Questions For The World

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Thu Feb 05, 2015 4:54 pm UTC

Shro wrote:
Quercus wrote:Okay, interesting, where is the wet/damp transition point for hair? I've been calling my hair damp in its "after being rubbed with a towel" state, but I'm getting the feeling that might still be "wet" - is damp "almost dry but not quite"? If so, I'm not managing to get it that far with a towel.

This is very hard to know without knowing the texture of your hair. Finer hair can become almost dry after being rubbed with a towel, while thick hair can remain so for a long time. If I go to bed with wet hair, my underside of my hair can still occasionally remain damp when I wake up. It might be easier to think about it in the other direction... damp hair is dry hair after squirted a few time with some water.


Great, got it. I think in that case I do need a hair-dryer to get my hair to "damp" in a reasonable time-scale. Thanks again :D

Update: I tried the hair-dryer till just damp, hair product then hair spray routine today, and my hair stayed more or less how I wanted it all day. It was still a bit flat by the end of the day, but about 100x better than it was. I think a little more hair spray next time and it should be perfect.

User avatar
Kewangji
Has Been Touched
Posts: 2203
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 5:20 pm UTC
Location: Lost in Translation
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Kewangji » Sat Feb 07, 2015 12:37 am UTC

Do you store your ketchup in the fridge or not? In Sweden (and the rest of the Nordic countries, if I'm to believe what the back of the ketchup bottle says) we store ketchup bottles in fridges, though I know when I lived in England no-one stored their ketchup in fridges, and I know that restaurants have ketchup out day and night on tables and it never goes bad (even in places where no-one actually uses ketchup on their food). What is the deal with this? Why would the ketchup bottle tell me to store it in the fridge if it wasn't necessary? So many questions.
If you like my words sign up for my newsletter, Airport Tattoo Parlour: https://tinyletter.com/distantstations

The Great Hippo wrote:Nuclear bombs are like potato chips, you can't stop after just *one*

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Sat Feb 07, 2015 1:02 am UTC

UK here, I keep my ketchup in the fridge. But then, I also keep my bread in the freezer, so maybe I'm not the best person to ask.

What I'm not so sure about is eggs. The supermarkets here leave them sitting out on unrefrigerated shelves, which I take to mean they'd be safe to store in a cupboard, but I'm not keen on doing that. I mean, why else would my fridge come with little egg holders in the door if that's not where you're meant to store them??

User avatar
Kewangji
Has Been Touched
Posts: 2203
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 5:20 pm UTC
Location: Lost in Translation
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Kewangji » Sat Feb 07, 2015 1:05 am UTC

Knowledge that I've amassed from Sweden and the UK: Eggs last for fucking ever if you keep them in the fridge. If you keep them out of the fridge it's a hazard game and, at least during summer, you have to actually be aware of the dates on the package. If you need to be sure an egg is not off, put it in water. If it floats, it's a witch and you need to burn it. If it just sort of dances at the bottom of the bowl/glass/canister, it's fine.
If you like my words sign up for my newsletter, Airport Tattoo Parlour: https://tinyletter.com/distantstations

The Great Hippo wrote:Nuclear bombs are like potato chips, you can't stop after just *one*

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Sat Feb 07, 2015 1:07 am UTC

...aaaand I've found my first signature. Thank you.

Edit: Google tells me that the reason this test works is because water or gas or something escapes through the shell, thus making the egg lighter. By the time it's lost enough to float, it's gone off. Interesting. This porous nature of the shell explains why those year-old eggs I kept forgetting to throw out never exploded.
Last edited by Oraiste on Sat Feb 07, 2015 2:38 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
New User
Posts: 570
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:40 am UTC
Location: USA

Re: Questions For The World

Postby New User » Sat Feb 07, 2015 1:56 am UTC

I have heard that storing eggs in the refrigerator is mainly something done in the USA. That's because egg manufacturers (farmers) wash the eggs thoroughly. After a hen lays an egg, it is supposedly coated in natural layer or membrane of... slime or something, I don't know. If the eggs aren't washed, they can be kept at room temperature for a while without spoiling. The natural membrane is washed away when the eggs are cleaned, so they need to be refrigerated or they will quickly spoil.

