Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Of the Tabletop, and other, lesser varieties.

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 5:53 pm UTC

So here's a problem for my fellow players: How do you make quick, cheap difficult terrain where none exists?

I won't go into the details but suffice to say I'm building a character who would be at a signifigant advantage when fighting opponents on difficult terrain.

I've looked around for a mundane or alchemical solution but I haven't found anything that works really well. Anyone know a solution? (character does not have UMD, but does have a druid friend, if that helps)
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

User avatar
Goldstein
Posts: 985
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: Newcastle, UK

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Goldstein » Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:07 pm UTC

Are caltrops or some kind of oil not available? I know neither necessarily forces half speed, but it's better than nothing.

What edition are we talking here, what levels are the characters, and is it the 'half speed' thing you're aiming for when you talk about creating difficult terrain?

Edit: Wasn't paying enough attention, sorry that I overlooked your mention of the significant advantage in combat. Still, what system are you using? I don't know which of these technically count as difficult terrain.
Last edited by Goldstein on Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:22 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
Chuff wrote:I write most of my letters from the bottom

User avatar
Jessica
Jessica, you're a ...
Posts: 8337
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 8:57 pm UTC
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Jessica » Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:19 pm UTC

Web, Fog effects (I'm pretty sure there are an assload of fog spells in 3.5), Darkness.

Web's probably your best bet, all things considered. cheap effective immobilization. I guess any ice-like spells which have similar freezing/status effects. Or, yeah... alchemist's fire, caltrops, and... fuck there's another one that is sticky... can't remember.

Maybe something in the illusion school, but then I'm starting to get out of my comfort range of knowledge.
doogly wrote:On a scale of Mr Rogers to Fascism, how mean do you think we're being?
Belial wrote:My goal is to be the best brain infection any of you have ever had.

User avatar
Decker
Posts: 2071
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 4:22 pm UTC
Location: Western N.Y.

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Decker » Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:22 pm UTC

Jessica wrote:Or, yeah... alchemist's fire, caltrops, and... fuck there's another one that is sticky... can't remember.

Tanglefoot bag?
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

User avatar
Jessica
Jessica, you're a ...
Posts: 8337
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 8:57 pm UTC
Location: Soviet Canuckistan

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Jessica » Mon Jan 11, 2010 7:30 pm UTC

That's the one! Thanks Decker.
doogly wrote:On a scale of Mr Rogers to Fascism, how mean do you think we're being?
Belial wrote:My goal is to be the best brain infection any of you have ever had.

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:34 pm UTC

Ah. right, edition. Yea that would be important! *L* Playing 3.5

Now things like Caltrops are all well and good if you just need to slow someone down, but it won't suit my purposes.

I need actual, clearly classified Difficult Terrain. Essentially I get a bonus for fighting my opponent on Difficult Terrain. And while there's lots of spells and items that do things like slow or restrict movement, I've found an alarming number of them aren't, strictly speaking, making difficult terrain.

Also, I only have immunity to the effects of Difficult Terrain, not other effects, so something that, say, immobilizes everyone in the area could be bad for me.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

User avatar
Xanthir
My HERO!!!
Posts: 5400
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 12:49 am UTC
Location: The Googleplex
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Xanthir » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:49 pm UTC

The Utilitarian wrote:I need actual, clearly classified Difficult Terrain. Essentially I get a bonus for fighting my opponent on Difficult Terrain. And while there's lots of spells and items that do things like slow or restrict movement, I've found an alarming number of them aren't, strictly speaking, making difficult terrain.

Also, I only have immunity to the effects of Difficult Terrain, not other effects, so something that, say, immobilizes everyone in the area could be bad for me.

This is largely a result of the fact that 3e didn't have a good, visible sense of "difficult terrain", and so tons of rules that could have potentially hooked into it didn't. (There are several places like this, where a surfeit of individual rules exist around a common concept, but they're not coordinated in such a way that you can actually *use* the fact that they all share the concept.)

These rules *should* hook together. If your movement is hindered in some way, it should count as Difficult Terrain for your purposes. Caltrops, ice, grease, tentacles, whatever. It's all Difficult Terrain.
(defun fibs (n &optional (a 1) (b 1)) (take n (unfold '+ a b)))

User avatar
Decker
Posts: 2071
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 4:22 pm UTC
Location: Western N.Y.

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Decker » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:49 pm UTC

The Utilitarian wrote:Ah. right, edition. Yea that would be important! *L* Playing 3.5

Now things like Caltrops are all well and good if you just need to slow someone down, but it won't suit my purposes.

