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Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:24 am UTC
by poxic
I hate computers with the fire of a thousand singed eyebrows.

That said: I'm using Windows Media Player, version 12, on Win7. I have copied a CD onto the hard drive and named all the tracks what they should be called. Now I want to drop these songs into a playlist in WMP.

When I did that, none of the track titles copied over. They all became "01 Track 1" and so forth. I dig around and find a (completely pants on head) way to tag them properly, by pretending to find album info online but actually choosing to edit.

Thing is, when the edit page came up, the song order was scrambled. I dutifully (re)copied all the titles off the album cover, saved, went back to the playlist, and now everything is utterly and completely wrong. I don't yet know the album well enough to know the song names, even with a full listen for some of them (Laurie Anderson is quite the creative type).

I worked through it by comparing songs on the playlist to the CD. Finally figured it out, or thought I did. So I went back to re-edit album info, fucked it up somehow, and it only gets fuckier the more times I do it. My cheat sheet of which "song number" maps to which actual song number is useless.

I tried deleting the playlist entirely. I tried deleting everything out of the media library (but not off the computer) to force WMP to forget the old wrong song names. Apparently it doesn't work that way -- somewhere deep in the bowels of Windows, there are permanent records of the botched titles like a dozen stinky corn kernels and I can't find them to blow them away and start again.

Heeeeeelp, I guess. Also, apologies for the turn taken by that last analogy.

Re: Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:53 am UTC
by Weeks
How did you edit the tracks? Maybe you just edited the name of the file. If you right click the file and see the properties, you'll find a tab that says "Details", and shows some stuff like Title, Subtitle, Artist, Album, etc. etc.

I don't know much about WMP because I haven't used it since I first installed foobar2000 like 6 or 7 years ago. It lets you create playlists, edit file properties, and a whole bunch of other stuff, while having a minimalistic GUI.

Re: Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:52 am UTC
by poxic
When you're in a particular version of the Play window, you can right-click on a song (or group of songs, but not the playlist title) and select "Find album info". This goes to an online service and tries to find a matching album. From there, choose "Edit" on the left side and it will let you enter the album/artist/genre, and also the track numbers and names. But not in the same order as they actually appear in the file location, nor on the album it finds (if it finds one), nor any other discernible order.

There are a few reasons I'm always annoyed at WMP. This one's just the latest. I might try foobar2000 and see if that's less cortisol-intensive.

Re: Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:18 am UTC
by Thesh
Yeah, sounds like the ID3 tags in the file themselves are messed up. I've used mp3tag to good success for everything from removing stupid descriptors like [explicit] or [instrumental] from song titles to adding album art - it has all sorts of bulk editing capabilities too.

Re: Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 1:54 pm UTC
by Zohar
I do what Thesh does in these cases.

Re: Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:10 pm UTC
by poxic
Will look into that. The album isn't that old but doesn't seem to have any tags at all, other than track number.

Re: Windows Media Player persistent wrong song names

Posted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 5:11 pm UTC
by Tim De Baets
Which music format did you rip to: MP3, WMA, or WAV? WAV has very limited tagging support, so if you ripped to that format then that might explain the issues that you're seeing.