Interesting Roleplaying and LARP Stories

Of the Tabletop, and other, lesser varieties.

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ZeroSum
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby ZeroSum » Fri Feb 01, 2008 3:08 pm UTC

There's a reason my group called it "The Book of Vile Dorkness".

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Ixtellor » Fri Feb 01, 2008 8:15 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
Ixtellor wrote:I don't see the problem.

Saddam H, was not charismatic. He was smart = INT, and calculatingly ruthless = LE, and he could kill you in an instant.
He ruled a decent sized nation, because he was clever and people were scared to death of him. Much like little Devils are getting turned to ash or having their heart torn from their chest.
You could have the Charisma of a rock, as long as people live in constant fear of offending you, and you are smart enough to keep your domain in order and perceive the problems and complications.

IMHO, Charisma is one of the less important attributes in ruling a Devil Society. No matter how good you are at making people believe in your and support you, they will tear out your heart in an instant if they think they can defeat you.

Ixtellor


Because Asmodeus is CONSTANTLY described as being so fucking charming that anyone will do anything for him whenever he asks because he's that fucking smooth. Smooth enough to talk the cold out of ice smooth. Smooth enough to convince a hurricane that it's a light breeze.

And they make his charisma barely above what a regular PC could get with a little work.


It's about as smart as going

Atlas

Titan of the Greek Pantheon, he was tricked into holding the world forever blah blah blah. He's incredibly strong. Like, stronger than strong. True, he's not exactly all that intelligent because he got tricked by the ol' "Alright, I'll stand here forever, but could you pick it up for just a second while I settle it on my shoulders?" routine

Strength - 20
Intelligence - 22


That seems logical.

I thought you were referring to all Devil Leadership.

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Feb 01, 2008 8:29 pm UTC

Nah, not all of them. Bel, the Lord of the First, is described as controlling out of might as well as tactical genius... and the fact that no one else really wants his job of running the Blood War. He needs strength as his highest attribute, and it's how his stats are written.

The Lords of the Nine are a mix of some of them being Charismatic, some of them being Cunning, and one or two of them in power because Asmodeus wants them in power. The problem is, on the whole, even the ones described as being charismatic and thoughtful with plans upon plans, they're all given stats meant for toe-to-toe combatfests. Makes no damned sense...

But then, while yes, TSR went under because it kept producing worlds upon worlds and books of fluff with very little rules and buried itself in it's own "Publish Publish Publish!!".. WotC's taken it too far the other way... they barely produce any background, it's all books of forty new feats, eighty new spells, and sixteen new prestige classes and six new base classes. And a rough outline that this new monster is superbad. For reals. He's got a CR32. He's superbad. We think he lives in caves.. maybe. And he fills no ecological niche, has no culture, and in general makes no sense. But he's a CR32, which our research showed was a underrepresented CR tier.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Jessica » Fri Feb 01, 2008 10:22 pm UTC

@secondtalon: While I see what you're trying to say, I can only retort by saying that, many people want that. DMs and PCs can come up with their own stories, and backstories. They have a harder time coming up with ballanced rules.

Yeah, it'd be nice if there was a bunch of story ideas instead of just "more feats", but... well people like more feats. It gives their characters something tangible to strive toward, and to plug into their characters. Same with new monsters and new spells.

I don't really mean that as a bad thing about gamers or D&D gamers. I just think that people who buy books want, in general, something more than "well, here's a setting with no rules". Sure, fluff up my books, but in the end, there had better be some rules crunch, or I'm not going to think it's worth my $20-$40.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Feb 01, 2008 11:46 pm UTC

Gharbad wrote:@secondtalon: While I see what you're trying to say, I can only retort by saying that, many people want that. DMs and PCs can come up with their own stories, and backstories. They have a harder time coming up with balanced rules. Yeah, it'd be nice if there was a bunch of story ideas instead of just "more feats", but... well people like more feats. It gives their characters something tangible to strive toward, and to plug into their characters. Same with new monsters and new spells. I don't really mean that as a bad thing about gamers or D&D gamers. I just think that people who buy books want, in general, something more than "well, here's a setting with no rules". Sure, fluff up my books, but in the end, there had better be some rules crunch, or I'm not going to think it's worth my $20-$40.


