Childhood misconceptions

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Zak
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Zak » Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:01 am UTC

I never did understand why we had to learn cursive, hardly anyone uses it.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Ishindri » Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:09 am UTC

*raises hand*

Ever since I learned cursive in third grade, it's all I've used. It's just so much faster.

You're right about hardly anybody using it, though. We had an impromptu poll in my Latin class yesterday, and out of more than thirty kids, I was the only one who wrote in cursive. (Regularly.)
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby benjhuey » Sun Mar 30, 2008 6:36 am UTC

I would write cursive for speed, but I've almost lot it completely, so speed isn't going to happen any time soon. Plus, my writing is relatively small and organized, so speedy cursive would throw me off.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Sun Mar 30, 2008 1:54 pm UTC

Rippy wrote:Yeah, in elementary school I thought that cursive was the only kind of writing anyone would use after the 3rd grade (or whatever grade it was), since the teachers were always so strict about forcing us to use nothing but cursive. To my surprise, by grade 6 none of the teachers cared.

So now I use plain writing for prettyness and cursive for speed. Which usually means, regular writing for the titles, and cursive for paragraphs.


I had a similar misconception that all adults were required to write in cursive, and children were only allowed to write in print. Also, that only adults could read in cursive and children only print. That was, until we learned cursive writing in third grade as well.

I don't write in cursive at all, since my cursive writing looks like crap. I've always found print to be easier. Some things I might write in cursive, if it's something I don't want many people to be able to read, or if I'm signing things like my checks or time sheets.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Torvaun » Mon Mar 31, 2008 5:03 am UTC

Only my signature is done in cursive.

For bonus points, when I got to the point when I was going to start actually using my signature, I didn't remember exactly how I'd been taught the cursive capital 'D', so I borrowed the one from Disney. Still use that D to this day.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby shinybaby » Mon Mar 31, 2008 11:43 pm UTC

i'm mildly dyslexic, so i can't write in cursive. i tend to spell words correctly, but i don't write the letters in the right order initially. (ie: the word correct will mostly get written -o-r-r- -c- then the c, e, and t would get added - in the right spots - after the rest of the letters), which is next to impossible in cursive and ends up making me look like an idiot!

half cursive, half print is what i end up using (often within words, not even just between them!) it's quick and allows my brain to write words the way it sees them without anyone else being the wiser! ;)
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Babam » Tue Apr 01, 2008 3:45 am UTC

When I was I used to read alot of books that had the true name concept in them, so I always used a fake name, but my mom would correct them. I still rue her for that.

Also when I was way younger I was appallad that every one but me could tie shoes, but I was the only who could read in kindergarten.
I didnt learn to do so till 3rd/4th grade, and didnt learn to ride a bike untill our 6th grade bike trip. (damnit I had a comma splice, sadface.)
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby IronyandParadox » Wed Apr 02, 2008 3:54 am UTC

Until about...hmm...a month ago, I was convinced that Christopher Robin from Winnie the Pooh was a girl.
In my head, somehow, it made sense. I mean, the only actual girl in the Pooh stories is Kanga, so obviously I had to be missing something, because there HAD to be more than one girl. Plus, Christopher Robin had a kinda bob for a haircut. I think I must have just been thinking of "Robin" and dropping the "Christopher" part of his name, which made his name distinctly feminine.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Arsin » Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:43 am UTC

I thought that I would never be an adult. It wasn't that I just didn't understand growing up -- I knew, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that I would die before I turned eighteen. Luckily, I was wrong.

I thought that to program a game, you drew a separate image (from scratch) for every single conceivable screen output as a whole, then connected them. Like a game was just a network of millions of individually-drawn screenshots turned into a massive real time choose-your-own-adventure thing.

I thought that sex was gross. Who would ever want to do that?

I thought that if I prayed hard enough, God would give me what I wanted. Anything I wanted, immediately.

I thought that girls had tiny, tiny penises. I also thought that a woman got pregnant as a direct result of marriage, and that the baby came out of her belly button.

I thought that it was wrong to play Diablo on Sundays.

I thought that if you left the faucet on, it would drain an entire lake in under an hour.

I thought the inside of the human body was completely solid, like just a whole big block of flesh.

I thought that thoughts came from the brain, and feelings from the heart.

I thought that Santa Claus got into our trailer by flattening out paper-thin and sliding under the door. This scared the hell out of me for years. I would always sleep dutifully every Christmas Eve out of fear of seeing him.

