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Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:23 pm UTC
by fersrs
You got money ever time something bad happened; Millionaires were rich because they were unhappy all the time. This was probably caused by hearing things about money not buying happiness, there were also a lot of arguments over it when my parents got divorced, and my mom gave me 5 dollars when my cousin broke my Barbie Pegasus.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 4:05 am UTC
by Namaps
Hefty One wrote:When I was a child I remember thinking a sheet of paper was 2-dimensional.


This pissed me off to no end as a kid. Teachers would often cite paper as an example of something that was two dimensional, but thanks to a disgusting amount of exposure to videogames, I knew what 2D really meant, and that's SIDE-SCROLLERS... and also no depth, because plants in 3D games were often composed of just a couple 2D planes and would often be neigh invisible if you were looking at it from the wrong angle. What frustrated me the most though is that teachers would argue with me when I corrected them. How stupid do you have to be to understand that a piece of paper is a three dimensional object?

It still irritates me to this day.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 5:00 am UTC
by frogman
I used to think that all TV was live. When they zoomed forward in time, it confused me to no end.

I also used to think that they had to re-animate or film the theme song each time they made a new episode.

Video editing was an amazing discovery.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Mon Sep 14, 2009 7:58 am UTC
by Benstudios
I used to think that my big brothers were awesome.

Thank god for their girlfriends.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 4:33 am UTC
by Bulvox
I just now remembered that I used to think that you died every time you went to sleep, and that you were revived when you woke up. I don't know where I got that conception from.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 5:21 am UTC
by guyy
Benstudios wrote:I used to think that my big brothers were awesome.


Being a big brother myself, I never really realized that big brothers are supposed to be assholes to their younger siblings. But they aren't exactly nice to me...I don't even know whether that was a good thing.

Also, I used to think that school buses said "Stop when red lights flash" on the back because the bus only had to stop at a red light if it was flashing. I don't know when I finally realized that didn't make sense...

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 2:46 pm UTC
by Plasma Man
If you plant a cucumber, it will grow up into a marrow.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:24 pm UTC
by kapojinha
Plasma Man wrote:If you plant a cucumber, it will grow up into a marrow.

...how did you come up with that idea? :shock:

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 3:03 am UTC
by Kurushimi
kapojinha wrote:
Plasma Man wrote:If you plant a cucumber, it will grow up into a marrow.

...how did you come up with that idea? :shock:


Isn't it obvious? Cucumbers look a lot like marrow seeds to me.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 5:21 am UTC
by lulzfish
Kurushimi wrote:
kapojinha wrote:
Plasma Man wrote:If you plant a cucumber, it will grow up into a marrow.

...how did you come up with that idea? :shock:


Isn't it obvious? Cucumbers look a lot like marrow seeds to me.


USA-ican question:

What's a marrow?

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:34 am UTC
by Plasma Man
This
Image
is a marrow.

And yes, I just came up with it because they looked similar. I also thought that courgettes and cucumbers were two different fruit from the same plant.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 12:00 pm UTC
by Grop
My grandparents used to grow huge gherkins and claim they were cucumbers.

Alas, they would serve them as such.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 12:32 pm UTC
by Decker
I used to wonder what the little hole in the middle of bars of deorderant was for.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 19, 2009 3:35 am UTC
by kapojinha
Kurushimi wrote:Isn't it obvious? Cucumbers look a lot like marrow seeds to me.

Ohh. I thought you meant bone marrow or something. :P

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 19, 2009 5:01 am UTC
by lulzfish
kapojinha wrote:
Kurushimi wrote:Isn't it obvious? Cucumbers look a lot like marrow seeds to me.

Ohh. I thought you meant bone marrow or something. :P


Nah, I guess it's like a zucchini or something.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 19, 2009 12:03 pm UTC
by Kurushimi
kapojinha wrote:
Kurushimi wrote:Isn't it obvious? Cucumbers look a lot like marrow seeds to me.

Ohh. I thought you meant bone marrow or something. :P


Actually, I had no idea what a marrow was at the time. I was being completely sarcastic.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 9:58 pm UTC
by TheTedinator
Childhood misconception: It's pronounced HY-po-TEN-use.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 11:16 pm UTC
by Codie
Grop wrote:My grandparents used to grow huge gherkins and claim they were cucumbers.

Alas, they would serve them as such.


My grandpa served deli chicken on Thanksgiving and called it "turkey".