I have heard this from more than one source, and this is one of them.

User avatar
bentheimmigrant
Dotcor Good Poster
Posts: 1353
Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:01 pm UTC
Location: UK

Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Sat Feb 07, 2015 8:31 am UTC

Kewangji wrote:Do you store your ketchup in the fridge or not? In Sweden (and the rest of the Nordic countries, if I'm to believe what the back of the ketchup bottle says) we store ketchup bottles in fridges, though I know when I lived in England no-one stored their ketchup in fridges, and I know that restaurants have ketchup out day and night on tables and it never goes bad (even in places where no-one actually uses ketchup on their food). What is the deal with this? Why would the ketchup bottle tell me to store it in the fridge if it wasn't necessary? So many questions.

I store it in the fridge, but yeah, it won't go off out of it. I just prefer cold ketchup. It's thicker, and I like the extra cold on hot food.
"Comment is free, but facts are sacred" - C.P. Scott

User avatar
Grop
Posts: 1837
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Grop » Sat Feb 07, 2015 9:33 am UTC

I store my eggs in the fridge as well. When some eggs reach the date printed on them, I hard-boil them (and then I consider they will last forever).

User avatar
Giant Speck
Bouncy Sex Marshmallow
Posts: 3795
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:30 pm UTC
Location: Tucson, Arizona

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Giant Speck » Sat Feb 07, 2015 4:15 pm UTC

I always store eggs in the fridge and ketchup; however, the latter I wouldn't freak out so much if I accidentally left it out on the counter all day. I never put bread in the refrigerator; it spoils more quickly that way.
"Did I say recently that I love Giant Speck? Because I love Giant Speck. He is the best." - Weeks

User avatar
e^iπ+1=0
Much, much better than Gooder
Posts: 2061
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:41 am UTC
Location: Chicago-ish

Re: Questions For The World

Postby e^iπ+1=0 » Sat Feb 07, 2015 4:27 pm UTC

You store your eggs in ketchup? :P

In any case, I rarely buy eggs, but I keep them in the fridge when I do. Ketchup I don't; I dislike cold ketchup. Bread I find keeps longer in the fridge. *shrugs*
poxic wrote:You, sir, have heroic hair.
poxic wrote:I note that the hair is not slowing down. It appears to have progressed from heroic to rocking.

(Avatar by Sungura)

User avatar
Apparently Anonymous
Posts: 438
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 4:17 pm UTC
Location: The blogosphere

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Apparently Anonymous » Sat Feb 07, 2015 5:01 pm UTC

I keep ketchup in the fridge and eggs at room temperature, actually.

I used to store eggs in the fridge as well, that's what we did at home (in Norway), but after coming to Austria and noticing that in some grocery stores they're kept non-refridgerated, I kind of stopped doing that. It's also practical for cooking (since you'll generally want eggs to be room temperature when you start cooking), or when I want to boil eggs (they crack less easily when they're not cold).

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Sat Feb 07, 2015 5:26 pm UTC

Giant Speck wrote:I never put bread in the refrigerator; it spoils more quickly that way.

Lasts forever in the freezer, though. Old freezer bread tends to be of a lower quality than fresh or recently-frozen bread, but it's still soft and edible.

(...after thawing. It's not so soft straight from the freezer.)

User avatar
Giant Speck
Bouncy Sex Marshmallow
Posts: 3795
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:30 pm UTC
Location: Tucson, Arizona

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Giant Speck » Sat Feb 07, 2015 5:32 pm UTC

Oh, true. My parents would load up on bread at the grocery store and store it in the freezer.
"Did I say recently that I love Giant Speck? Because I love Giant Speck. He is the best." - Weeks

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Sat Feb 07, 2015 5:54 pm UTC

I don't eat bread often enough to use up even a small loaf before it goes stale, so I always slice my bread, freeze it, then defrost individual slices in the toaster as required.

User avatar
bentheimmigrant
Dotcor Good Poster
Posts: 1353
Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:01 pm UTC
Location: UK

Re: Questions For The World

Postby bentheimmigrant » Sat Feb 07, 2015 6:07 pm UTC

http://io9.com/americans-why-do-you-kee ... 1465309529

A pretty good summary of the egg thing. I don't think it mentioned the other reason I've heard, which is that the porous egg shell picks up food smells, which there are more of in a fridge.

Also, we keep eggs on the counter, I've not seen any go off before the sell by date.
"Comment is free, but facts are sacred" - C.P. Scott

User avatar
addams
Posts: 9387
Joined: Sun Sep 12, 2010 4:44 am UTC
Location: Gold Beach, OR; 97444

Re: Questions For The World

Postby addams » Sat Feb 07, 2015 9:56 pm UTC

Well...That explains it.

The constant temp thing is only a problem going from cold to warm.
Cooling a European egg, should be fine. Then eat the stupid thing.

I used washed US eggs to make Rotten Eggs.
It worked.

Long Egg Post made shorter by Spoiler.
Spoiler:
Those become some delicate fucking eggs.
A quick increase in temp. or a little bump will cause the nasty, foul smelling things to Blow.

Clumsiness washes off a person.
Be dammed careful during Transport.

It would come out of a Car, I suppose.
That's something I do not want to test.

What?
You don't make Rotten Eggs?

The recipe is easy.
1. Line a basket with a Kitchen Towel or Small Table Cloth.
2. Put eggs into basket.

3. Set in a place that gets a little sun.
4. Wait six weeks.

It's ok to uncover them.
When done properly, that basket takes on a mild sulfur smell.

Transport is Risky Business.
In my experience, not every egg behaves the same.
Each one is a little different.

That's one of the things that makes it fun.
Some explode in Air.
Some explode in Hand.
Some explode on Contact.
Some don't explode.

Even the ones that don't explode are eggs and they break leaving....evidence of egg.
Eggs come in a handy to throw size and shape. That's handy.

Convenient is the word for that, I think.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Sat Feb 07, 2015 9:59 pm UTC

addams wrote:That's one of the things that makes it fun.
Some explode in Air.
Some explode in Hand.
Some explode on Contact.
Some don't explode.

Oh. I guess I just got lucky with mine, then.

User avatar
Neil_Boekend
Posts: 3215
Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2013 6:35 am UTC
Location: Yes.

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Neil_Boekend » Sat Feb 07, 2015 10:31 pm UTC

I keep my eggs in the back of the fridge. There the temperature is rather stable. The holder in the door should never be used as the temperature varies too much there.
Where I live the farmers do not wash eggs and the supermarkets keep eggs unrefrigerated.
Mikeski wrote:A "What If" update is never late. Nor is it early. It is posted precisely when it should be.

patzer's signature wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I'm being quoted too much!

he/him/his

User avatar
Apparently Anonymous
Posts: 438
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 4:17 pm UTC
Location: The blogosphere

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Apparently Anonymous » Mon Feb 09, 2015 3:13 pm UTC

Kewangji wrote: and I know that restaurants have ketchup out day and night on tables and it never goes bad (even in places where no-one actually uses ketchup on their food).


Oh, I just remembered - at the café where I work in summer, we do put the ketchup and mustard into the fridge at night, but no one ever checks the expiration date. As a result of this, I have on several occasion found bottles of ketchup and/or mustard that expired 5-6 months back. No one has ever complained, though, so it seems it was fine. As a result of this, I have come to the belief that ketchup never ever goes bad.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Mon Feb 09, 2015 3:25 pm UTC

Apparently Anonymous wrote:
Kewangji wrote: and I know that restaurants have ketchup out day and night on tables and it never goes bad (even in places where no-one actually uses ketchup on their food).


Oh, I just remembered - at the café where I work in summer, we do put the ketchup and mustard into the fridge at night, but no one ever checks the expiration date. As a result of this, I have on several occasion found bottles of ketchup and/or mustard that expired 5-6 months back. No one has ever complained, though, so it seems it was fine. As a result of this, I have come to the belief that ketchup never ever goes bad.


I've eaten ketchup two years after it expired - it was fine. I did however once find a bottle of tabasco sauce that was so far past its expiry date (we're talking over a decade here) that it had turned grey and completely lost its spiciness (I was told this, I didn't taste it myself).

User avatar
mathmannix
Posts: 1401
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 2:12 pm UTC
Location: Washington, DC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby mathmannix » Mon Feb 09, 2015 4:12 pm UTC

Apparently Anonymous wrote:
Kewangji wrote: and I know that restaurants have ketchup out day and night on tables and it never goes bad (even in places where no-one actually uses ketchup on their food).


Oh, I just remembered - at the café where I work in summer, we do put the ketchup and mustard into the fridge at night, but no one ever checks the expiration date. As a result of this, I have on several occasion found bottles of ketchup and/or mustard that expired 5-6 months back. No one has ever complained, though, so it seems it was fine. As a result of this, I have come to the belief that ketchup never ever goes bad.

I always thought the real risk with ketchup bottles in restaurants was that the workers mate them at the end of the day, to end up with full bottles on each table, and thus destroy any truth on the expiration dates.
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Mon Feb 09, 2015 4:40 pm UTC

The thing with expiration dates is they don't really mean "our product will become inedible after this date" so much as "we can't guarantee this product will remain sufficiently fresh for more than [period], so we're sticking this date on the label to avoid lawsuits". In the case of highly perishable products like milk, then yeah, the printed date is going to be damn close to its actual shelf life, but longer-lasting products can still be good for months or potentially years after the label claims they've gone off. It obviously depends on the product, though.

Oh, and if you think mating ketchup bottles is bad, what about Dyer's Burgers? The grease they're cooked in is mated with yesterday's strained leftovers, and they've been making them for a hundred years.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:08 pm UTC

Oraiste wrote:The thing with expiration dates is they don't really mean "our product will become inedible after this date" so much as "we can't guarantee this product will remain sufficiently fresh for more than [period], so we're sticking this date on the label to avoid lawsuits". In the case of highly perishable products like milk, then yeah, the printed date is going to be damn close to its actual shelf life, but longer-lasting products can still be good for months or potentially years after the label claims they've gone off. It obviously depends on the product, though.


Well said. I don't know if it is the case in the US, but in the UK we have two types of expiration date:

  • "use by" dates, which mean "we can't be sure this product will be safe after this date", that's used for things like eggs, milk and meat that actually has a poisoning risk if eaten past their best.
  • "best before" dates, which mean "we can't be sure this product will be pleasant after this date.

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:19 pm UTC

I've seen "best before" dates labelled as "display until", like they're pleading with the supermarkets to help them maintain their reputations. "Hey, don't sell this to anyone after [date] cause it's not going to taste great and we don't want people to think our product sucks now, k?"

User avatar
eSOANEM
:D
Posts: 3571
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:39 pm UTC
Location: Grantabrycge

Re: Questions For The World

Postby eSOANEM » Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:28 pm UTC

I think that's still overstating them, it's not so much "we aren't sure" as "we don't think we can guarantee to a court's satisfaction". It doesn't so much give you the expected date after which it will have gone off so much as 2 standard deviations (or some other confidence level) before that meaning that food will, in almost all cases, not have gone off immediately after the use by date and, for most foods, is usually good for a couple of days.

Best before dates are pretty meaningless.
my pronouns are they

Magnanimous wrote:(fuck the macrons)

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Mon Feb 09, 2015 5:51 pm UTC

eSOANEM wrote:I think that's still overstating them, it's not so much "we aren't sure" as "we don't think we can guarantee to a court's satisfaction". It doesn't so much give you the expected date after which it will have gone off so much as 2 standard deviations (or some other confidence level) before that meaning that food will, in almost all cases, not have gone off immediately after the use by date and, for most foods, is usually good for a couple of days.

Best before dates are pretty meaningless.


That's true. I mainly trust my senses - if it looks okay, feels okay, smells okay and tastes okay (in that order) it usually is okay. I play it safe with meat, because I didn't eat meat (wasn't vegetarian because I did eat fish) for the first 21 years of my life and still don't have a good sense of what "okay" vs. "not-okay" is like with meat.

Oraiste wrote:I've seen "best before" dates labelled as "display until", like they're pleading with the supermarkets to help them maintain their reputations. "Hey, don't sell this to anyone after [date] cause it's not going to taste great and we don't want people to think our product sucks now, k?"


That's not quite the same thing - in the UK a product will have either a "best before" date or a "use by" date (never both). It may sometimes have a "display until" date in addition. The use by vs best before is entirely to tell the consumer whether it is a (low likelihood, as eSOANEM points out,) safety risk that is being warned about, or merely a palatability risk.

English really needs separate exclusive and non-exclusive "or"'s

Oraiste

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Oraiste » Mon Feb 09, 2015 6:10 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:
Oraiste wrote:I've seen "best before" dates labelled as "display until", like they're pleading with the supermarkets to help them maintain their reputations. "Hey, don't sell this to anyone after [date] cause it's not going to taste great and we don't want people to think our product sucks now, k?"


That's not quite the same thing - in the UK a product will have either a "best before" date or a "use by" date (never both). It may sometimes have a "display until" date in addition. The use by vs best before is entirely to tell the consumer whether it is a (low likelihood, as eSOANEM points out,) safety risk that is being warned about, or merely a palatability risk.

...huh. I live in the UK and I never noticed that. I mean, I understood the difference between "best before" and "use by", but I never realised "display until" wasn't interchangeable with "best before". Shows how much attention I pay.

Edit: I just checked my eggs and they have a "display until" and a "best before". Uh. I'd have thought eggs would be a "use by" sort of product. I've also got a bottle of soy sauce that says "END [date]", which is amusingly melodramatic.
Last edited by Oraiste on Mon Feb 09, 2015 6:50 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Mon Feb 09, 2015 6:42 pm UTC

Oraiste wrote:
Quercus wrote:
Oraiste wrote:I've seen "best before" dates labelled as "display until", like they're pleading with the supermarkets to help them maintain their reputations. "Hey, don't sell this to anyone after [date] cause it's not going to taste great and we don't want people to think our product sucks now, k?"


That's not quite the same thing - in the UK a product will have either a "best before" date or a "use by" date (never both). It may sometimes have a "display until" date in addition. The use by vs best before is entirely to tell the consumer whether it is a (low likelihood, as eSOANEM points out,) safety risk that is being warned about, or merely a palatability risk.

...huh. I live in the UK and I never noticed that. I mean, I understood the difference between "best before" and "use by", but I never realised "display until" wasn't interchangeable with "best before". Shows how much attention I pay.

Edit: I just checked my eggs and they have a "display until" and a "best before". Uh. I'd have thought eggs would be a "use by" sort of product. I've also got a bottle of soy sauce that says "END [date]", which is amusingly melodramatic.


Hmm, so would I (about the eggs), I generally just follow the float test with eggs anyway. That soy sauce is melodramatic, expecially since soy sauce is so salty that it surely wouldn't grow much in the way of microbes. The internet says soy sauce does deteriorate in quality after opening though.

I didn't notice about the best-before/use-by thing at all, until I heard it somewhere - I think it was on a Radio 4 programme about food waste.

User avatar
mathmannix
Posts: 1401
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 2:12 pm UTC
Location: Washington, DC

Re: Questions For The World

Postby mathmannix » Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:12 pm UTC

Huh. So, I just learned (from here and other sites) that the FDA does not require dates on foods in the US, except for infant formula, which is required federally to have a "Use-by" date. As far as nationwide regulations go, it's up to the manufacturer's discretion to include a date (and what type of date - "sell-by", "best-if-used-by", "packed on" for eggs, "baked on" for baked goods, etc.), and up to the store's discretion whether or not to sell it past that date. However, individual state regulations can be more rigorous, but that varies widely.
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

User avatar
Adacore
Posts: 2755
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:35 pm UTC
Location: 한국 창원

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Mon Feb 09, 2015 11:27 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:I did however once find a bottle of tabasco sauce that was so far past its expiry date (we're talking over a decade here) that it had turned grey and completely lost its spiciness (I was told this, I didn't taste it myself).

Tabasco is, I believe, light sensitive. That's why it's sold (at least in the UK) in a glass bottle inside a cardboard box. If you leave it somewhere exposed to the light, it will denature fairly rapidly (in a period of weeks) and turn grey and flavorless. Leave it in a dark cupboard, or just always return it to the box it was sold in when you're done adding it to your food, and it will last for a long time (years).

I see restaurants with bottles of Tabasco just sitting on the tables fairly often, which isn't great, but I guess most places that have it use it fast enough for it not to matter. I don't know if this also applies to other varieties of hot sauce.

User avatar
Giant Speck
Bouncy Sex Marshmallow
Posts: 3795
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:30 pm UTC
Location: Tucson, Arizona

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Giant Speck » Mon Feb 09, 2015 11:45 pm UTC

Huh. That partially explains why they include Tabasco in MREs. They aren't necessarily worried that it's going to spoil, because the vacuum-sealed package keeps it from being exposed to light.
"Did I say recently that I love Giant Speck? Because I love Giant Speck. He is the best." - Weeks

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Mon Feb 09, 2015 11:49 pm UTC

Giant Speck wrote:Huh. That partially explains why they include Tabasco in MREs. They aren't necessarily worried that it's going to spoil, because the vacuum-sealed package keeps it from being exposed to light.


Also, if anything can make crappy food palatable, Tabasco can.

User avatar
Shro
science genius girl
Posts: 2139
Joined: Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:31 am UTC
Location: im in ur heartz, stealin ur luv.
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Shro » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:24 am UTC

Tabasco is such a meh hot sauce. Your local Asian food mart probably has something a lot better.
argyl3: My idea of being a rebel is splitting infinitives.
Alisto: Rebel without a clause?

I made this thing:
www.justthetipcalculator.com

User avatar
SurgicalSteel
Posts: 1926
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:18 pm UTC
Location: DMV, USA

Re: Questions For The World

Postby SurgicalSteel » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:47 am UTC

I kind of want to sell a line of cheeses labelled with things like "Best before: a nice oakey Pinot Noir"

Shro wrote:Tabasco is such a meh hot sauce. Your local Asian food mart probably has something a lot better.
Even your Safeway or Target or Harris-Teeter should have Cholula (love the smoked Chipotle variety) or Rooster sauce. Always thought Tabasco was a bit too vinegary for me.
"There's spray paint on the teleprompter
Anchorman screams that he's seen a monster (mayday)
There's blood stains on his shirt (mayday)
They say that he's gone berserk."
--Flobots "Mayday"

User avatar
Pfhorrest
Posts: 3780
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:11 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Pfhorrest » Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:48 am UTC

I love Tabasco specifically for the vinegar bite. It's not just pure heat, it's got more interesting flavor. (I like varieties other than the plain red more though). Cholua is also great, especially garlic Cholua. But Sriracha ("rooster sauce"), meh. Tastes like mildly spiced ketchup to me.
Forrest Cameranesi, Geek of All Trades
"I am Sam. Sam I am. I do not like trolls, flames, or spam."
The Codex Quaerendae (my philosophy) - The Chronicles of Quelouva (my fiction)

User avatar
ahammel
My Little Cabbage
Posts: 2135
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:46 am UTC
Location: Vancouver BC
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby ahammel » Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:55 am UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:I love Tabasco specifically for the vinegar bite. It's not just pure heat, it's got more interesting flavor. (I like varieties other than the plain red more though). Cholua is also great, especially garlic Cholua. But Sriracha ("rooster sauce"), meh. Tastes like mildly spiced ketchup to me.

"Rooster sauce" also refers to sambal oelek, which is delicious.
He/Him/His/Alex
God damn these electric sex pants!

User avatar
Shro
science genius girl
Posts: 2139
Joined: Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:31 am UTC
Location: im in ur heartz, stealin ur luv.
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Shro » Tue Feb 10, 2015 3:17 am UTC

Three words: Maggi Garlic Chili.

Cholula is also the shit.

I've always wanted to get into a spice eating contest with some cocky dude. I'm sorry, but this petite Indian girl will kick your ass and make you cry. Because you ate to much spicy food. I hope you enjoy your cleared out sinuses.
argyl3: My idea of being a rebel is splitting infinitives.
Alisto: Rebel without a clause?

I made this thing:
www.justthetipcalculator.com

User avatar
Moo
Oh man! I'm going to be so rebellious! I'm gonna...
Posts: 6315
Joined: Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:15 pm UTC
Location: Beyond the goblin city
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Moo » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:22 am UTC

I used to have a bottle of tomato sauce (ketchup) in the fridge at work in the UK, and someone kept moving it to the cupboard, which really annoys me. I don't know about ketchup but the main brand of tomato sauce in South Africa is little more than a lot of tomatoes, vinegar and sugar, and as such can go sour easily if left out of the fridge. So I have a thing about it.

As a result I also worry about restaurants that leave it out (as they do even here in SA where I think most people put it in the fridge at home). I once put totally off tobasco all over a meal at an outdoor restaurant (so it had been sitting in the sun for who knows how long); I wasn't impressed.

I leave eggs out on the counter because I need the fridge space, I buy 24 at a time. Never had a problem but they're free range and not washed, I use them up quite quickly, and my kitchen is nice and cool.
Proverbs 9:7-8 wrote:Anyone who rebukes a mocker will get an insult in return. Anyone who corrects the wicked will get hurt. So don't bother correcting mockers; they will only hate you.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1548
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Quercus » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:52 am UTC

Shro wrote:I've always wanted to get into a spice eating contest with some cocky dude. I'm sorry, but this petite Indian girl will kick your ass and make you cry. Because you ate to much spicy food. I hope you enjoy your cleared out sinuses.

Against me, you've won already - yesterday I chopped up half a jalapeño with the seeds in to go on some salad, and that was already a bit much for me. I'm a spice wuss.

Moo wrote:I used to have a bottle of tomato sauce (ketchup) in the fridge at work in the UK, and someone kept moving it to the cupboard, which really annoys me. I don't know about ketchup but the main brand of tomato sauce in South Africa is little more than a lot of tomatoes, vinegar and sugar, and as such can go sour easily if left out of the fridge.


Hmm, those ingredients are pretty much the same as ketchup, but that never seems to go off - I've had an opened bottle of ketchup in my cupboard for about three months and it's fine. Maybe it's because I get the top-down squeezy bottles that probably reduce exposure to air (the layer of ketchup exposed to air in those bottles will be the last bit to be eaten, so might provide a buffer). It could also be because UK ketchup has a ridiculous amount of sugar in it.

User avatar
Adacore
Posts: 2755
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 12:35 pm UTC
Location: 한국 창원

Re: Questions For The World

Postby Adacore » Tue Feb 10, 2015 8:54 am UTC

Vinegar is normally a pretty good preservative, no? Ketchup is basically just pickled tomato, I'd think.


Return to “General”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 28 guests