I thought that if I peed under the bed, no one would ever know.

Once I found out what a vagina was, it still took me years to figure out that it wasn't literally a long, open slot. In retrospect, that was *really weird.* I also thought it was somehow connected to the body by webbing, like the kind that frog toes have.
Spoiler:
I think this was because of a How To Draw Manga book. It had a whole four pages on the female crotch, but no actual vaginas shown, and it looked pretty strange.


I thought that everyone Spider-Man beat up died.

I thought that God wouldn't let Santa give presents to non-Christian kids.

I thought that the fuzz on fuzzy furniture was actually real hair. I remember calling the fuzz on library furniture "library hair." I would pull off as much of it as I could, put it in my pocket, and add it to the lint drawer in my room.

*EDIT* Thought of more.

I thought that if you drug a desktop icon over another, your hard drive would be wiped.

I thought that turning the computer off using the Off button on the tower, or using the Reset button, would eventually damage and destroy your computer.

I thought that before a person was born they were tiny cherub babies floating around searching for a fetus to possess.

I thought that if you ran fast enough, you could teleport. (I blame Earthbound for this, and the injuries my friends and I sustained in the name of science)

I thought tree-sap was tree-blood pumping through them at the same speed as it did a human body. Actually, to this day if I damage a tree and see it "bleed," it makes me want to cry.

I thought that if I accidentally envisioned someone's head falling off too vividly, it could really happen.

I thought that at any moment, if I wasn't vigilant enough, Satan could take over my body and make me commit crimes.

I thought that New Jersey was a city, and that Texas was a gigantic desert.

I thought you could taste color, and that if I tried hard enough, different-colored M&Ms would taste differently.

I thought that when you sent e-mail to the wrong address, the "Mailer_Daemon" or whatever that responded was a real person. One, single person, personally returning every failed e-mail and hand-typing the notifications.
Last edited by Arsin on Thu Apr 03, 2008 5:22 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby benjhuey » Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:50 am UTC

I thought, because I had seen my mom do it to mark pages, that if I folded over the corners of a page of a toy magazine that had something I wanted on it, I would get it.

Arsin wrote:I thought that to program a game, you drew a separate image (from scratch) for every single conceivable screen output as a whole, then connected them. Like a game was just a network of millions of individually-drawn screenshots turned into a massive real time choose-your-own-adventure thing.

I had formulated something similar to this in my head when I couldn't figure out how they did it. Made sense, if not being a complicated mess.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby itseemsso » Thu Apr 03, 2008 5:15 am UTC

well, to be honest i don't have a memory of not knowing what sex was. I don;t remember anyone ever telling me. I've known since i was three or so, but it always confused me. I knew exactly how it worked but i never understood how the person on top didn't crush the other person. I thought it would kill them to have someone put all their weight on them, made no sense whatsoever. Then i drew the conclusion that people must not weigh as much when they're having sex, like magically the weight doesn't count or something, I'm not quite sure.
Another amazing memory. Someone wrote that they were upset when they realized they would never be older than their brother since they both got older every year. WELL, when I was in kindergarden my teacher's daughter, who was in high school, would come visit the classroom sometimes. My friend Dylan was in love with her, and one day he got down on one knee and proposed to our teachers 17 year old daughter. "One day" Dylan said. "When we're both 20, I'm gonna marry you" and he kissed her hand. =] Kindergarden was fun.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Vanguard » Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:41 pm UTC

Z.A.K wrote:I never did understand why we had to learn cursive, hardly anyone uses it.


Hrm, my middle schools tried using the fear-mongering method of saying "High school requires pens and cursive!" The "Never make writing mistakes" thing scared the jesus out of me.
Now that I'm older. Math classes require Pencils completely, some teachers WANT you to revise shit, and especially in English Class where scratching things out and adding stuff is actually looked well upon.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby nsmjohn » Thu Apr 03, 2008 5:00 pm UTC

Vanguard wrote:
Z.A.K wrote:I never did understand why we had to learn cursive, hardly anyone uses it.


Hrm, my middle schools tried using the fear-mongering method of saying "High school requires pens and cursive!" The "Never make writing mistakes" thing scared the jesus out of me.
Now that I'm older. Math classes require Pencils completely, some teachers WANT you to revise shit, and especially in English Class where scratching things out and adding stuff is actually looked well upon.