I need actual, clearly classified Difficult Terrain. Essentially I get a bonus for fighting my opponent on Difficult Terrain. And while there's lots of spells and items that do things like slow or restrict movement, I've found an alarming number of them aren't, strictly speaking, making difficult terrain.

Also, I only have immunity to the effects of Difficult Terrain, not other effects, so something that, say, immobilizes everyone in the area could be bad for me.

I don't have access to the books right now, but arn't there like...minor earthmoving spells you could use? Or earthquake? Make a crater with a fireball? I imagine anything explosive could kick up some dirt.
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:52 pm UTC

Decker wrote:
The Utilitarian wrote:Ah. right, edition. Yea that would be important! *L* Playing 3.5

Now things like Caltrops are all well and good if you just need to slow someone down, but it won't suit my purposes.

I need actual, clearly classified Difficult Terrain. Essentially I get a bonus for fighting my opponent on Difficult Terrain. And while there's lots of spells and items that do things like slow or restrict movement, I've found an alarming number of them aren't, strictly speaking, making difficult terrain.

Also, I only have immunity to the effects of Difficult Terrain, not other effects, so something that, say, immobilizes everyone in the area could be bad for me.

I don't have access to the books right now, but arn't there like...minor earthmoving spells you could use? Or earthquake? Make a crater with a fireball? I imagine anything explosive could kick up some dirt.

Yep, Soften Earth/Stone is one of my main contenders right now but I'm reliant on my druid friend for that and I don't want to burden her setting up my combat too much.

What I was REALLY hoping for was just something I could throw down on the floor and make a patch of difficult terrain. I went right for caltrops but they're JUST this side of not functional for what I need. Something really similar.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

User avatar
Decker
Posts: 2071
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 4:22 pm UTC
Location: Western N.Y.

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Decker » Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:56 pm UTC

Then the only thing I could suggest is next time you're in a big city, see if your DM will let you comission a wizard to make a wand or something like that for you.
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

User avatar
Yakk
Poster with most posts but no title.
Posts: 11115
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:27 pm UTC
Location: E pur si muove

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Yakk » Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:00 pm UTC

I thought Knights had some kind of difficult terrain ability in 3e?
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision - BR

Last edited by JHVH on Fri Oct 23, 4004 BCE 6:17 pm, edited 6 times in total.

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:03 pm UTC

Decker wrote:Then the only thing I could suggest is next time you're in a big city, see if your DM will let you comission a wizard to make a wand or something like that for you.

Perhaps some day, but this is going to be my first game with a brand new DM so I don't want to start bending the rules and making custom magic items just yet. Until then I'll just have to keep scouring my books for some kind of "light grease in a bag" item.

I thought Knights had some kind of difficult terrain ability in 3e?


they sure do but that's a ton of levels in a class that's entirely seperate from my character.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

Random832
Posts: 2525
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2007 4:38 pm UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Random832 » Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:26 pm UTC

Why not have actual fights on natural difficult terrain - just ask the DM not to unrealistically have every random encounter take place on an inexplicably flat open field.

Seriously - battles are on a piece of grid paper by default because it's no effort and usually doesn't matter, not because that's naturally where you will tend to be attacked.

User avatar
Decker
Posts: 2071
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 4:22 pm UTC
Location: Western N.Y.

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Decker » Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:32 pm UTC

The Utilitarian wrote:
Decker wrote:Then the only thing I could suggest is next time you're in a big city, see if your DM will let you comission a wizard to make a wand or something like that for you.

Perhaps some day, but this is going to be my first game with a brand new DM so I don't want to start bending the rules and making custom magic items just yet. Until then I'll just have to keep scouring my books for some kind of "light grease in a bag" item.

I don't think you would be bending any rules. There's lots of pricing information and rules in the DM guide for custom items. If you still don't want you're DM to go through that, that's fine.
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 9:42 pm UTC

Decker wrote:I don't think you would be bending any rules. There's lots of pricing information and rules in the DM guide for custom items. If you still don't want you're DM to go through that, that's fine.

Ah, I always consider custom item creation to be bending the rules. I know the guidelines for it are there in the DMG, and I've certainly had my fare share of custom magic items made in my time, but I can't help to feel like, rather than finding an innovative solution to a problem, that I'm simply throwing money at it to solve.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

User avatar
Goldstein
Posts: 985
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: Newcastle, UK

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Goldstein » Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:48 pm UTC

Buy a plough.
Chuff wrote:I write most of my letters from the bottom

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:53 pm UTC

Goldstein wrote:Buy a plough.

Cute, and effective... provided I have a few hours prior to the battle. -_^
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

Chen
Posts: 5565
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 6:53 pm UTC
Location: Montreal

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Chen » Tue Jan 12, 2010 3:01 pm UTC

Decker wrote:I don't think you would be bending any rules. There's lots of pricing information and rules in the DM guide for custom items. If you still don't want you're DM to go through that, that's fine.


