Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:29 pm UTC

somitomi wrote:
This reminds me of a children's story I quite like, where two people standing in the rain talk about improving the umbrella to make standing in the rain less unpleasant. They add walls, a frame (so they don't need to hold it above their heads), floor, windows and even a stove and they're pretty satisfied with themselves until they realise they invented the tent.

So one time I spent about 20 minutes re-designing Mecha in my head to be something more sensible and "real world" applicable, as well as semi-field serviceable, by stripping away, replacing, or redesigning the existing features (arms, legs, head, etc. Arms go because hardmounts are more stable, legs turn to treads because of stability, serviceability, and less that can go wrong. Sensor package in the head is distributed across the body so one hit won't take it out, etc....)

The end design was a tank.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Mutex » Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:02 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
somitomi wrote:
This reminds me of a children's story I quite like, where two people standing in the rain talk about improving the umbrella to make standing in the rain less unpleasant. They add walls, a frame (so they don't need to hold it above their heads), floor, windows and even a stove and they're pretty satisfied with themselves until they realise they invented the tent.

So one time I spent about 20 minutes re-designing Mecha in my head to be something more sensible and "real world" applicable, as well as semi-field serviceable, by stripping away, replacing, or redesigning the existing features (arms, legs, head, etc. Arms go because hardmounts are more stable, legs turn to treads because of stability, serviceability, and less that can go wrong. Sensor package in the head is distributed across the body so one hit won't take it out, etc....)

The end design was a tank.

This was a confusing read until I realised you weren't talking about Mecca. Turns out spelling matters.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Quercus » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:27 pm UTC

Mecca/Mecha mashup:

Pro - hassle free Hajj, just wait till Meccha visits your neighbourhood.

Con - difficult to keep track of which way to face to pray, may require some form of automated turntable if Meccha is moving particularly quickly.

(question: does this cross the line for religious insenstivity? I don't think so, but I'm not absolutely certain)

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:28 am UTC

Today I ate pulse candy (apparently the average person in the world ate four of them last year). Specifically Kachcha Aam flavor.

What I learned was that "flavor explosion" (while not literally true) need not be an overstatement.

Half an hour later I learned that gargling and pouring water up your nose doesn't help get a smell out.

Eleven hours later I'm still waiting to learn when I'll stop smelling mangoes.
The thing about recursion problems is that they tend to contain other recursion problems.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby SecondTalon » Wed Jan 10, 2018 3:44 pm UTC

.... I need that in my life. And nose.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby somitomi » Wed Jan 10, 2018 10:28 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:So one time I spent about 20 minutes re-designing Mecha in my head to be something more sensible and "real world" applicable, as well as semi-field serviceable, by stripping away, replacing, or redesigning the existing features (arms, legs, head, etc. Arms go because hardmounts are more stable, legs turn to treads because of stability, serviceability, and less that can go wrong. Sensor package in the head is distributed across the body so one hit won't take it out, etc....)

The end design was a tank.

This reminded me of a joke about a Soviet refrigerator factory, but I'll try to keep it to myself.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Peaceful Whale » Thu Jan 11, 2018 2:24 am UTC

somitomi wrote:This reminded me of a joke about a Soviet refrigerator factory, but I'll try to keep it to myself.


SHARE OR ELSE!!!
My meta for future reference
Spoiler:
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:15 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:.... I need that in my life. And nose.
It also had a nominal sulfur smell.
Which I'm not 100% sure is objectively there (I mean, I doubt it would be so popular in India if they all tasted a rotten egg in there) and I suspect may have something do with sent receptors overloading and getting confused.

The taste/smell has dissipated greatly, but not completely.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Quercus » Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:28 am UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:(I mean, I doubt it would be so popular in India if they all tasted a rotten egg in there)

I wouldn't be so sure about that

Kala namak consists primarily of sodium chloride and trace impurities of sodium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, sodium bisulfite, sodium sulfide, iron sulfide and hydrogen sulfide.

Sodium chloride provides kala namak with its salty taste, iron sulfide provides its dark violet hue, and all the sulfur compounds give kala namak its slight savory taste as well as a highly distinctive smell, with hydrogen sulfide being the most prominent contributor to the smell...