One of my elemtary school teachers forced us to use cursive for like a year. Consequently I used cursive since then through most of highschool and now my print looks like shit. I have had teacher tell me that I am not allowed to handwrite anything, even if the other students could.

Misconception: I thought being a grownup would be cool and being a kid sucked.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Day Tripper » Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:21 am UTC

I thought the well-known pregnancy book, "What To Expect When You're Expecting", was some sort of self-help or psychology book. As in, what the repercussions will be if you have the attitude of always "expecting" things to come to you in life. I must've been around 6 or 7.

And about the whole "cursive" issue, my teachers must've been crap, because I write in a weird blend of cursive and printing. Even the same letter, for example the letter "a", sometimes I'll write it like this "a", and sometimes like an "o" with a tail. And "s" is sometimes written the regular way, and sometimes written the cursive way, like a backwards ampersand. But I guess that's not really a misconception.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Sour Apple » Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:58 am UTC

benjhuey wrote:I thought, because I had seen my mom do it to mark pages, that if I folded over the corners of a page of a toy magazine that had something I wanted on it, I would get it.


Haha. That reminds me, when I was little I had the misconception that my parents were stupid enough to not recognize my handwriting on the grocery list and that they would be fooled into buying what I wanted. So one notable time I scrawled "donut" on the list and spent most of the grocery trip saying "hey, look, Dad, I think Mom wrote... um... I think it says doughnut. Apparently she wants to get me a doughnut."
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby oxoiron » Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:10 pm UTC

That one made me smile.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby timt » Fri Apr 04, 2008 4:48 pm UTC

Weird, almost everyone here writes in cursive. It seems perfectly normal to me.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Ian Ex Machina » Fri Apr 04, 2008 6:54 pm UTC

I can trace my next CM from my incomplete knowlege of genetics, and the game SimLife.

I got the game in year 3 (7-8 years old?) and was forever wondering why, with all the science we had we couldn't just mix the genes of different creatures and the creatures would look like parts of either.

This was soon rectified by my parents, and NewScientist magazine.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby mike » Sat Apr 05, 2008 11:23 am UTC

I was told by the 'rents from a young age (5-6) Elvis Presely died because he was to fat.

I never questioned it until the inevitable day that someone asked me how he died, I must have been 14-15. I said it out loud and I looked really stupid for a bit, then I realised what I had said.

Bloody radio rentals!

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby nyeguy » Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:51 pm UTC

Day Tripper wrote:And about the whole "cursive" issue, my teachers must've been crap, because I write in a weird blend of cursive and printing. Even the same letter, for example the letter "a", sometimes I'll write it like this "a", and sometimes like an "o" with a tail. And "s" is sometimes written the regular way, and sometimes written the cursive way, like a backwards ampersand. But I guess that's not really a misconception.

People write "a" other ways than an "o" with a tail? I thought it was only ever typed like that.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Unforgiven » Sun Apr 06, 2008 6:50 am UTC

If I write cursive it looks like a seismograph, even I can't read it back half of the time. Lots of people thought I would become a doctor because of my terrible handwriting. :P

Misconceptions of my own... I can't really remember any. I know I read Disney as Disnep as mentioned on the first pages of this thread, but I knew it was Disney, it just looked like Disnep.

I think there were a few revolving around made-up words. I used to call Quaker Cruesli serial "krak" (Dutch; loosely translates as "crunch") and I'm fairly certain I thought it was actually called that for a time. The same goes for thinking dry cat food was called "knabbelknikkers" ("snack marbles", roughly) because that's what my parents called it.

I guess every household has some made-up words like that.

But I was never very gullible. I never fell for all the usual pranks they try to play on new kids at seascouts (e.g. having them bail out the water from the sword housing, which is impossible since it's open at the bottom which I immediately realised; I know quite a few kids who fell for that and spend hours on this task before realising that they were making zero progress :) ).
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby GCM » Sun Apr 06, 2008 9:44 am UTC

I've got a boxload of those, though I can't exactly recall them verbatim. Some were funny.

When I was real young (not sure, about 4 or 5 or 6), my mom told me that one mile is 1.6 kilometers, and I was wondering what this "decimal point" was. She kept trying to explain it to me, but stupid me accepted the idea (because of the "6") that she meant one mile=six kilometers, and I used this to judge some distances. You can imagine what happens.