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 11:25 pm UTC
by electronic mily
I went for years and years without ever seeing the word 'dentures' written down, and so I concluded that the correct spelling was probably 'denchers.' 'Dench' always seemed like a reasonable onomatopoeia for biting your teeth together, so it made sense at the time. I suspect that someday I'm going to spell it like that by accident and things are going to get really awkward.

Dench dench dench...

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 10:47 am UTC
by Naurgul
When I was around 12 or 13, before learning about the existence of programming languages, I thought videogames could be made with Microsoft Access. It was the only Office application I didn't understand what it did and making videogames and other complex programs seemed like the only thing about computers I didn't know how was done. So, I put two and two together and... yeah.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 2:05 pm UTC
by SecondTalon
You're better than I, then. I thought it was done in a text editor. Without a compiler or anything, that if you just renamed an .exe to .txt and knew what you were doing, you could tell what the code was doing.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 2:14 pm UTC
by Naurgul
SecondTalon wrote:You're better than I, then. I thought it was done in a text editor. Without a compiler or anything, that if you just renamed an .exe to .txt and knew what you were doing, you could tell what the code was doing.

It's technically true, for large enough values of "know what you are doing".

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 2:17 pm UTC
by Grop
Me too, because I had to edit these .bat files quite early. I was quite frustated at not understanding .exe files.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 4:56 am UTC
by Codie
Grop wrote:Me too, because I had to edit these .bat files quite early. I was quite frustated at not understanding .exe files.


I tried doing that, and then was surprised that the open source program then became unrunnable. (Because most text editors add the CR and/or LF. Luckily I discovered the Hex Editor program, so it would work as long as they didn't include checksums in the files.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 5:11 pm UTC
by PhoenixEnigma
Codie wrote:
Grop wrote:Me too, because I had to edit these .bat files quite early. I was quite frustated at not understanding .exe files.


I tried doing that, and then was surprised that the open source program then became unrunnable. (Because most text editors add the CR and/or LF. Luckily I discovered the Hex Editor program, so it would work as long as they didn't include checksums in the files.


If I've got this right, you edit(ed) your open source programs by directly modifying the executable via a hex editor, not by altering and recompiling the (presumably freely available, hence open source) code? I'm not sure if that's extremely impressive or extremely stupid . . .

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 5:19 pm UTC
by Naurgul
Perhaps he said that in a humorous attempt to stop big corporations from suing him since most commercial software licenses have clauses that prohibit you from reverse-engineering them and I guess editing the executable can be considered as doing that. Or maybe I'm just reading too much into it and the software he first experimented with these things on just happened to be open source and he randomly decided to include that information.

Reading back my post, I probably give the impression that I am a really insane person, don't I?

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 1:10 am UTC
by Alpha Omicron
Naurgul wrote:commercial software licenses have clauses that prohibit you from reverse-engineering them [...]
But open source software specifically grants you this ability.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 2:29 am UTC
by CombustibleLemons
that when two people got married the wife magically got pregnant.
Now that i think about it my theory doesn't count for single moms.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 3:11 pm UTC
by Gears
Pretty much everyone I know was conceived out of wedlock, and therefor that's how they're married. (Everyone was an "oops") This is why people get married and for no other reason, you see.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 4:22 pm UTC
by kernelpanic
Ran4 wrote:I thought that I could read when I was 2. I couldn't. I pretend-readed. A year later, when I was 3, I saw someone around 2 do the same thing, and I thought that it was completely stupid... But I didn't realized that I did that just a year before, I didn't get that until a few days later.
That's still one of my most embarrassing memories: me pretend-reading. I mean, c'mon! It's so silly and stupid.
Ugh, if I ever get kids, I won't be afraid that my children will be gay or something arbitrarily like that; I'll be scared senseless that my child might one day pretend-read. :|

Something similar happened to me when I was about 3. I knew how to use a computer (meaning turn it on, put the CD inside, play the game, exit the game, turn it off), but I never played when my mom was home because she used the computer for work. I thought I couldn't use a computer because whenever any of her friends asked, she said I didn't know. She was surprised when she got home one day and I was playing. (Because of that, I thought using a computer meant typing very very fast with the keyboard)

And the time I was about 5 and got a system crash in Mac OS 8. This is what comes on:
Image
Needless to say, I fled the house in terror screaming "It's going to explode!". A neighbor found me in a park next to where I live, whimpering. The result? My dad had to reinstall the OS, using the CD. For the next 3 years I thought bomb squads were simply installing a program on the bombs so they wouldn't explode.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 1:52 am UTC
by '; DROP DATABASE;--
I learned to read pretty early in life, but my brother took a while. For a few years I wondered what it was like to not be able to read, since I couldn't remember. Did the letters just look blurry? Could he not see them? I didn't get that you could see the letters, but not know what they mean.

