Questions For The World

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

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Yablo
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Yablo » Wed Oct 08, 2014 12:33 am UTC

Quercus wrote:
  • Learn bowing etiquette (basically the person of "lower status" bows deeper, and the relative difference in bow depth reflects the relative difference in status), I can't remember the status rules but they are fairly simple, at least for a foreign tourist, because as a visitor to the country you will have a lower formal status than most people you will meet.

Four years or so ago I went to South Korea for eleven days with a friend of mine. It was an amazing trip. Most signs had English words, and once we figured out the subway in Seoul, it was easy to get around. Every once in a while, a kid would run up to me, giggle, and say something like "Hello! Nice weather!" before running back to his or her group of friends so they could all laugh together.

We stopped in Narita airport in Tokyo on the way back, and it was the cleanest, most efficiently run place of that size I've ever seen. That's about the extent of my experience with Japan, however.

We get lots of tourists in Alaska, and I still catch myself bowing unconsciously whenever I deal with Asians. They always do the same.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby PolakoVoador » Wed Oct 08, 2014 1:13 pm UTC

Thanks Quercus and ConMan :)

I was planning on hoping around some more cities (more than a couple, at least), so I get like 5 to 7 days at the bigger ones, like Tokyo. I'm thinking about buying the 21-day JR Pass, but since I still don't know which cities I will visit, I can't check if it will be worth it.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Wed Oct 08, 2014 11:14 pm UTC

PolakoVoador wrote:Thanks Quercus and ConMan :)

I was planning on hoping around some more cities (more than a couple, at least), so I get like 5 to 7 days at the bigger ones, like Tokyo. I'm thinking about buying the 21-day JR Pass, but since I still don't know which cities I will visit, I can't check if it will be worth it.

Yeah, again, I'd suggest making the bigger cities your first and last ports of call, and just get the JR pass for the time in between. The only exception might be if you're using one of them as a home base to take a bunch of day trips out to satellite cities - Osaka is good for that, because there are JR lines connecting it to Kyoto, Nara, Kobe, and a few others, and it's also possible to take the shinkansen for a day trip to Hiroshima. I must admit I haven't visited much of East or North Japan other than Tokyo, so I don't know how well the same works in that area.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby fizzgig » Thu Oct 09, 2014 1:47 am UTC

My partner and I just got back from a trip to Japan and one of the things that we did that was a bit more unusual was going to visit a swordsmith. He explained (via a translator) the various stages of making a sword and showed us swords in some of the stages. He also gave us a demonstration of heating and hammering a bit of iron, and we got to have a go at the hammering. We also got to have a go with a finished sword. An iai master (? if that's what they're called) showed us how to hold and swing the sword and we had a bit of a crack with some wooden practice swords before slicing up some rolled up tatami mats with the real sword.

If you're interested in that kind of thing, we booked our trip through Inside Japan. They organised our entire trip, but you can probably talk to them about just doing a day trip or something. Info on their website is here, although that is not the swordsmith that we went to see.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Sat Oct 11, 2014 3:54 pm UTC

PolakoVoador wrote:Thanks Quercus and ConMan :)

I was planning on hoping around some more cities (more than a couple, at least), so I get like 5 to 7 days at the bigger ones, like Tokyo. I'm thinking about buying the 21-day JR Pass, but since I still don't know which cities I will visit, I can't check if it will be worth it.

I have never been to Japan.
I have given Japan some thought.

If I were going, I'd make a Run for Kyoto.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyoto#The_ ... itage_Site

I don't know how long it takes, once there.
I suppose, you can spend One Day or the rest of your life.

It seems so Mystical, from a distance.
Those places have been Treasured for a Long Time.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:08 pm UTC

One thing which I'm finding about living in the city rather than the countryside is that some of my best methods of stress relief aren't really possible any more. I realise this is kind of a tricky question, but can anyone suggest city-friendly versions of the following?

  1. Chopping firewood with a splitting maul. The key points here are that the activity should be physically exhausting, have a rhythm to it and actually accomplish something externally useful (otherwise lifting weights would work, and it doesn't).
  2. Walking in the hills to clear my head. The key points here are the feeling of isolation in nature (which I find immensely comforting, but I realise won't really be possible in a city), and again the physical exercise. I'm thinking going for a walk at 4 am might be my best option here, but can anyone suggest anything slightly safer?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Sun Oct 12, 2014 5:49 pm UTC

#1 - check with local charities, soup kitchens, food banks and so on. See if you can volunteer for manual labor of moving stuff around, maybe?