Kala namak is used extensively in South Asian cuisines of Bangladesh, Nepal, India and Pakistan as a condiment or added to chaats, chutneys, salads, all kinds of fruits, raitas and many other savory Indian snacks

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby somitomi » Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:06 am UTC

Peaceful Whale wrote:
somitomi wrote:This reminded me of a joke about a Soviet refrigerator factory, but I'll try to keep it to myself.


SHARE OR ELSE!!!

After 40 years a worker retires from a Soviet refrigerator factory and a little celebration is organised for the occasion. The worker is congratulated by the managers of the plant and a reporter makes an interview with him.
- So tell me, do you have a refrigerator at home?
- No, I never had one.
- Really? You worked at the refrigerator company for forty years and never tried to sneak one out in parts?
- Oh I tried three times, but no matter how I assembled it, I always ended up with a tank.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Ginger » Tue Jan 16, 2018 5:07 pm UTC

TIL: Shiva can be a man or a woman, is the god or goddess of creation/rebirth and destruction, has multiple arms and can kick my lily white lady butt up and down the streets like twice or thrice or INFINITELY B/C He/She's a god or goddess damn. <3 u soooo much Shiva girl. And as well I learned the link to Blizz's forums code of conduct.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby addams » Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:30 am UTC

Today someone on the Flora was being a Smart Ass.
It made me Google. Therefore, I learned something.
Date palms can take 4 to 8 years after planting before they will bear fruit.
Date palms start producing viable yields for commercial harvest between 7 and 10 years.
Shrug...It's not useful knowledge, for me.
You might be able to plant a date tree and eat its fruit.
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Some of us see The Gutter.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Ginger » Mon Jan 22, 2018 2:23 am UTC

addams wrote:Today someone on the Flora was being a Smart Ass.
It made me Google. Therefore, I learned something.
Date palms can take 4 to 8 years after planting before they will bear fruit.
Date palms start producing viable yields for commercial harvest between 7 and 10 years.
Shrug...It's not useful knowledge, for me.
You might be able to plant a date tree and eat its fruit.

TIL addams is like a botanist or somethin' who knew? I learned several other things today: Something about my father, something about me, and lots of new articles about news and the worlds' woes and whatnot. AND That the Romans just took Greek Gods and Goddesses then renamed them.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Liri » Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:14 am UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:
SecondTalon wrote:.... I need that in my life. And nose.
It also had a nominal sulfur smell.
Which I'm not 100% sure is objectively there (I mean, I doubt it would be so popular in India if they all tasted a rotten egg in there) and I suspect may have something do with sent receptors overloading and getting confused.

The taste/smell has dissipated greatly, but not completely.

The ones I ordered arrived today. Oh dear. The sulfur has arrived.

It's like a sweet firework.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby poxic » Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:26 am UTC

Can't say you weren't warned.

Also can't say I'm not mildly intrigued.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby natraj » Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:10 am UTC

pulse candy is so good now i want some in my face
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Liri » Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:56 am UTC

natraj wrote:pulse candy is so good now i want some in my face

I liked it. I was uncertain about bringing them in to work but they're totes fine.
He wondered could you eat the mushrooms, would you die, do you care.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby flicky1991 » Thu Feb 01, 2018 7:24 pm UTC

I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!
any pronouns
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Quercus » Thu Feb 01, 2018 10:30 pm UTC

flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

Seriously? That's silly and I refuse to do it.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Ginger » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:00 pm UTC

TIL: How to use the Blizzards' shop to buy a new expansion for my little game... and it boosted Ravasha to 110 yay! <3
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby chridd » Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:22 am UTC

flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!
That's actually how I pronounced it in my head back when I'd only seen it in writing (and I still sometimes pronounce it that way in my head).
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Mutex » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:25 am UTC

flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:58 pm UTC

Southern English what now? Southern England English, or Southern US English? Southern Australian English?

At any rate, pass and parse don't rhyme. Farce and parse do. Or the first part of Larceny. Parseny.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Mutex » Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:12 pm UTC

Yes I meant "Southern English pronunciation" to mean "pronunciation from the south of England". You know, us people who pronounce the letter 'A' like it's 'Ar' a lot. Hence "pass" and "parse" would sound the same if the S in parse is soft.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:37 pm UTC

Hmmmm..... I don't believe I've ever heard the sort of person who pronounces water "warter" use the word parse.