Now.. I admit that I haven't played in the widest variety of games... for the most part, they've all been well-thought out, nicely done, blah blah blah.

75% of them still could have all taken place in the exact same world, same continent, same town, same everything. Only difference a lot of the time was the name of the ruler in charge, and how half-orcs were treated.

I understand you can't just saddle a book with nothing but fluff. I'm just curious as why.. for example.. the Fiendish Codex I, all about demons, managed to take up 160 pages and not even provide a quarter* of the information found in Faces of Evil, a book that's only 96 pages, and covers the Devils, the Demons, the Yugoloths, the Ghereleths, and even manages a terse section on Bodaks, Hordlings, Night Hags, Shadow Fiends, and Tieflings. (Demons take up pages 40-64... 24 total)

Yes, that book was nothing but fluff. But you would think they could at least pull in their old library and use it.

*I'm exaggerating. It was less. Oh, you got mechanics down, sure.. but nothing to describe the personality of a demon. So a DM has no idea how to approach taking on the role of a demon who's holding a town hostage other than "RAR! Gimme .. uh.. Money.. I guess....?"
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Jessica » Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:22 am UTC

I will agree that wizards books could have a little more fluff for their crunch. It would be nice to see a little more about what it's like to be a demon, or how to play them. that could be interesting.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Midnight » Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:41 am UTC

a few friends and i invented the Shady Scale, on 1-100, on how shady bars were.

i, personally, got into the shadiest bar in town.. mostly because the guard at the door got kneed in the genitals.
Then i got kicked out, quite literally, by a half red-dragon who threw me ten feet and splintered the oak wall that i slammed into.

Later, i was in a slightly less shady bar, and ended up going down some secret stairs, wtfpwnting a guy (whoo bard/urban ranger!)... getting knocked out by a clerk's magic crossbow... so i end up in a jail cell, pick the lock, run outside...
right into a ridiculous pyromancer four levels higher than me...

I get killed.




my cousin, who was the other protagnoist, didn't even follow me downstairs, heh. He was rear guard. And never guarded.
that mission.. erm.. ended.
uhhhh fuck.

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby LE4dGOLEM » Fri Feb 08, 2008 7:30 pm UTC

Midnight wrote:a few friends and i invented the Shady Scale, on 1-100, on how shady bars were.


Was there a way to calculate this, or was it just "this bar is d% shady, and so I will use x encounters"?
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby saxything43 » Tue Mar 04, 2008 11:04 pm UTC

My group was recently on a campaign to reclaim a book from an evil sorcerer. One of the members of our group, an evil rogue, found this book before we realized what was going on and kept it. Later, he accidentally turned our bard's hand (only his hand wtf) undead, and tried to cleanse him from other spells in the book. However, because he sucked at magic so bad, the infection spread, and he had to take the bard away from the group and into town to get his arm amputated. The rest of the group caught up with the bard in the hospital minus one arm, and one of us asked the appropriate question: If a bard is already useless, what is a one-armed bard?

We left him in the hospital to live out the rest of his days as a cripple.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby michaelandjimi » Fri Mar 07, 2008 12:57 am UTC

Damn, I put the best adventure story in another thread because I lacked knowledge of the existence of this one.

Another one I remember was an adventure where we had found a whole bunch of potions but never got around to identifying them.
And then got completely owned up by a bunch of monsters in a room.
Cue running around the room whilst drinking random potions until getting healed. Ended up being completely buffed and taking out each of the monsters in about one hit because I had been potion-buffed so much.