#2 check your local parks?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Sun Oct 12, 2014 6:58 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:#1 - check with local charities, soup kitchens, food banks and so on. See if you can volunteer for manual labor of moving stuff around, maybe?

#2 check your local parks?



Ooh, I'm liking #1 a lot - I'd considered volunteering, but hadn't connected that with stress relief, thanks for the suggestion.

for #2 I think it's just a case of adjustment - my nearest big park is 30 minutes travel away, whereas I've spent most of 23 years with about 800 square miles of national park the other side of a gate at the top of my street. It's just a case of getting used to having to actually plan a trip when I want to get out into nature, rather than just being able to step out whenever I feel like it. I've just been for a walk now - and the streets are actually pretty deserted on a rainy Sunday evening, so I can get a bit of the sense of isolation I was craving.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Sun Oct 12, 2014 7:10 pm UTC

Well even when living in the countryside, most people have to drive before getting into a really wild place.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Sun Oct 12, 2014 8:25 pm UTC

Grop wrote:Well even when living in the countryside, most people have to drive before getting into a really wild place.


Yes, I realise that I grew up in quite an unusual and privileged situation. However, I developed pretty much all of my coping mechanisms in that situation, and so came to rely on it, hence the question about new coping mechanisms. I never really realised it before (I've lived in the city for two years) but I've not had a great day today and I suddenly had a very strong urge to go tramping up a mountain and then come back and do violence unto logs. Luckily, walking for an hour through deserted streets in the rain, listening to Joy Division* proved to be an acceptable alternative.

* God, I sound like a moping teenager when I put that in writing.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Sun Oct 12, 2014 8:43 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:
* God, I sound like a moping teenager when I put that in writing.

I think everyone is a moping teenager, sometimes.

It seems you are a responsible self aware moping teenager.
Has the teenager within 'mellowed' or is that how you always were?

I read a Birthday essay written by an eleven year old.
It was a tradition with That family.

Each birthday came with both Rights and Responsibilities.
To write something was a Responsibility.

The subject was: What does it feel like to be Eleven?
The essay stated in very clear language.

It feels, just, like 7, 6 and 4 did.
Inside I am every age I have every been.

Now; I am eleven.
I feel eleven and four.

I understand the City Blues.
I am not a City person.

I lived in a City.
It was a Slice of Hell.

It sounds like you are coping better than I did.
Good You!

You are an Example that it Can be done.
I may be an Example of, 'It can't be done by, just, anyone.'
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Sun Oct 12, 2014 8:51 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:[*] Chopping firewood with a splitting maul. The key points here are that the activity should be physically exhausting, have a rhythm to it and actually accomplish something externally useful (otherwise lifting weights would work, and it doesn't).
Maybe try getting a heavy bag or a speed bag (or both). Keeping a speed bag going definitely requires rhythm, and can be pretty exhausting. This is the routine I use on my heavy bag, it's less rhythmic, though some parts require rhythm, but it's definitely exhausting. And the practical benefit is exercise.

http://youtu.be/-YuOvQ6DzGs
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Sun Oct 12, 2014 8:54 pm UTC

addams wrote:
Quercus wrote:
* God, I sound like a moping teenager when I put that in writing.

I think everyone is a moping teenager, sometimes.

It seems you are a responsible self aware moping teenager.
Has the teenager within 'mellowed' or is that how you always were?


Nope, I was a happy, well adjusted teenager, and I seem to be becoming more moody and rebellious as I age!

addams wrote:
Quercus wrote:
* God, I sound like a moping teenager when I put that in writing.

I think everyone is a moping teenager, sometimes.

It seems you are a responsible self aware moping teenager.
Has the teenager within 'mellowed' or is that how you always were?


Nope, I was a happy, well adjusted teenager, and I seem to be becoming more moody and rebellious as I age!