At any rate, sure, USAsians say it like that dialect says pass. Probably.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby DavidSh » Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:16 pm UTC

It would be better if we all used and understood IPA. English-speakers from different parts of the world pronounce 'r' differently. I suspect SecondTalon is rhotic, while Mutex is non-rhotic.

I had thought south-west England still had holdouts that pronounced "Arr" differently from "A", but maybe that pronunciation (stereotypically assigned to pirates) has gone.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Mutex » Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:31 pm UTC

The west country also pronounces As like the rest of the country and the US, I was simplifying a bit when I said southern England.

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby HES » Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:04 pm UTC

Southern England generally means South-East England.

And for me, hailing from Southern England, pass, parse and farce all rhyme.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:24 pm UTC

DavidSh wrote:I suspect SecondTalon is rhotic....


RoadToElDorado.Gif

I'm from an area where mostly Southern and Midwestern, but a little Northern and Appalachian mash together, with Seasame Street slammed on top.

I don't know what the fuck my accent and dialect are. "Yes" is probably the best answer.

It also doesn't help that my tendency to use words like Ain't increases with my proximity of other people who use said words regularly.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby chridd » Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:38 pm UTC

Mutex wrote:TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?
Mutex wrote:Yes I meant "Southern English pronunciation" to mean "pronunciation from the south of England". You know, us people who pronounce the letter 'A' like it's 'Ar' a lot. Hence "pass" and "parse" would sound the same if the S in parse is soft.
No, because most Americans have an "r" sound (similar to the "r" in "red") in between the "a" and "s" sounds. From a General American perspective, typical Southern England accents not only don't pronounce "a" like "ar", but don't even pronounce "ar" like "ar" (rather, they pronounce "ar" like "a"). (Except before vowels, but it's not before a vowel in "parse".)
From my understanding, Southern England pass would be /pɑːs/, Southern England farce would be /fɑːs/. A Southern English person pronouncing "parse" the American way would probably pronounce it /pɑːs/, which would be the same as "pass".
American parse would be /pɑɚs/, American farce would be /fɑɚs/, with the extra /ɚ/ (represented by the letter "r", and mostly predictable from spelling) that doesn't really occur in many British dialects. If an American were to pronounce "pass" the Southern England way for some reason, they'd say /pɑːs/, which doesn't rhyme with /pɑɚs/.

In rhotic dialects, spa/spar, pita/Peter, law/lore, stalk/stark/stork (and in general, pretty much any word spelled with an "r"/any word spelled without an "r") are all distinct, whereas in most nonrhotic dialects some of those are homophones.
Last edited by chridd on Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:49 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby flicky1991 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:48 pm UTC

chridd wrote:In rhotic dialects, spa/spar, pita/Peter, law/lore, stalk/stark/stork (and in general, pretty much any word spelled with an "r"/any word spelled without an "r") are all distinct, whereas in most nonrhotic dialects some of those are homophones.
For me:
spa/spar are homophones
pita/Peter are distinct on the first vowel (first syllables sound like "pit" and "peat" respectively)
law/lore are homophones
stalk/stark/stork are all distinct but stalk/stork are very similar to each other ("stark" sounds very different vowel-wise to the other two, to me - I can't really imagine an accent where it matches the other two?)
any pronouns
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Pfhorrest » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:35 am UTC

Worth noting that in most American dialects, the vowels in "pass" and "parse" are difference. I can't type IPA on here easily, but "pass" has that "nasal" "American" a-vowel written with an ae digraph in IPA, while "parse" does not. Pass rhymes with ass, parse rhymes with arse.
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Ginger » Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:32 am UTC

TIL: That despite goblins being bust on my comp... I can still race change my boring orc huntress to a goblin woman and play as her instead. <3 :)
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Coyne » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:01 pm UTC

Mutex wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?

No, we say it like we say, "sparse," only without the leading sss sound.

So, does southern England say it, "sparze?"
Last edited by Coyne on Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:04 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
In all fairness...

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby flicky1991 » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:03 pm UTC

Coyne wrote:
Mutex wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?