Also, I also hate paladins who are just like "Oh, he's evil, lets kill him." I was playing a Chaotic Neutral warlock. He regularly makes deals with devils to get his powers. He is chaotic neutral - only out for himself, really. So when a devil (or demon, I forget which) comes to me in a dream and offers a deal, I take it. I didn't have to do anything evil or whatever, just not tell the party it had happened and something else. But when the paladin finds out, he leaves me in a room after getting beaten up by a monster. I had to be very ingenious to survive, and then later *accidentally* didn't help him out in the next encounter.

I became Chaotic Good, because I couldn't be bothered to go through that again.

Also, that same demon tried to make a deal with one of the other characters, the DM didn't check to see that the guy was playing a girl, then offers him lots of girls in exchange for something. Cue demon getting pimp-slapped back to hell.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Mar 07, 2008 2:02 am UTC

Regardless of what's on your sheet, if you play a character that looks out for number one, you're playing an evil character, at least via the D&D definitions.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Jack21222 » Fri Mar 07, 2008 3:30 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Regardless of what's on your sheet, if you play a character that looks out for number one, you're playing an evil character, at least via the D&D definitions.


Most residents of most areas in most campaign settings would consider consorting with evil outsiders such as devils and demons as "evil" too.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Fri Mar 07, 2008 3:32 am UTC

My bet is that his campaign/DM doesn't accommodate him being evil (for example, the little DnD I've played is all Living Greyhawk, where we can't be evil-aligned) and as such he writes down "neutral" and stretches the definition a bit.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby michaelandjimi » Fri Mar 07, 2008 6:28 am UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:My bet is that his campaign/DM doesn't accommodate him being evil (for example, the little DnD I've played is all Living Greyhawk, where we can't be evil-aligned) and as such he writes down "neutral" and stretches the definition a bit.

Yeah, basically. That's about the only evil thing he does, gaining powers from demons. I mean, he doesn't plot to burn down orphanages or overthrow people or anything. He also, as per normal, strongly defends his party and stuff.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Azrael001 » Fri Mar 07, 2008 7:03 am UTC

This is a GURPS story rather than DnD, but it fits best here.

My brother was running a game for his friends. He made up the overall plot in advance but more or less improvised the game. The basic plot is that the king has lost control of his kingdom because the various lords have started to ignore him or have turned outright hostile. The king is hiding out in a fortress surrounded by a huge forest with no major roads leading directly to it (this is important).

The PC's are sent out with a number of NPC's as official help from the King. Upon entering the woods one is immediately killed by a great sword that pins him to a boulder, the Half Troll is not strong enough to pull it out. They continue on and hear it pulled out. They see no one. That night more NPC's get killed while on watch, no one hears anything.

At the end of this day they find (in the middle of the woods with no roads) an inn. It is run by a little old lady. Glad to get out of the forest o' death they get a room. In the middle of the night one of them wakes up to find the old lady dragging a large sack out of the room. He follows her to the basement where he finds that it is another of the hapless NPC's who soon gets sacrificed to summon a demon. The demon's special abilities were rolled randomly and originally they were invisibility and damage resistance. Realizing that with the entire party asleep, an invisible demon would end up being a TPK he gives it wings instead of invisibility. Smashing up through the roof woke everyone up. After the epic battle he pointed out that an inn in the middle of an unihabitted forest with no path let alone road leading to it should have rung some warning bells. They were more cautious from then on.

____________


Another one of my brother's GURPS stories (his friends were much more willing to play than mine.)

This time one of his friends was running the game. My brother's character was an unholy theiving machine, (17 DEX, and lots of points put into pickpocket and the like.) anyways, the GM was getting sick of Matt always stealing everything that wasn't bolted down, so he planned for him to get caught in public. The next person who he tried to pickpocket caught him by the wrist. Not skipping a beat Matt yells "Thief! I challenge you to a duel!"

The GM grinned evilly and because Matt was a high Dex character he assumed that he would only have lighter weapons as his skills. He accidentally picks a weapon for the duel that Matt has a skill of 17 or 18 in, rather than a 10 or 13 (rolls have got to be lower than the skill level to succeed, 3d6 are used.) Matt wins the duel hands down.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Midnight » Sat Mar 08, 2008 10:11 pm UTC

LE4dGOLEM wrote:
Midnight wrote:a few friends and i invented the Shady Scale, on 1-100, on how shady bars were.


Was there a way to calculate this, or was it just "this bar is d% shady, and so I will use x encounters"?

erm, no, it was more like.. well.. we just SAID how shady it was. if it was shady, we checked it out. But it wasn't like any random encounter stuff... it was just.. we were looking for the shadiest type of people so we went into the shadiest type of bars.
uhhhh fuck.

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby TGGeko » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:36 pm UTC

One time we entered some ruins to take down this guy, when we finally fought our way through some elementals, we came across the guy. During his monologue where he is about to put on this amulet which we know will fuck us all over, our hulking hurler when he throws a grappling hook and tries rips the amulet out of the guy's hand. The DM has a fit and finally compromises with a natural 20 as the only way it could happen. Guess what? nat 20. The Dice gods were smiling on us that day. Totally screwed over the DM's boss plans.

In my campaign, everyone was paired off with a task. The rogue had a pattern of critical failures followed by extreamly high rolls. Like when he had to climb a wall. Nat 1, he trips and lands on his face. Next round 18: he catapults over the wall.

The druid: shape shift and twice rolls a nat 20: He deals 4x the damage and the match is over in 1 round.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Xaddak » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:43 pm UTC

I was in a group once that didn't have a healer of ANY kind. No druid, no paladin, no cleric, I don't think anybody even had any skill points in Heal. So the DM gave us a knife. A very strange knife... the Butter Knife of Healing (Small, Piercing/Slashing, (1d4) - 5 damage). Needless to say, we got slaughtered in our second or third encounter.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Azrael001 » Sun Mar 16, 2008 7:56 pm UTC

There is something wrong with my group. We can't roll average numbers. All of our rolls are either very high or very low, for example in our last session we were escorting a merchant to a neighboring town. On the way we were ambushed by some goblinoids. Being the Paladin, I am in the front being a meat shield. My party did more damage to me with their bows than the goblinoids did. Immediately following that, we were forced to take shelter from a major storm in a convenient tomb...

Upon our entry we were set upon by a swarm of rats all scrambling to escape the inner part of the tomb. We criticaled almost all of them. We then found some bugbears deeper inside the tomb, they to were destroyed by criticals. The boss then almost killed one of us in one hit, and we missed him five times out of six. It was awful. We gained a level for our troubles at the end, when I rolled for my HP increase I rolled one.

I was sad.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby SecondTalon » Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:22 pm UTC

TGGeko wrote:One time we entered some ruins to take down this guy, when we finally fought our way through some elementals, we came across the guy. During his monologue where he is about to put on this amulet which we know will fuck us all over, our hulking hurler when he throws a grappling hook and tries rips the amulet out of the guy's hand. The DM has a fit


See, that's where the DM needs to be reminded "There are no cutscenes in Dungeons and Dragons"

Or any DM who has a villain monologue is pretty much saying "Arrow to the face! This guy needs an arrow to the face! Or large rock! Maybe a thrown axe! Hell, if you have a guy who can throw halflings, throw a halfing in this guy's face RIGHTNOW!"

I mean, I've had a couple DMs try to do the cutscene thing and... well, other than never really having them as a DM again, I and whomever I was gaming with usually made it our mission to interrupt any sort of "Ha ha! I have the last piece of the puzzle and I will now activate the thing that will allow me to rule the world and you can't stop me!"

Usually with arrows right around the word "Have"
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Azrael001 » Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:39 pm UTC

That reminds me of another funny thing about my group. Our DM usually avoids rails, but in our last session, where we were sent to the tomb by the weather, the rails were obvious.

We were walking down the trail when he said that storm clouds were gathering. We asked if there "happened" to be a cave or something nearby, the Ranger having a Knowledge: Local Geography skill, was able to confirm that there was indeed a place to go. We happily hopped on the rails and dashed for the cave. It was only after we got there that the weather became bad.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Xaddak » Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:59 pm UTC

I remembered some other stories.

Story One: So our party was walking along these hills when we were attacked by a group of rocs (the birds). Combat carried on pretty boringly for a few rounds, when the ranger had an idea that I helped out a bit with.

Step One: Tie ropes to arrows.
Step Two: Aim at the nearest roc's wings
Step Three: Fire

What the ranger and I ended up doing was putting arrows through the roc's wings and then climbing them in order to get onto it. However, our DM was feeling malicious, and told us that as we were climbing, our ropes had gotten wrapped around each other and were twisting up behind us as we climbed (and I don't imagine our weight helped). So the space in which the roc could flap its wings was constantly getting smaller, as the wings were pulled together by the twisting ropes, and then, just as we managed to get onto the roc's back, it could no longer support itself in flight.

Thank the gods for the trees!

We ended up crashing into the top of a very, very high tree, which thankfully killed the roc. So there we are, sitting on the corpse of a roc we just rode as it crashed into a giant tree and died. So, naturally, we took off our backpacks, dropped the stuff to the forest floor, stuffed the backpacks with feathers from the roc, and jumped, intending to use the backpacks as cushions.

Somehow, both the ranger and I survived the jump with minimal falling damage.

Story Two: I think this was later on in the same campaign as the above story. Our party was on a boat sailing across the ocean when we were attacked by a black dragon. We managed to kill it, but as we did, the body crashed down into the boat, destroying it, and killing half the crew. Desperately, we tried to build an ad-hoc raft or something. However, the dwarf, who happened to have points in Craft(Boatbuilding) or something, told the DM, "I try to repair the boat."

Go on. Guess what he rolled.

Of course it was a natural 20. We all stared at him, and then as one, turned to the DM, who was looking at the d20 as if it had betrayed him.

The dwarf ended up building a new boat out of the wreckage, one-half the size of the old one, which was convenient, since half the crew had died (although I am pretty sure the crew/boat size relationship isn't necessarily as linear as that). And so, off we sailed into the sunset.

Story Three: I think the reason we kept getting such odd events happening to us was because the DM was trying to kill us and end the campaign. I am, in fact, fairly sure of it, because he asked me to take over DM'ing and kill the party (I guess I am even MORE devious and malicious than he is).

So, as we sat down to play, I told the players there was a brilliant flash of light, and when their eyes cleared, they could see they were on a flat, featureless plain (no, no rocks fell, killing everyone). Just dirt as far as the eye could see. Well, except for the monsters. Did I mention those?

*insert slaughter here*

Finally I had it down to just one of the PCs left, but for some reason, he just would not die. So I started herding him backward. Why? Because this "plain" was actually a 100m x 100m floating square in an empty void, with a 360 degree illusion to make it appear as if the plain continued past the actual borders. And yes, I had planned that beforehand, and showed it to the old DM just to prove I wasn't making it up on the spot when the PC died. Which of course, when I told him he fell off an edge he couldn't see into an empty void, and died some time later of starvation, he promptly accused me of making it up, and I showed him my crude sketch of the place. :D
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby ZeroSum » Mon Mar 17, 2008 2:55 pm UTC

Azrael001 wrote:There is something wrong with my group. We can't roll average numbers. All of our rolls are either very high or very low
With one group I was capable of rolling practically nothing but 3s and 20s. That was a fun time.

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Jessica » Mon Mar 17, 2008 5:31 pm UTC

Xaddak wrote:Story Three: I think the reason we kept getting such odd events happening to us was because the DM was trying to kill us and end the campaign. I am, in fact, fairly sure of it, because he asked me to take over DM'ing and kill the party (I guess I am even MORE devious and malicious than he is).

So, as we sat down to play, I told the players there was a brilliant flash of light, and when their eyes cleared, they could see they were on a flat, featureless plain (no, no rocks fell, killing everyone). Just dirt as far as the eye could see. Well, except for the monsters. Did I mention those?

*insert slaughter here*

Finally I had it down to just one of the PCs left, but for some reason, he just would not die. So I started herding him backward. Why? Because this "plain" was actually a 100m x 100m floating square in an empty void, with a 360 degree illusion to make it appear as if the plain continued past the actual borders. And yes, I had planned that beforehand, and showed it to the old DM just to prove I wasn't making it up on the spot when the PC died. Which of course, when I told him he fell off an edge he couldn't see into an empty void, and died some time later of starvation, he promptly accused me of making it up, and I showed him my crude sketch of the place. :D


Meh sounds pretty stupid to me. If my DM did that to me, I'd probably never game with them again. I mean, if you want to end the game, you should have the balls to just say "I don't want to run this anymore. The game ends", instead of teleporting the party into an unwinable situation and making it seem like it's possible to win.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Xaddak » Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:00 pm UTC

Oh, we told them before that session started that they were there to die. They were actually excited by the chance to mess up my murderin' plans.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Chrismclegless » Sun Mar 23, 2008 8:22 pm UTC

One of the problems I have with the d20 system is the natural 20 idea. Its the idea that, "This is a one-in-a-million chance. You can do it if you roll a 20."

1/1000000 != 1/20

This is one of the reaseons why I use other systems when possible.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby LE4dGOLEM » Sun Mar 23, 2008 8:25 pm UTC

Why not set the DC higher than 20+(modifiers)?
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby thecommabandit » Sun Mar 23, 2008 9:21 pm UTC

Chrismclegless wrote:One of the problems I have with the d20 system is the natural 20 idea. Its the idea that, "This is a one-in-a-million chance. You can do it if you roll a 20."

1/1000000 != 1/20

This is one of the reasons why I use other systems when possible.

I haven't ever come across the idea that a natural twenty was a one-in-a-million, just that it was a rather skillful execution of whatever action you were performing.

In my D&D group (ironically, we play SWSE rather than actual D&D) we rarely ever get high rolls, and they're usually from the people who roleplay the more incompetent members. For example, one choice character is a narcissistic, cowardly ginger Bothan who thinks every woman is out to bed him (including the streetwise smuggler in the group which creates no end of friction/troubles/funnies) and is an excessive groomer. A bunch of swoop gang member waylay us on Citadel Station. The alcoholic soldier misses. Pyromaniacal Zabrak soldier misses and gets a horn shot off. Streetwise smuggler woman misses. Narcissistic, cowardly ginger Bothan hits and kills one straight away =/ While breaking into a small prison to free smuggler woman during the first session: naive farmer girl who hadn't left Dantooine before a few months ago racks up the most kills. The rest of them roll under seven most of the time, excepting most skill checks. We do fairly mediocre on those. Well, except that pilot check to avoid crash-landing on Korriban, but I have a feeling the DC was like over 9000 or something. Plot threads create obscenely high DC's.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby LE4dGOLEM » Sun Mar 23, 2008 10:49 pm UTC

thecommabandit wrote:narcissistic...ginger


...how?
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby BoomFrog » Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:09 am UTC

Chrismclegless wrote:One of the problems I have with the d20 system is the natural 20 idea. Its the idea that, "This is a one-in-a-million chance. You can do it if you roll a 20."

1/1000000 != 1/20

This is one of the reaseons why I use other systems when possible.


If you actually follow the current rules a roll of a twenty for skill checks will still fail if the task is too hard, but there is a holdover from the previous editions that a nat 20 always succeeds. These stories are the reasons a nat 20 should still fail sometimes, but it just feels wrong to us long time D&D players.

So for my own quick story:

I'm DMing and the party reaches the dungeon entrence. The door has a riddle, the answer to which is that it only opens during full moons. But the thief decides to pick the lock and gets a nat 20 and I let them open the door. (noob DM mistake, shouldn't have even let him roll) Normally there would be a guide waiting to meet them, but of course he's not planning on visitors except during full moons, so no ones there. The party stumbles into deathtraps with no hints on how to avoid them and leaves when someone dies in the 2nd room, never to return because the place was "too dangerous". Goodbye my only adventure a actually fully detailed out before the game session.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Maseiken » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:45 pm UTC

DM's discretion dude, they'll call it railroading, but sometimes it's not. As you say, you shouldn't've allowed the roll, or if so, you could let the nat 20 perhaps reveal the door's mechanism, but not activate it? Try not to railroad, but don't let the PCs crap on your campaign either...
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby ZeroSum » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:28 pm UTC

BoomFrog wrote:nat 20 always succeeds.
Natural 20 never auto-succeeded at skill checks in d20 just like natural 1 never auto-failed at skill checks.

As for the one-in-a-million is equivalent to one-in-twenty, it's a game that's supposed to let you do awesome shit like manifest fireballs in mid-air using nothing but bat guano and the power to manipulate the very cosmos to your will. Therefore, it's far more awesome that one-in-a-million happens more often than one-in-a-million, or else you might as well just be playing Life, the MMO that's more grind than WoW and has no flaming swords.

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Jessica » Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:18 pm UTC

Well, yes. Things which are possible but highly improbably should happen more than they do in real life. but, things which are nigh impossible at your current level should still be nigh impossible in a game.

Level 1 characters can't kill a full fledged dragon, without DM intervention. Really, no amount of 20s can allow a level 1 party kill a CR 15 dragon. Even "out of the box" thinking probably can't do it, unless the DM wants you to (for example: instead of fighting it, talking, or taking out the supports above the dragon, crushing it, etc.) But those, again, are DMs giving you a puzzle to figure out, not the lvl 1s killing a dragon.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Spuddly » Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:48 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:I find it difficult to believe that any good deity would condone hacking a guy down on the street simply because he blipped as being evil. Redemption and all that jazz...


St. Cuthbert of the Mace is all about that sort of thing. He's actually one of the deities that gave Asmodeous the go-ahead to create the Nine Hells, since punishment is necessary. Though that's why he's LN. Nevermind.

Paladins of Wee Jas are also possible. Tome of Battle has a cleric/crusader or crusader/paladin prestige class called the Ruby Knight Vindicator. You're a badass knight in the service of the Ruby Sorceress, Goddess of Death and Magic.

SecondTalon wrote:But you're right.. a demon, who's a physical embodiment of Chaos and Evil would burn an orphanage down. A Chaotic Evil Fighter might as well.. and his ass'll be dead in less than 36 hours if he doesn't run, and he won't be able to survive long on his own... After an act like that, acquiring food and a safe place to sleep for the night would be an adventure. Sure, you could run a couple towns over and you might be okay. Unless you keep pulling shit like that. Then you'll spend your life a hunted man, far too busy trying to stay alive to go dungeon raiding.


Unless you're a level 15 fighter who venerates Demogorgon, Prince of Beasts, and sacrificed the orphanage in His Name. In which case, there's not a whole lot the town guard can do. It's even better if you're a cleric, since it's casters ftw.

Then the paladins start hunting you, but hey, Evil campaigns need antagonists too!

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Those stat blocks are for the aspects of the devils, not the actual devils' stats. Asmodeus would have stats: yes. Lots. It's just that he creates an aspect of himself to go do his bidding in other places where he doesn't put himself at risk.
I mean, we're talking about a creature who bleeds Pit Fiends, and those Pit Fiends bleed lesser demons.

At least for the stat blocks in FCII.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Jack21222 » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:24 pm UTC

Maseiken wrote:DM's discretion dude, they'll call it railroading, but sometimes it's not. As you say, you shouldn't've allowed the roll, or if so, you could let the nat 20 perhaps reveal the door's mechanism, but not activate it? Try not to railroad, but don't let the PCs crap on your campaign either...


I've only been in one campaign, but the DM's way of doing that is requiring multiple natural 20s to do something that should be near impossible. My rogue wanted to try to pick a magical lock that wasn't supposed to be opened. I reckoned that my rogue had no clue it wasn't meant to be opened, so he was going to try anyway. She told me that I'd have to double-crit to actually do it. I failed, of course.

Anyway, here's a story from her blog about a situation like that:

Once, my players made it to the final villain, a big bad powerful sorcerer they had NO CHANCE of defeating in open combat... or so I thought.

The villain started monologuing, and before I got out 2 sentences a player said "I'm going to tumble to get in range and plant my dagger between his eyes." I was like "Okay, you can try, but you are at negative a-gabillion to make that actually happen."

He critted all three rolls: Initiative, tumbling, and called shot.

I sighed and said: "Okay, you plant your dagger in his forehead and he dies. You win!"

Most anticlimactic ending to a campaign EVER.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Maseiken » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:26 pm UTC

Spuddly wrote:We're talking about a creature who bleeds Pit Fiends, and those Pit Fiends bleed lesser demons.

That is really absurdly cool.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby Col. Mustard » Wed Mar 26, 2008 10:49 pm UTC

The DM I used to play with used to treat highly improbable feats as purely impossible. No chance to even try to roll for the crits. He would just say "Nope, it can't be done." He really pissed the group off.

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Jack21222 wrote:Once, Col. Mustard made it to Maseken, a big bad powerful sorcerer he had NO CHANCE of defeating in open combat... or so I thought.

Maseiken started monologuing, and before I got out 2 sentences Col. Mustard said "I'm going to tumble to get in range and plant my dagger between his eyes." I was like "Okay, you can try, but you are at negative a-gabillion to make that actually happen."

The Colonel critted all three rolls: Initiative, tumbling, and called shot.

I sighed and said: "Okay, you plant your dagger in his forehead and he dies. You win!"

Most anticlimactic ending to an assassination EVER.

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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby McCaber » Thu Mar 27, 2008 12:51 am UTC

I don't play D&D, but I think I have a story from another system that totally kills the Col. of Mustard.

We discover a cultist plot to poison the city's wells, and the authorities call us crazy. We manage to discover one of their bases and keep it watched. When one of them made his move, we followed him through the streets to one of the main wells. In the ensuing fight, we killed the cultist but lost the bag of highly concentrated mutagenic dust. We noticed it after about five minutes of searching, kicked over and spread across the entire square. Needless to say, we cleared out of that city real quickly.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby lowbart » Thu Mar 27, 2008 3:22 pm UTC

Can we all agree that if you're going to do that "Fixed" thing, that you should always mark the changes that you made? People have been skipping that a lot lately and it drives me crazy.
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Re: Interesting D&D Stories

Postby CogDissident » Wed Apr 02, 2008 4:00 pm UTC

Well, I was playing through a module called "World's Largest Dungeon". If you've heard of it, yes, all the way through. We even have an entire log, written in-character, of the whole multi-year game.

Anyway, I'm a warforged artificer, and I tend to be the party spokesman. At some point previously, we entered a room that was a tomb of an anchient powerful necromancer, who's soul was bound to his evil book. Naturally, being adventurers, we killed him. Then I said, hey, I can use that book. And whats this? A black robe of the magi? UMD = win for me. I can't take 10 on UMD, but I can take 1, and still get a 30 for emulating an evil alignment. Anyway, I took the robe, and had been wearing it for months. Also, carrying and using the book rather often.

We go to a new region, walk right into a whole bunch of angels sitting around guarding the room from devils that were aparently sealed away in the direction we came from (we killed them). I stride purposefully into the room, and in my loudest (little) voice, say "Don't worry, we're here to slay good! I meant evil! Evil!"


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