SurgicalSteel wrote:
Quercus wrote:[*] Chopping firewood with a splitting maul. The key points here are that the activity should be physically exhausting, have a rhythm to it and actually accomplish something externally useful (otherwise lifting weights would work, and it doesn't).
Maybe try getting a heavy bag or a speed bag (or both). Keeping a speed bag going definitely requires rhythm, and can be pretty exhausting. This is the routine I use on my heavy bag, it's less rhythmic, though some parts require rhythm, but it's definitely exhausting. And the practical benefit is exercise.

http://youtu.be/-YuOvQ6DzGs


That's not a bad idea (at least the speed bag - I can't think where I'd put a heavy bag in my place), especially as my arm strength is currently terrible and I've been looking for fun ways to work on this. However it sounds like something that would need training in order to do it without injury - is it something that's possible to pick up on your own, or do you really need to go to a gym and get someone to show you how to do it?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Sun Oct 12, 2014 10:47 pm UTC

I have done my share of chopping wood.
It is a Workout.

It is also very satisfying.
Each piece must be evaluated.
Then HIT!

It is a skill.
You must have learned it from someone.
Over time, you must have gotten good.

I've done it.
It's fun.

It is said, "Firewood warms us twice."
Once while we are chopping and once while we are burning it.

I think firewood warms me more than twice.
1. Into the woods to get that stuff.
2. Unload it.
3. Chop it.
4. Bring it in and set it on fire.
5. Warm....relaxing fire to dose by.

I have tried the Beat Bags.
It may be the the thing for you.

It was not the Thing for me.
It was, sort of, boring.

Oh! I do like hitting a beat bag with a stick.
It's, sort of, like chopping wood.

again, I get bored and want to hit something more interesting.

I think it takes training to hit a beat bag.
If you are associated with a University,
They might have a guy that will stand there and tell you when you get it right and what you did wrong.

I hung out with that guy.
It was a Class.

P.E. can be really hard.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Mon Oct 13, 2014 12:05 am UTC

Quercus wrote:However it sounds like something that would need training in order to do it without injury - is it something that's possible to pick up on your own, or do you really need to go to a gym and get someone to show you how to do it?
I'm sure training wouldn't hurt, but if you're thoughtful and pay attention to what you're doing when you're starting out, you should be fine. If you're going to get a heavy bag, look up things like how to wrap your hands, and how to safely throw a punch (the gist is that you don't want your wrists to be forced to bend). Don't start out throwing full power punches, start slow until you get a feel for how your arms and body move when you punch, and are able to make solid connections that don't cause your wrists to flex. From there you can ratchet up the power. Same thing with kicks, figure out how your body works, and what changes you have to make to make it work safely, and go from there. There's no reason to not start slow until you get good technique and form down.

Speed bags are even easier. You can get some kickboxing gloves if you want, but I'd say they're not strictly necessary, it'll just make your hands a little less chafed. Speed bags are much lighter, and you generally don't hit them with full power, so you're a lot less likely to injure yourself. It's still a good idea to start slow here, but not because you might hurt yourself, more so that you can get a feel for how your bag moves and reacts to hits of varying power. Once you know that you can figure out the timing and rhythm you will need to keep the bag going. My favorite rhythm is a RRLL pattern, letting the bag hit the rebound plate three times between each hit.

http://youtu.be/Ufjv2rp81-U?t=4m27s

There's good resources online, and as long as you're smart about it, you won't get hurt by bad advice. If you try something and it doesn't feel right, or it hurts or causes twisting or pulling, stop. You might be doing it wrong, or you might be getting bad advice. See if other resources agree with the advice that's causing the pain, if so, you're probably doing it wrong. Find other tutorials talking about the same technique to try to see what you're doing or interpreting wrong. Take it slow, focus on technique, stop if you're injured, and you'll be fine.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:03 am UTC

So funny.
It's good advice, but still ...funny.

Pt. "It hurts when I do This."
Dr. "Don't do That."
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Mon Oct 13, 2014 4:13 am UTC

You'd be surprised how many preventable injuries are caused by that stupid mantra "pain is weakness leaving the body." Proper exercise and stretching doesn't hurt, it's strenuous and exhausting, but it doesn't hurt.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Mon Oct 13, 2014 8:34 am UTC

SurgicalSteel wrote: There's good resources online, and as long as you're smart about it, you won't get hurt by bad advice. If you try something and it doesn't feel right, or it hurts or causes twisting or pulling, stop. You might be doing it wrong, or you might be getting bad advice. See if other resources agree with the advice that's causing the pain, if so, you're probably doing it wrong. Find other tutorials talking about the same technique to try to see what you're doing or interpreting wrong. Take it slow, focus on technique, stop if you're injured, and you'll be fine.