Also, I used to live with my grandparents at their home a while away (200 kilometers, about [or, 33.33 miles! Woo!]), and my parents visited every now and then.(or maybe not. My memorys not so good. And my dad was in law school in the UK sometime then, so I can't tell). At the back areas (relatively big house, compared to mine. With a garden, and a field just outside it), there was a storeroom where someone (can't remember who, again) told me there was a snake (whether they said dead or alive or neither, yup, can't remember.) up in those high places, caught and wrapped up in plastic. I wasn't afraid, honest, but it really looked like a snake. Of course, maybe that was just me. It went away eventually, and to this day I'm still not sure.

Also, me and my cousin (who lived with my grandparents and his dad, and some others) used to play with BB Guns, and I actually though they were real guns, and was like "Wow, soldiers must be really weak to die so easily"

I was a pretty messed up kid, granted.

Oh yeah, I was also scared to use pens. Not to mention my handwriting was horrible.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Bosonator » Sun Apr 06, 2008 1:03 pm UTC

I successfully misspelled the word "February" as "Febuary" (like it sounds) until first year undergrad without anyone ever noticing or correcting me. The only reason I realized I was spelling it wrong was that MS Word kept red-underlining it. Even then, I had to check it out in a couple places to convince myself there actually was that "r" there.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby wing » Sun Apr 06, 2008 8:46 pm UTC

Bosonator wrote:I successfully misspelled the word "February" as "Febuary" (like it sounds) until first year undergrad without anyone ever noticing or correcting me. The only reason I realized I was spelling it wrong was that MS Word kept red-underlining it. Even then, I had to check it out in a couple places to convince myself there actually was that "r" there.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby koneko » Sun Apr 06, 2008 11:35 pm UTC

GCM wrote:Oh yeah, I was also scared to use pens. Not to mention my handwriting was horrible.

I imagine the two were related somewhat?
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Babam » Mon Apr 07, 2008 1:53 am UTC

For ages I thought that Egypt still had Pharaohs and Magic, I blame TV.

I also thought that when my voice was high pitched on tape, that it was my father editing it in real time to freak me out.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Upsilon » Mon Apr 07, 2008 2:02 am UTC

I used to believe that there were monsters underneath my bed, and that if I covered myself up with my blanket, they would not be able to see, hear, or harm me.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Babam » Mon Apr 07, 2008 2:05 am UTC

Upsilon wrote:I used to believe that there were monsters underneath my bed, and that if I covered myself up with my blanket, they would not be able to see, hear, or harm me.

Yup same here, I also believed I could fall asleep bye squeezing my eye shut really hard for long periods of time. I was a very tired child.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Rippy » Mon Apr 07, 2008 2:20 am UTC

Upsilon wrote:I used to believe that there were monsters underneath my bed, and that if I covered myself up with my blanket, they would not be able to see, hear, or harm me.

I was afraid of ghosts getting at me as I slept. I knew it was irrational, it was a kind of mental struggle between me being afraid of ghosts behind me, and me knowing they weren't there. I ended up defeating it by conjuring up an impenetrable barrier around me. Then the ghosts just bumped off of it and I was fine.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby koneko » Mon Apr 07, 2008 2:48 am UTC

My night fears were flaming skeletons who caused saggy boobs. Quite scary, that.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby mrorange » Tue Apr 08, 2008 3:19 am UTC

spoilerd because i may have posted this before but it was related to the current subtopic of childhood dream fears.

Spoiler:
when i was maybe five i thought there was a skeleton with a scythe who would come and attack me if i peed in the water in the toilet at night because it would wake him up because it was too loud, which resulted in me trying to aim for the wall of the bowl above the water and consequently missing a lot. my mother just thought she was failing at potty training me or something. anyway, this fear was assuaged in the strangest way, in a dream, i was going pee and i accidentally peed in the water and the skeleton SHOWED UP but proceeded to tell me he was just there to use the bathroom too (dont ask how) and that the peeing in the water didnt bother him. so basically my subconscious solved the issue itself... i was a strange little kid.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby GCM » Tue Apr 08, 2008 3:46 am UTC

koneko wrote:
GCM wrote:Oh yeah, I was also scared to use pens. Not to mention my handwriting was horrible.

I imagine the two were related somewhat?


Maybe. I think it was mainly because I was just nervous about making mistakes while writing, something that I grew out of. It was a bit confusing; some of my teachers wanted mistakes blanked out, some wanted them completely scribbled over, some wanted a clean straight line crossing them out, and the rest wanted no mistakes. At all. One even shredded this kids homework because he crossed out something, yelling "Rewrite it if you make a mistake!", though that's a rare/extreme case.

