinda my point - if we're saying that writing or painting or photography or sculpture or other forms of creative output are - in and of themselves and before we discuss subject matter - developed ways of providing a creative outlet, and that playing with toys is - in and of itself before we discuss the scenarios being played out - an undeveloped way of providing a creative outlet...

Where do these things differ? Using Lego Figures to enact a romantic play of two middle-aged individuals with radically different backgrounds and work histories who nevertheless are finding an emotional connection after a chance meeting in a cafe (only with Wookies and Robots and Pirates as background characters because why the fuck not?) for yourself and yourself alone is always low, while painting anuses is always - at least relative to the Lego play - high?

I find that difficult to believe.

This reminds me that there's an old post of yours somewhere defining being an adult as something like "buying Lego at 3 in the morning and no-one can stop you".

One of these days I'm going to do it, and then I'll know I'm *really* grown-up.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 1:46 pm UTC
by bdew
Why do you (plural) even make a connection between adulthood and creativity?

Children can easily be more creative than adults (just look at your average fanfic site, i'm pretty sure more than half the writers are underage).

On the other hands adults do non-creative stuff everyday as a form of relaxation after work/university/whatever, and i don't think daydreaming or playing with toys is any less valid form of relaxation than watching tv or getting drunk.

Re: Playing With Toys as an Adult

Posted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 2:03 pm UTC
by pkcommando
LEGOs + alcohol = Awesomeness. Doubly so the next day when you survey your star-houseboatcopter-ship.



When it comes to toys I just think of my favorite Doctor Who quote: "There's no point in being grown-up if you can't be childish sometimes."