Okay, that's great, thanks. It's pretty similar to running then in terms of how to approach it (I've recently taken up running).

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby setzer777 » Thu Oct 16, 2014 6:03 pm UTC

Utterly random, but to anyone who knows anything about Chinese or Japanese kanji: is there a way to indicate that a word is being stretched out by the speaker? Like: "That took a looooooong time"?
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Mon Oct 20, 2014 11:41 pm UTC

setzer777 wrote:Utterly random, but to anyone who knows anything about Chinese or Japanese kanji: is there a way to indicate that a word is being stretched out by the speaker? Like: "That took a looooooong time"?

Not kanji, but for things written in Japanese text you can use a squiggly line, which when writing Western-style (i.e. left-to-right, top-to-bottom) looks like an elongated tilde. So, for example, "zuuto zuu~to!"
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Mon Oct 27, 2014 5:13 am UTC

If you ever get tickets for a rock concert in Korea, you'll have a ticket number. Entrance to the gig is strictly in numerical order; turning up early has no benefit. This floored me the first time I went to a show here. It was a smallish venue, and it still took them about an hour to get everyone in, because they did it in batches of ten by ticket number. In the UK, you queue up outside the venue, and are admitted in the order you arrived (Brits do love to queue). I've never been to a concert (without assigned seats) in any other country - so what's the norm in the rest of the world? Is Korea unusual, or the UK, or neither/both?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Diadem » Mon Oct 27, 2014 7:33 am UTC

Over here (Netherlands) for big concerts etc it is 'first come first serve'. You are allowed in in the order you arrive, which means that if you want the best places you have to show up early. This is for concerts and venues where you stand. If there are seats, they are generally numbered, and tickets are sold for specific seats. So it doesn't matter when you arrive, nor when you buy the ticket (though the most popular seats will probably be sold first of course).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby SecondTalon » Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:22 pm UTC

Adacore wrote:If you ever get tickets for a rock concert in Korea, you'll have a ticket number. Entrance to the gig is strictly in numerical order; turning up early has no benefit. This floored me the first time I went to a show here. It was a smallish venue, and it still took them about an hour to get everyone in, because they did it in batches of ten by ticket number. In the UK, you queue up outside the venue, and are admitted in the order you arrived (Brits do love to queue). I've never been to a concert (without assigned seats) in any other country - so what's the norm in the rest of the world? Is Korea unusual, or the UK, or neither/both?


All the concerts I've been to have been either entirely General Admission, entirely Seated, or a mix of GA and Seating. I've been to shows in arenas that seat tens of thousands and I've been to shows (I'm thinking specifically of ...crap, it was either one of Dinosaur Jr's last shows, or J Mascis + The Fog's first shows...) in places that could, in that configuration, hold 150. And I've been to a handful of orchestral things as well, so I'm going to generalize across all of them.

If you have a seat - you show up whenever (doors usually open in advance, how in advance depends on the number of people and the type of show, but let's go with roughly two hours as an average) and take your place because it's yours.

If it's GA, you show up whenever and muscle your way to where you want to be. Some shows that are GA only and in bars, if you wanted a table, just find an empty one and take it. The more traditional Rock Venue sort of thing usually has GA in front of the stage and seating circling GA. Though I did go to one place where seating was in front of the stage and GA was around it - that was strange, as GA is what you get if you're wanting to dance or mosh or whatever is appropriate and while it was the sort of show appropriate for that, being so far from the stage killed the dancing mood.

As far as getting through the actual doors goes - there's usually a line for Will Call (that is, if you ordered your tickets but don't have them, you pick them up from Will Call - don't ask about the name, that's completely unrelated), a line for last minute ticket sales if there are any tickets left, and then a line to get in. Once you're past the ticket-taker, it's usually a free-for-all in moving about the place. There will be rough lines at concession areas and souvenir stands, but how nicely those lines are followed is going to depend on a number of factors too complex to get in to, but the basic gist is - the rougher the act and the rougher the venue, the less likely lines will be strictly followed.

Moving from the starting area to where you need to be may involve another person checking tickets to make sure you get to the right place, if it's doing a split seating/GA arrangement.