No, we say it like we say, "sparse," only without the leading sss sound.
You see, the confusing thing is that "sparse" and "pass" rhyme in Southern English. :P Everyone in this conversation is defining every comparison differently.
any pronouns
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Coyne » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:07 pm UTC

flicky1991 wrote:
Coyne wrote:
Mutex wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?

No, we say it like we say, "sparse," only without the leading sss sound.
You see, the confusing thing is that "sparse" and "pass" rhyme in Southern English. :P Everyone in this conversation is defining every comparison differently.

"Spass?" I thought that was the Bostonian pronunciation. :P
In all fairness...

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Quercus » Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:36 pm UTC

Coyne wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:
Coyne wrote:
Mutex wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?

No, we say it like we say, "sparse," only without the leading sss sound.
You see, the confusing thing is that "sparse" and "pass" rhyme in Southern English. :P Everyone in this conversation is defining every comparison differently.

"Spass?" I thought that was the Bostonian pronunciation. :P

S'not called New England for nothing

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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby Coyne » Sat Feb 03, 2018 1:24 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:
Coyne wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:
Coyne wrote:
Mutex wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I learned yesterday that the correct way to pronounce "parse" in British English has a "z" sound instead of "s". I just thought my team leader was pronouncing it wrong when he said it, but then I looked it up!

TIL that Americans pronounce "parse" with a soft S, I guess. Really? I'm sure I've never heard that before. You say it like the Southern English pronunciation of "pass"?

No, we say it like we say, "sparse," only without the leading sss sound.
You see, the confusing thing is that "sparse" and "pass" rhyme in Southern English. :P Everyone in this conversation is defining every comparison differently.

"Spass?" I thought that was the Bostonian pronunciation. :P

S'not called New England for nothing

"What's not there, Snotty?"

Spoiler:
Warning: bad script, bad puns, bad jokes that aren't puns, bad video, older than the hills, obscure references...
https://youtu.be/ioH0POPyeEQ
In all fairness...

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chridd
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby chridd » Sun Feb 04, 2018 8:27 am UTC

Coyne wrote:"Spass?" I thought that was the Bostonian pronunciation. :P
...because the Boston dialect is non-rhotic, and so are many British dialects.

Does this clear up the confusion?

Code: Select all

                  trap   pass   sparse* parse
General American  /tɹæp/ /pæs/  /spɑɚs/ /pɑɚs/
Northern England  /tɹæp/ /pæs/  /spɑːs/ /pɑː(s/z)/
Southern England  /tɹæp/ /pɑːs/ /spɑːs/ /pɑː(s/z)/
* and farce


flicky1991 wrote:For me:
spa/spar are homophones
pita/Peter are distinct on the first vowel (first syllables sound like "pit" and "peat" respectively)
law/lore are homophones
stalk/stark/stork are all distinct but stalk/stork are very similar to each other ("stark" sounds very different vowel-wise to the other two, to me - I can't really imagine an accent where it matches the other two?)
...which means your dialect is nonrhotic. I pronounce pita and Peter both with peat on the first syllable; the second syllable is different for me. I'm not sure there are any dialects where stalk = stark, but in my dialect the vowels of stalk and stark are the same and the only difference is whether there's an r sound. (For me, stalk = stock = /stɑːk/ (father/spa vowel), which I think is the same as British "stark"; stark = /stɑɚk/; stork is /stɔɚk/ or /stoɚk/)
~ chri d. d. /tʃɹɪ.di.di/ (Phonotactics, schmphonotactics) · she(?)(?(?)(?))(?(?(?))(?))(?) · Forum game scores
mittfh wrote:I wish this post was very quotable...
flicky1991 wrote:In both cases the quote is "I'm being quoted too much!"

DavidSh
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Re: Lucky Ten Thousand (TIL)

Postby DavidSh » Sun Feb 04, 2018 6:47 pm UTC

chridd wrote:... I'm not sure there are any dialects where stalk = stark, but in my dialect the vowels of stalk and stark are the same and the only difference is whether there's an r sound. (For me, stalk = stock = /stɑːk/ (father/spa vowel), which I think is the same as British "stark"; stark = /stɑɚk/; stork is /stɔɚk/ or /stoɚk/)


It sounds like you have the cot-caught merger.


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