Questions For The World

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:40 pm UTC

roband wrote:Back to pronunciations: how would you say "Wootton" and where are you from?

The right way, and near Wootton Bassett.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby quetzal1234 » Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:21 pm UTC

e^iπ+1=0 wrote:FWIW, many Americans can't really tell the difference between many English and Australian accents. It took me far longer than it should have to realize that one of my lecturers here is Australian. I can hear the difference now, after living in the UK for a couple years, but I definitely had a tough time of it back when I was in the US.

I can only tell the difference if they happen to say certain words. Oh, and those Australian radio announcers who make it totally obvious.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:27 pm UTC

Most games in France are played clockwise; a few card games are played counter-clockwise (but in a casual context someone may forget about that and deal the first game clockwise : we will play in the order the cards were dealt).

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:59 pm UTC

roband wrote:Clicked and listened before reading the rest of your post, thought to myself "I'm sure this guy was meant to be Australian".

But my only experience of Australian is Neighbours and Fosters adverts, so they clearly turn it up to 11.

I'd have to check with my girlfriend because she mentioned it to me as part of her Phonetics study, but there are, IIRC, about 2-3 main accents in Australia, including received pronunciation (which is close to BBC English) and a more vernacular one like you're thinking of. I have a very received pronunciation too, and actually have to think if I'm trying to put on a Steve Irwin-type accent.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:26 pm UTC

emceng wrote:This might need to be answered by non-English native speakers to get a good perspective but here's my question - when playing a game, or taking turns in a circle, we always pass the turn to the left. Basically, in a 4 player game, play rotates clockwise, from north to east to south to west. Does anyone go in reverse order?

I'm used to playing all my games clockwise by default, unless there's some special rule for turn order (the most common I can think of is that the game includes some reversible turn order mechanic). I'm from the UK.

My best friend, from Illinois, USA, doesn't have a strong preference for which direction turns go in, and always asks before we start playing, but tends towards anti-clockwise if she's the one deciding. I'm not sure why this is, it strikes me as strange as almost everyone I've ever played games with automatically assumes clockwise. She's left-handed, so it might be related to that somehow, I guess.
Last edited by Adacore on Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:27 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Ralith The Third » Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:27 pm UTC

I like widdershins myself, but most games I play have rules set out for it.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby New User » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:10 am UTC

Here in the United States, some foods that are eaten in other parts of the world are considered culturally unacceptable, or perhaps it's better to say they are considered disgusting and unappetizing. For example, I remember meeting a man from the Philippines who told me an amusing story about buying a live dog at a market and taking it home and slaughtering it, which was normal for his family. Here in the USA, most people wouldn't want to eat dog meat, since dogs are considered to be adorable household pets instead of livestock. I also hear that boiled duck embryos called Balut are popular in that area of the world. When the Olympics was in Beijing a few years ago, I remember seeing news articles about the strange foods eaten there, such as scorpions, beetles and other arthropods being sold as snacks. In the USA, I have never met anyone who eats arthropods (except crabs and lobsters), and partly-developed poultry embryos would make most people gag.

So my question for the world is, which foods eaten here in the United States are considered disgusting or unacceptable in your culture?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:40 am UTC

American cheese.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:51 am UTC

I don't think anything eaten in the US would be taboo in France.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby eran_rathan » Tue Oct 29, 2013 12:56 pm UTC

mountain oysters?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby yurell » Tue Oct 29, 2013 1:06 pm UTC

I can't think of anything that would be taboo in Australia, either, although there may be some trouble with the difference in palette.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Tue Oct 29, 2013 1:14 pm UTC

yurell wrote:I can't think of anything that would be taboo in Australia, either, although there may be some trouble with the difference in palette.


Aussies will eat anything, as evidenced by their consumption of Marmite.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 2:15 pm UTC

eran_rathan wrote:mountain oysters?