My handwriting's much better now, though :D. Still a bit inconsistent, but only a little.

Rippy wrote:I was afraid of ghosts getting at me as I slept. I knew it was irrational, it was a kind of mental struggle between me being afraid of ghosts behind me, and me knowing they weren't there. I ended up defeating it by conjuring up an impenetrable barrier around me. Then the ghosts just bumped off of it and I was fine.


I'm afraid of ghosts now.

Not regular ghosts, mind you. Danny Phantom, Ghostbusters, etc. are not scary, though cool. But man, Silent Hill 4 ghosts! That give you headaches just by being near you! And that slowly melt through walls, torsos sticking out, infecting the walls with rust and blood. That stay down for only ten seconds when you beat them enough. That float around, some of them on fire, with rotting faces. I mean, Silent Hill 1-3 were sweet games (not that I played very far into them, mind you). You've got guns, and the scares, though disturbing, are awesome. I don't know why Silent Hill 4 is so much creepier. Maybe it's the room not healing you anymore halfway through the game, maybe its the progression from day to night, maybe its just the room, maybe even the fact that you have only melee weapons now.

That game really messed me up.

Weird thing is, I don't mind when I'm asleep. It's only being awake in the dark that scares me. I consciously know that's irrational, but I'm still like that. Right now, I'm a little scared, but back then, I was terrified. Lights on in other rooms calm me down, even if there's no one there. Gives the impression that there are others around. Another irrational conclusion.

But hey, I have been called irrational :D.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby koneko » Tue Apr 08, 2008 5:21 am UTC

a toddler's pronunciation guide:

duck = guck
fish = pishy
dog = a puppies
frog = frock
blanket = badeet
milk = muck
juice, goose = deuce
mine = mice
ball, esp. blue = a boobaa
weasel = reasher
enough = muff
sit = shit
fork, fish, fire truck = fuck
deena = nina
veronica = conka
jennifer = heifer
joseph = dadarsh
thomas = momas [like a cross between "mom" and "thomas"]
ashley = assoo, ashoo, assey, ashey, "a mommy"
mommy = daddy
elmo = mo, memo, melmo, momo
cookie monster = elmo
Last edited by koneko on Wed Apr 09, 2008 1:14 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby '; DROP DATABASE;-- » Tue Apr 08, 2008 8:15 am UTC

I remember thinking/being told that if I closed one eye, then opened it and closed the other, and kept doing this over and over, I would go blind.
Arsin wrote:I thought that turning the computer off using the Off button on the tower, or using the Reset button, would eventually damage and destroy your computer.
Just shutting right off without going through the OS' shutdown process can corrupt files, sometimes pretty badly.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby GCM » Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:16 am UTC

koneko wrote:ball, esp. blue = a boob


Acqica sa?

koneko wrote:cookie monster = elmo


Yeah, I hate it when that happens.
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Kabann » Tue Apr 08, 2008 10:19 am UTC

When I was 4 or 5, my mother warned me not to leave sugar out or spill it, because we'd get ants. Of course, I was then convinced that sugar was ant eggs.
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So far, I've got a sense of humor.
It's a good start.

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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby ishikiri » Tue Apr 08, 2008 1:23 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
parkaboy wrote:i remember learning that molecules vibrate. and i thought "if the molecules of the wall vibrate, and mine vibrate too, if i can just (consciously) synch up my molecules to the walls, i should be able to pass through it" i dont think i ever shared this theory with anyone.

That's pretty much the operating theory behind The Flash running through walls and such.


Same with Kitty pride/Shadowkat.

I couldn't pronounce "squirell" for a very long time. I still have to think about it now, otherwise its "squilrell".
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Torvaun » Tue Apr 08, 2008 1:35 pm UTC

ishikiri wrote:I couldn't pronounce "squirell" for a very long time. I still have to think about it now, otherwise its "squilrell".

Is it ever "squirrel"?
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Apr 08, 2008 1:48 pm UTC

ishikiri wrote:
SecondTalon wrote:
parkaboy wrote:VIBRATE THROUGH WALLS!
LIKE THE FLASH?
Same with Kitty pride/Shadowkat.
Really? I didn't realize she was a vibrater. No wonder all the girls love her.

*rimshot* *crickets*
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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Postby Mo0man » Tue Apr 08, 2008 6:46 pm UTC

I used to think "Backstreet Girls" and "Spice Boys" were totally creative and unique names for bands
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