And that's pretty much it. Orderly queuing is sporadic, and there's certainly never been an occasion of "Sir, your ticket is #365 and we're only on #50, so we need you to wait for the other 300 people to get through first".... unless the person then went on to laugh for 20 minutes while waving me through and I forgot their joke.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby PolakoVoador » Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:33 pm UTC

In Brazil, if it isn't an event with numbered seats, first come-first served it is, so expect queues for any reasonably sized gig. This arrangement is valid even for football matches, most of which have a mixed system of GA and numbered seats.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby roband » Fri Nov 07, 2014 4:25 pm UTC

Germans out there, how common are email addresses using German TLDs?
What are the most common ones used?

Or do you tend to use GMail/Hotmail/Live etc. like the rest of the world?

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bachaddict » Thu Nov 13, 2014 8:45 am UTC

roband wrote:Germans out there, how common are email addresses using German TLDs?
What are the most common ones used?

Or do you tend to use GMail/Hotmail/Live etc. like the rest of the world?

Even though I don't email a lot of Germans, I'd assume any company with a website will have email addresses of 'benutzer@beispiel.de'. I don't know if Yahoo provides @yahoo.de addresses, but @gmx.de is (was?) pretty common.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:42 pm UTC

The Stolen Road Sign.
Do you have a Stolen Road Sign?

Why not?
They don’t have to be Stolen.
They, just, look that way.

Some are purchased in a store with Cash or Card.
Some are Found.
Some are a valued part of our Inheritances.

Some are procured Honestly.
We have gone Full Circle.
Honest Procurement of a Stolen Road Sign requires it to be Stolen.

Is it an American Only behavior?
Is there a Class Divide between people with Stolen Road Signs and people that do not have Stolen Road Signs?

How can that be?
We are all Human.

Humans are Scavengers with an Eye for the Novel, the Meaningful, the Forbidden.
Stolen Road Signs are not all that Forbidden.

Some are so Novel they need to be replaced, often.
Small price to pay for a HollyWood and Vine sign.

There is a Punishment of some kind for people that get caught.

The Police take your sign.
Then they have HollyWood and Vine.

Don’t get caught.
Inherit it.

Buy one.
It’s cheeper than a ticket to California.

Do you have a Stolen Road Sign?
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Neil_Boekend
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Neil_Boekend » Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:05 pm UTC

Not since my time as a student. Once we cleaned in a student house and we found a closet with approx 20 road signs. Left by the previous batch of students.
A friend of mine had one as the surface of his coffee table.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Fri Nov 14, 2014 5:02 pm UTC

Neil_Boekend wrote:Not since my time as a student. Once we cleaned in a student house and we found a closet with approx 20 road signs. Left by the previous batch of students.
A friend of mine had one as the surface of his coffee table.

Yep.
That's the way they get distributed, sometimes.

What a great Coffee Table.
Did he or she outgrow it?

If so; That's a darned shame.
Do you remember what Sign that coffee table was made from?

Was it a Yield?

EDIT:
What triggered the question was a Road Sign that fell in my lap.
It is Sooo funny.

It says, Storm Damage
It blew away in a storm.

How funny is that?
A sign that warns of what happened to it.

Storm Damage:
An ever present Threat.

Or; A good description.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby You, sir, name? » Fri Nov 14, 2014 5:13 pm UTC

Do bigger European cities exist where the housing market isn't a complete mess? (My reference is Stockholm)
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Fri Nov 14, 2014 5:55 pm UTC

Finding an appartment in Paris doesn't seem difficult, as long as you can afford the rent.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby RollingHead » Sun Nov 16, 2014 8:08 pm UTC

addams wrote:The Stolen Road Sign.

It's pretty common for people in their late teens / early 20s to steal signs, especially if they're students who live with other students instead of their families. I remember some friends and I taking one during a drunken stroll but I don't have it, I forget which one of us took it home. There are facebook pages like this one (questionable furniture of university students) which feature a lot of road signs proudly displayed in crappy student apartments.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Sun Nov 16, 2014 10:08 pm UTC

That link was Food for Thought.

What is Going On! with those people?
Students?? Students of What??

Then,... it slowly began to dawn on me.....
Those students may be darned good at being students.

They are experts at going to school, studying and passing exams.
That group of people may have never had to decide what goes Into the refrigerator
and what stays out of the refrigerator before in their Whole Lives.