Nah, those are eaten pretty much everywhere they have farm animals. You'd need to look at something like scrapple.... and it's probably fine in France too. I mean, chitlins are eaten pretty much worldwide under a variety of names. Same with cracklins. Scrapple's the only strange food I can find that might be unique to the US, and you can't get it everywhere in the US anyway.

That being said, it's not so much that people elsewhere wouldn't eat it, it's that people elsewhere haven't combined the ingredients in mostly the same way to create a similar product. They still eat it's component ingredients in other dishes.

We're kinda prudish when it comes to food - we don't actually eat anything too strange. I mean, aside from Twinkies.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Tue Oct 29, 2013 2:26 pm UTC

Yes, scrapple seems to be weird, but I don't see any unacceptable ingredient.

People who won't eat offal wouldn't agree to eat this, but I expect you have them in your country as well.

(I haven't heard of eating bull testicles in France, but it doesn't seem off-limits).

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby yurell » Tue Oct 29, 2013 2:44 pm UTC

emceng wrote:Aussies will eat anything, as evidenced by their consumption of Marmite.


You're thinking of the Brits; we do Vegemite.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Tue Oct 29, 2013 2:56 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Scrapple's the only strange food I can find that might be unique to the US, and you can't get it everywhere in the US anyway.

Grits?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bluebambue » Tue Oct 29, 2013 3:51 pm UTC

It is very unusual to find Grits in Seattle and I'm not sure if I've ever eaten them.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 4:50 pm UTC

bentheimmigrant wrote:
SexyTalon wrote:Scrapple's the only strange food I can find that might be unique to the US, and you can't get it everywhere in the US anyway.

Grits?

"Ground-up-grain-boiled-in-water" is a pretty simple dish most cultures have. While maize is specifically New World... so are potatoes, tomatoes and chilis. The rest of the world has adopted them pretty easily.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Ptolom » Tue Oct 29, 2013 5:39 pm UTC

Peanut butter and jam. It's always peanut butter or jam in the UK.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:46 pm UTC

I've heard that peanut butter is considered freaky in some places. Maybe just the colour and/or consistency, since peanuts by themselves aren't very weird.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:48 pm UTC

Ptolom wrote:Peanut butter and jam. It's always peanut butter or jam in the UK.

.. huh. Meanwhile, I always put peanut butter and preserves on fresh toast. Heat from it semi-melts the peanut butter into the bread.

.. also, you have to thinly put it on both sides, and the preserves in the middle. Bread doesn't get all goopy that way.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Zarq » Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:51 pm UTC

poxic wrote:I've heard that peanut butter is considered freaky in some places. Maybe just the colour and/or consistency, since peanuts by themselves aren't very weird.


Peanut butter is considered to be something stereotypically Dutch in Belgium.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Tue Oct 29, 2013 8:55 pm UTC

The thought of peanut butter "semi-melt"ing into toast makes me want to vomit.

I've never liked the stuff. It's just not quite right.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby emceng » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:09 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
Ptolom wrote:Peanut butter and jam. It's always peanut butter or jam in the UK.

.. huh. Meanwhile, I always put peanut butter and preserves on fresh toast. Heat from it semi-melts the peanut butter into the bread.

.. also, you have to thinly put it on both sides, and the preserves in the middle. Bread doesn't get all goopy that way.


I take English muffins, toast them, then slather with butter and peanut butter(or chocolate peanut butter). Melty pb is amazing.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:13 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:.. also, you have to thinly put it on both sides, and the preserves in the middle. Bread doesn't get all goopy that way.

You butter both sides of your toast?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:16 pm UTC

SurgicalSteel wrote:
SexyTalon wrote:.. also, you have to thinly put it on both sides, and the preserves in the middle. Bread doesn't get all goopy that way.

You butter both sides of your toast?

No, that part was about a sandwich (but maybe toasted still).