The rules for making custom magical items in 3.5 D&D are horribly broken. Many low level spells have fairly dramatic effects when you can use them at will and cost a mere pittance. If I recall a sword that casts true strike at will (or on hit) costs significantly less than a +5 magical weapon, yet results in a +20 to hit. Similarly a stone or something that lets you cast cure light wounds at will is fairly cheap (or cure minor wounds and being even cheaper) and completely removes the need for out of combat healing. Already wands of cure light wounds and such remove most usage of healing spells and they're also dirt cheap.

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Tue Jan 12, 2010 9:45 pm UTC

Chen wrote:
Decker wrote:I don't think you would be bending any rules. There's lots of pricing information and rules in the DM guide for custom items. If you still don't want you're DM to go through that, that's fine.


The rules for making custom magical items in 3.5 D&D are horribly broken. Many low level spells have fairly dramatic effects when you can use them at will and cost a mere pittance. If I recall a sword that casts true strike at will (or on hit) costs significantly less than a +5 magical weapon, yet results in a +20 to hit. Similarly a stone or something that lets you cast cure light wounds at will is fairly cheap (or cure minor wounds and being even cheaper) and completely removes the need for out of combat healing. Already wands of cure light wounds and such remove most usage of healing spells and they're also dirt cheap.

Aye, I suppose that's why the custom magic item creation guide is really just that, a guide for DMs to make custom magic item. They are not rules for players to use, like the formula for calcuating the cost and time of scribing a scroll. Ultimately it's the DM's job to look at any custom created magic item (or in some cases, some very broken published ones) and make the final call on adjusting the price based on the relative power of the item in question. It's a pretty delicate matter to judge, and certainly not something I want to burden my new DM with, at the very least until I know him better.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

Klapaucius
Posts: 712
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:00 pm UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Klapaucius » Wed Jan 13, 2010 5:03 pm UTC

Chen wrote:
Decker wrote:I don't think you would be bending any rules. There's lots of pricing information and rules in the DM guide for custom items. If you still don't want you're DM to go through that, that's fine.


The rules for making custom magical items in 3.5 D&D are horribly broken. Many low level spells have fairly dramatic effects when you can use them at will and cost a mere pittance. If I recall a sword that casts true strike at will (or on hit) costs significantly less than a +5 magical weapon, yet results in a +20 to hit. Similarly a stone or something that lets you cast cure light wounds at will is fairly cheap (or cure minor wounds and being even cheaper) and completely removes the need for out of combat healing. Already wands of cure light wounds and such remove most usage of healing spells and they're also dirt cheap.
Once my dwarven fighter gets some wealth under his belt, he's getting a Huge double maul that casts true strike at will and using it until the words "I use Power Attack at my BAB" lose all meaning.

Also, why would you want a sword that casts True Strike on a successful hit? Isn't that like casting darkness in a field of greater darkness to try and use your darkvision?
500%!

User avatar
Xanthir
My HERO!!!
Posts: 5400
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 12:49 am UTC
Location: The Googleplex
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Xanthir » Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:49 pm UTC

Chen wrote:
Decker wrote:I don't think you would be bending any rules. There's lots of pricing information and rules in the DM guide for custom items. If you still don't want you're DM to go through that, that's fine.


The rules for making custom magical items in 3.5 D&D are horribly broken. Many low level spells have fairly dramatic effects when you can use them at will and cost a mere pittance. If I recall a sword that casts true strike at will (or on hit) costs significantly less than a +5 magical weapon, yet results in a +20 to hit. Similarly a stone or something that lets you cast cure light wounds at will is fairly cheap (or cure minor wounds and being even cheaper) and completely removes the need for out of combat healing. Already wands of cure light wounds and such remove most usage of healing spells and they're also dirt cheap.

They're not rules, they're very rough pricing guidelines to help you get a first estimate. There IS a rule in the book for pricing magic items, though: look in the magic item list, and find items of similar power and attractiveness. If you would have a hard time choosing between buying the item and buying other items in the same price range, it's priced correctly.

The guidelines are indeed very bad for certain types of items, though. They don't distinguish properly between spells with different durations when doing "at will" or "continuous" effects. As a practical matter, the majority of round/level spells should never be at-will; most of them simply don't work when their durations are changed so radically. Plus, quite a few of them are straight stat boosts in one form or another, which have their own separate pricing guidelines. Frex, the various attribute-boosting spells (Owl's Wisdom, etc) should not be priced as an at-will spell, they should be priced as a continuous +4 to the attribute, which has a standard and balanced price.