As young adults they have to figure out how clothes get clean, what is Art, why Art, why not That Art.
They rush full steam ahead, absolutely in Love with the strangest things.

They do somethings exactly like Mom did.
They do somethings because Mom would NEVER.
(little do they know; Mom did.)

They learn to Love and Laugh at themselves and each other.
What a strange Phase. Some people Never outgrow it.

I Loved the photo of The Cat in the Refrigerator.
Mom said, "Never put the Cat in the Refrigerator"

So; They keep a photo of the Family Cat, in the Refrigerator.
It makes perfect sense to me.

That entire group may have a Cat in the Refrigerator for the rest of their Natural Lives.

Those students are studying how to be People.
How much guidance do they get?

Guidance Only from each other?
....No wonder they drink.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Tue Nov 25, 2014 3:13 am UTC

I have a Question.
I'd like to know what Europeans and Others think.

If a person was Down, either dead or alive, on a City Street in your Nation.
How long before Emergency Medical Arrived? Would your people send a Hearse?

There is something very primal about our treatment of The Dead.
When and where I went to school, The Dead received TLC, much the same as The Living.

How does your Nation address public death?
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Tue Nov 25, 2014 9:29 am UTC

addams wrote:If a person was Down, either dead or alive, on a City Street in your Nation.
How long before Emergency Medical Arrived? Would your people send a Hearse?


Here I am pretty sure emergency medics would be called and come pretty quick, then take the person to a hospital. I never heard of emergency hearses.

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Re: Questions For The World

Postby bachaddict » Tue Nov 25, 2014 11:24 am UTC

If someone is very dead, they are covered and the area cordoned off for investigation.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby NieXS » Wed Nov 26, 2014 12:45 pm UTC

I have a question regarding public sector employment.

How are public servants hired in your country? Do they go through the standard private-sector style resumé submission followed by interviews?

Here in Brazil, the government and state-run companies hire through public examinations; they generally consist of multiple-choice tests, with additional tests for things like physical fitness and hearing for certain jobs, like police officers.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Nov 26, 2014 5:49 pm UTC

In America, I'm pretty sure it's more or less just like a private employment interview, meaning that it can vary widely from one agency to another, and different requirements may apply either from different agencies' own internal rules, or various acts of legislation passed about the matter. AFAIK there is no general-purpose "so you want a job in the public sector?" process. (Never mind that there are multiple overlapping governments each of which is a different kind of "public sector". Every state is its own sovereign entity, to the point that some states are still individually called their own Republics or Commonwealths. The Federal government is a different entity entirely; the states are not just subdivisions of it. And city governments are not just subdivisions of the state government either, but bear a relationship more like a corporation does to it: they are chartered and authorized and regulated by it, but after incorporation they are their own thing. Municipal, state, and federal police agencies, legislatures, courts, etc, are all completely separate systems).
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby ConMan » Wed Nov 26, 2014 10:05 pm UTC

NieXS wrote:I have a question regarding public sector employment.

How are public servants hired in your country? Do they go through the standard private-sector style resumé submission followed by interviews?

Here in Brazil, the government and state-run companies hire through public examinations; they generally consist of multiple-choice tests, with additional tests for things like physical fitness and hearing for certain jobs, like police officers.

In Australia, the federal public service does have some level of standardisation, but there isn't a single "public sector recruitment" process. The levels are mostly standard (starting with the APS1-6, then the EL1-2, and going up from there) and there's a published list of selection criteria for each level across the service, although the pay varies between agencies. A typical recruitment round varies slightly depending on whether it's a single open position or a more general hiring, but the process is still mostly the same - submit a resume and a document addressing the specific selection criteria for the position, then if you're found suitable based on those you'll get called up for an interview, they might contact your referees for more details, then 6-12 months later they might finally decide on whether to hire you.
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Re: Questions For The World

Postby Clix » Wed Nov 26, 2014 11:16 pm UTC

NieXS wrote:I have a question regarding public sector employment.

How are public servants hired in your country? Do they go through the standard private-sector style resumé submission followed by interviews?

...<snip>.


In the U.S. it all depends on which governmental agency and / or location and /or job you're applying for. In the state I grew up in and held my first government job (State level) it was all done by taking a "Civil Service Test" . The hiring authority had to interview the top three and then could choose one of them. Where I am now (County level, different State) it was done via the application/resume/interview process. Neither system is perfect, but then again what is?
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