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby eran_rathan » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:17 pm UTC

SurgicalSteel wrote:
SexyTalon wrote:.. also, you have to thinly put it on both sides, and the preserves in the middle. Bread doesn't get all goopy that way.

You butter both sides of your toast?



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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Tue Oct 29, 2013 9:47 pm UTC

yurell wrote:
emceng wrote:Aussies will eat anything, as evidenced by their consumption of Marmite.


You're thinking of the Brits; we do Vegemite.

At our apartment, we have a jar of Vegemite (for Aussie me) and a jar of Marmite (for my Singaporean girlfriend). Neither of us is willing to budge on the superiority of our own spread, or the inedibility of the others'.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:07 pm UTC

Aren't they mostly the same thing?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:19 pm UTC

Obvious answer: hamburgers to many Indians. (The not-Native-Americans kind).

Also probably a lot of our processed meat foods that spend part of their production cycle as a pink liquid and are then condensed into a pink gel and sold as hot dogs or bologna or spam. (To many places with less processed food, not Indians specifically).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:26 pm UTC

roband wrote:
SurgicalSteel wrote:
SexyTalon wrote:.. also, you have to thinly put it on both sides, and the preserves in the middle. Bread doesn't get all goopy that way.

You butter both sides of your toast?

No, that part was about a sandwich (but maybe toasted still).
Ooohhh. When I think of toasted bread and peanut butter and jam/jelly, it's usually a 1 slice affair.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:43 pm UTC

no no. Sandwich, inner walls covered in peanut butter. From the top, it's Toast, Peanut Butter, Preserves, Peanut Butter, Toast.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby poxic » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:02 pm UTC

If I eat the sandwich soon enough after assembly, I tend to prefer only one layer of PB. The J will soak into the bread just enough to not squirt out the other end.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:06 pm UTC

I can't think of anything from US (or UK) cuisine that's taboo in Korea. Most Koreans won't eat American beef, because they think it's low quality and dangerous, due to a scandal a few years ago, and of course there are many foods that just aren't served here at all or are served in radically different ways, but I don't think anything from US cuisine is really a taboo in the same way as dogs or horses are to some people in the US.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Wednesday » Wed Oct 30, 2013 12:49 am UTC

Aw fuck I love spam. Fucking godawful amazing rez food I miss you.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:56 am UTC

Does nobody else eat peanut butter and honey sandwiches?

On a related note: does the phrase "open-faced sandwich" not make sense to anyone else? If I put peanut butter and honey on a slice of bread (toasted or not), I'd still call that a peanut butter and honey sandwich, just an open-faced one.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Wed Oct 30, 2013 2:04 am UTC

I'd know what you meant (although the term I've heard most often is just 'open sandwich'). In the UK, you'd probably just call it 'bread and X' if it wasn't toasted, or 'X on toast' if it was. I'd probably only describe something as an 'open sandwich' myself if it had two slices of bread, both with fillings/toppings on top, in such a way that it couldn't really be closed as a sandwich. Basically a way of increasing the filling to bread ratio.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Oct 30, 2013 2:10 am UTC

Hmm, now that I think about it, when I make an open-faced PB&H sandwich, I do always use two slices of bread. And I don't think of it as two sandwiches, I think of it as one, open-faced, sandwich. So I think I agree with your usage and didn't realize it until now.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Wed Oct 30, 2013 3:20 am UTC

poxic wrote:Aren't they mostly the same thing?

You would think so, wouldn't you? While there are similarities between Vegemite, Marmite (which is apparently slightly different depending on whether it's from the UK or New Zealand) and about 8 other yeast by-product spreads, there's enough of a difference between the flavours that people tend to prefer one over the rest (assuming they like any of them, of course).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Wed Oct 30, 2013 6:03 am UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:Does nobody else eat peanut butter and honey sandwiches?
I had one the other day and it was delicious. The way the honey soaks into the bread and makes a thin layer of sweet crunchiness is great. Also: peanut butter and sharp cheddar.
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