I also remember not quite understanding the concept of a million, when on a Simpsons episode, Bart and Lisa missed a one-time showing of a special Itchy and Scratchy episode. They got back just in time to see Krusty say "they'll never let us show that again in a million years!" I didn't get what they were so upset about... so you have to wait a little while?
In another case someone told me the dinosaurs went extinct 65 million years ago. Since that was a year ago, I started saying 66 million instead. I eventually learned the concept of a million, but still didn't know about rounding, so I updated my figure to 65,000,001.

At one point I had the brilliant idea that if I told people I was blind, they'd believe me, and not mind me wandering into places I shouldn't, because I'd have no way of knowing.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 11:25 am UTC
by Senefen
God made Eve from Adam's rib, therefore girls have one more rib than boys. I never got on cop shows why they couldn't tell if the skeleton was from a guy or a girl, just count the ribs! XD

I somehow managed to uninstall windows 95 while trying to play monopoly as a kid. I clicked a bunch of things, the game didn't open so I clicked OK then went on to the next one.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 8:50 pm UTC
by Sir_Elderberry
Senefen wrote:God made Eve from Adam's rib, therefore girls have one more rib than boys. I never got on cop shows why they couldn't tell if the skeleton was from a guy or a girl, just count the ribs! XD

This is actually really common. Like, to the point that I've met adults who think this.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 4:20 am UTC
by Codie
Rd
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
Senefen wrote:God made Eve from Adam's rib, therefore girls have one more rib than boys. I never got on cop shows why they couldn't tell if the skeleton was from a guy or a girl, just count the ribs! XD

This is actually really common. Like, to the point that I've met adults who think this.


Yeah, I thought that too.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 4:34 am UTC
by lulzfish
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
Senefen wrote:God made Eve from Adam's rib, therefore girls have one more rib than boys. I never got on cop shows why they couldn't tell if the skeleton was from a guy or a girl, just count the ribs! XD

This is actually really common. Like, to the point that I've met adults who think this.


How silly. Obviously God, being all-knowing, and having a Plan, would have seen this coming, and built Adam with an extra rib on one side, so he could remove it later to build Eve. :D And to cover his tracks.

Just like how scorpions have more legs on one side, or something. Maybe it's lobsters. I forget.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 5:12 am UTC
by Maseiken
lulzfish wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
Senefen wrote:God made Eve from Adam's rib, therefore girls have one more rib than boys. I never got on cop shows why they couldn't tell if the skeleton was from a guy or a girl, just count the ribs! XD

This is actually really common. Like, to the point that I've met adults who think this.


How silly. Obviously God, being all-knowing, and having a Plan, would have seen this coming, and built Adam with an extra rib on one side, so he could remove it later to build Eve. :D And to cover his tracks.

Just like how scorpions have more legs on one side, or something. Maybe it's lobsters. I forget.

I can't remember where I read it, but I read a Genesis storybook at some point which concluded, quite matter-of-factly that this was why, AS WE ALL KNOW, men have one less rib than women. Luckily I wasn't paying much attention, possibly preoccupied with whatever I was interested in at the time, and mostly forgot about it until now.

(Unless that's a constructed memory I got from reading this thread (that sometimes happens))

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:18 am UTC
by lulzfish
I remember this one time I had a constructed memory, it was while I was reading the Wikipedia article on con-...
No, wait..

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:47 pm UTC
by the_bandersnatch
Sir_Elderberry wrote:
Senefen wrote:God made Eve from Adam's rib, therefore girls have one more rib than boys. I never got on cop shows why they couldn't tell if the skeleton was from a guy or a girl, just count the ribs! XD

This is actually really common. Like, to the point that I've met adults who think this.


My parents still believe this. My cries of "count them, then!" are just met with blank stares.

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 1:58 pm UTC
by SecondTalon
The logic of "How many one-armed men have one-armed children" doesn't work?

Re: Childhood misconceptions

Posted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 2:09 pm UTC
by the_bandersnatch
Ah, yes but one-armed men haven't been touched by God's spirit magic :wink: