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Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu May 17, 2018 8:07 pm UTC
by Sungura
Quercus wrote:Edit: Also grapes and grape products apparently, which I didn't know:

Grapes, raisins, sultanas, currants
Any quantity of these can be toxic. Cooking or baking doesn’t reduce the risk of poisoning.

Poisoning may initially result in vomiting and diarrhoea and subsequently in kidney failure (which may occur a few days after the initial effects).
Oh yeah, grapes/raisins/etc are WAYYYYY more toxic to dogs than chocolate.
Chocolate (really, the theobromine) if in small enough quantities usually the worst a dog will get is the shits (and, badly) so your biggest risk is dehydration but they tend to recover. So like if it was a Hershey bar, eh, Hershys is basically fake chocolate anyway there is very little theobromine. Americans call really shitty things chocolate!

OTOH, like, two grapes can kill a dog. Also watch apples that they don't get the core (seeds have cyanide and while not a ton, dogs are smaller and more easily affected!) but apple itself is fine.

Onions and garlic are also really bad for dogs.

Everyone hears about chocolate always, and while they shouldn't eat it, these other lesser spoken things tend to be far far worse. Perhaps in part due to because no one talks about it so no one pays attention to if their dog eats them?

Oh and in particular in herding breeds, MDRI mutation is a common drug resistant mutation that means ivermectin and other certain class drugs can easily kill. Knowledgable vets have trended away from ivermectin and other similar class drugs for dogs to 'be safe' as there are alternatives, but not all pay attention and there are times when ivermectin is the best option as well and they forget to think. But also your problem with herding breeds is cattle and livestock they herd, they can still be exposed and if they are MDRI, a little teeny exposure can be lethal (like, takes a chomp of cattle poo from one treated with ivermectin). I always recommend anyone who has a herding breed (BC, aussie, collies, mixes of, in particular) get the little test done if they dont know (easy cheap swab test kit you can send for on your own) because not all vets pay attention to what breed they are treating, and you should know!

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu May 17, 2018 8:29 pm UTC
by Zohar
I knew about onion and garlic (and chocolate), but never heard of grapes, thanks for the heads up!

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu May 17, 2018 9:32 pm UTC
by Grop
Unless foxes are tougher than dogs in that regard, that undermines the fable The Fox and the Grapes.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Sun May 20, 2018 8:52 pm UTC
by addams
Poor Stupid Lucy.
How that dog lived is a wonder.

Not that she didn't suffer from her dietary excesses.
She and I would Race to fallen fruit. She often won.

She was on a diet!
The vet would chastise me.

The vet expected me to control what that vacuum in a Dog Suit ate.
I loved that Ding-Dong, anyway.

She was funny.
She was the only Dog I ever knew who could Spit.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 2:58 pm UTC
by ObsessoMom
Any theories here about what might be causing this weathering pattern?

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2018/06/u ... ink-fence/

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 3:01 pm UTC
by Tyndmyr
I've seen paint contract due to exposure before, creating broken circle-like patterns. Not normally so many, or in such detail, but then, I don't generally look closely at weathered chain link fence. My guess is that heat/weathering created significant contraction, and so parts break, then eventually wear away.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 3:26 pm UTC
by trpmb6
This may have been asked before, but for you people that drive on the wrong side of the road: when passing oncoming people on a sidewalk, which way do you go? Most times here in the US when walking towards another person, that person will pass us on our left side - the same as with car traffic.

I noticed something like this when I was in the US, people tended to always walk on the right side of the pavement. So when I came back to England I watched people to see if we have such a definite idea of which side to walk on, we really don't, people just walk on either side of the pavement. It's strange that it is seemed to be so defined in the US and not so in the UK.
Does this fit with other people's experience? Do you always walk on the same side as you drive or does it differ?

Anyway I think people tend to step to the right in the UK (I came back and started trying to step to the left which wasn't very helpful).


I am so glad I was able to find this post from 2011. (I removed name tags so nobody got weird unwanted notifications from 7 years ago.)

I was just walking on our naturescape footpath outside our office building here and was wondering what people in the UK did while walking. Here in the US (as emceng noted in the original post) we very much so adhere to the "rules of the road" when it comes to walking on footpaths/sidewalks.

Sorry for resurrecting an old post but I'm glad I searched for this before asking the same question again. Though I'm thinking 7 years is outside the statute of limitations for re-asking a question. :mrgreen:

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 3:29 pm UTC
by trpmb6
ObsessoMom wrote:Any theories here about what might be causing this weathering pattern?

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2018/06/u ... ink-fence/


This appears to be a rubber coating on the chain link fence. Fairly common in areas where children are present (a primary/elementary school fence around a play ground for instance). My guess is the rubber has seen prolonged UV exposure, or some other kind of environmental factor is breaking it down.

But also, Aliens.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 3:50 pm UTC
by Quercus
trpmb6 wrote:
ObsessoMom wrote:Any theories here about what might be causing this weathering pattern?

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2018/06/u ... ink-fence/


This appears to be a rubber coating on the chain link fence. Fairly common in areas where children are present (a primary/elementary school fence around a play ground for instance). My guess is the rubber has seen prolonged UV exposure, or some other kind of environmental factor is breaking it down.

But also, Aliens.


The pattern is very reminiscent of those produced in the [url=https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belousov–Zhabotinsky_reaction]Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction[/url] when it's performed in a Petri dish. I wonder if there's a similar organising principle behind the patterns on the fence. I did know at one point what the principle behind the BZ patterns was, but I can't recall it.

Edit: I have no clue what's wrong with my link syntax - help?

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 4:07 pm UTC
by HES
Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

No idea what was up with yours. Had the same issue with a quoted/pasted copy... it wouldn't work until I retyped it letter-for-letter.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 4:15 pm UTC
by Quercus
HES wrote:Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction

No idea what was up with yours. Had the same issue with a quoted/pasted copy... it wouldn't work until I retyped it letter-for-letter.

Weird. Maybe a non-printing character snuck in there somehow. Thanks for fixing it!

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 5:11 pm UTC
by trpmb6
[url=https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belousov–Zhabotinsky_reaction]Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction[/url]
Belousov-Zhabotinksy reaction

Top one is copy pasted. The bottom one is retyped, verbatim. Must be something embeded I can't see.

Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction

The one above I replaced the dash symbol. It's hard to tell but there looks to be a slight one or two pixel difference between this dash: " – " and this one which is hand typed " - "

So that is the character triggering the error.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 5:32 pm UTC
by gmalivuk
If you paste it into Google the difference becomes much more noticeable. Wikipedia uses the en-dash for this sort of article, which isn't the usual typed character, and apparently that breaks BBCode.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 5:49 pm UTC
by Quercus
gmalivuk wrote:If you paste it into Google the difference becomes much more noticeable. Wikipedia uses the en-dash for this sort of article, which isn't the usual typed character, and apparently that breaks BBCode.


Huh, interesting. Thanks for the collective diagnosis everyone!

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:15 pm UTC
by Sizik
It almost looks like some sort of mold growth.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 1:10 am UTC
by Liri
It looks more like a hyphen to me.

Re: Questions For The World

Posted: Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:45 am UTC
by PM 2Ring
Not to be confused with hyphae.