True Strike is a straight attack bonus, which doesn't have an exact pricing guide in the table, but is obviously close to the weapon-enhancement-bonus effect. It would probably be appropriate to use bonus^2 * 1000 (half the amount of a normal weapon enhancement bonus) as a guideline. This would suggest that a constant +20 to attack would be somewhere around 400k, which is far past the price of any other magic item in existence, showing that such an item probably shouldn't appear in a game.

If you have a spell that isn't covered by one of the existing attribute formulas that you still want to turn constant, a rough guideline for doing so is to price it in the obvious way, where you have enough castings/day to cover an entire day (the constant item would be more useful than the one with that many castings, since you don't need to spend actions to continually recast it, but you get a bulk discount). Just extend the pricing formula. Again, though, this is nothing more than a starting point. The true price can only be obtained by comparing it with existing items.
(defun fibs (n &optional (a 1) (b 1)) (take n (unfold '+ a b)))

Chen
Posts: 5565
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 6:53 pm UTC
Location: Montreal

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Chen » Thu Jan 14, 2010 5:28 pm UTC

Klapaucius wrote:Also, why would you want a sword that casts True Strike on a successful hit? Isn't that like casting darkness in a field of greater darkness to try and use your darkvision?


I meant upon swinging it, and just chose the words wrong. I suppose though if it worked on hit your first attack is likely to hit anyways (at full BaB) so it would consistently allow your iterative attacks to hit as well. I doubt its any cheaper so its kinda pointless though.

I think one of the flaws they had in the game was making those magic item "guidelines". Anything that wasn't a standard "+x to attribute" or "+hit/damage" was broken and inconsistent. I think there were some base magic items that themselves didn't follow the creation guidelines with no real explanation of why besides the inference that "its too good to be that cheap so we made it more expensive by a seemingly arbitrary amount".

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26508
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby SecondTalon » Thu Jan 14, 2010 9:16 pm UTC

True Strike on a Weapon in 3.X -
Round 1 - Cast True Strike.
Round 2 - Attack with +20 to the roll. Additional attacks as per normal.
Round 3 - Cast True Strike.
Round 4 - Attack with +20 to the roll. Additional attacks as per normal.
Round 5 -... repeat

By the second attack, a clever opponent knows what you're doing and merely has to keep away from you for one round - and this is assuming your opponent has no spellcasting ability, as someone with a martial background would likely recognize what is going on (Huh.. they seem to fiddle with their weapon, then hit really really well, like completely bypassing my defenses as if they have some magical insight as to where I will be and where I will be vulnerable and.. then they do the weapon fiddling thing again..) After that round, the spell vanishes and you have to recast, wasting another round activating the ability while the whatever is mauling your face before yet again running the hell away when you have an active charge.

So, yeah.. if you have a True Strike Weapon, I'd expect all of your opponents to suddenly have a level or three of Barbarian or Monk, or have cast Expeditions Retreat on themselves, or some other method of making damn sure they can run faster than you.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
Sir_Elderberry
Posts: 4206
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:50 pm UTC
Location: Sector ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Mon Jan 18, 2010 2:05 pm UTC

rustycusak wrote:My wife never believes me when I tell her how much I learned from D&D. It really turned me on to ancient history. When I went to design campaigns and kingdoms, I researched political and social structures from the dark ages. A bit of history goes a long way in life.

Thanks.

In English, we spent a day discussing an overview of the history of the English language, which was pretty much the same thing as playing Brittania. Then we read Beowulf, and I couldn't help but get a D&D-vibe from it.
http://www.geekyhumanist.blogspot.com -- Science and the Concerned Voter
Belial wrote:You are the coolest guy that ever cooled.

I reiterate. Coolest. Guy.

Well. You heard him.

User avatar
Yakk
Poster with most posts but no title.
Posts: 11115
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:27 pm UTC
Location: E pur si muove

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Yakk » Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:57 pm UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:
rustycusak wrote:My wife never believes me when I tell her how much I learned from D&D. It really turned me on to ancient history. When I went to design campaigns and kingdoms, I researched political and social structures from the dark ages. A bit of history goes a long way in life.

Thanks.

In English, we spent a day discussing an overview of the history of the English language, which was pretty much the same thing as playing Brittania. Then we read Beowulf, and I couldn't help but get a D&D-vibe from it.

Is Brittania the game where the various populations invade [strike]England[/strike] Britain from boats, displacing/killing/absorbing the previous populations?

Little cardbord token game, right?
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision - BR

Last edited by JHVH on Fri Oct 23, 4004 BCE 6:17 pm, edited 6 times in total.

thicknavyrain
ThinkGravyTrain
Posts: 913
Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2007 12:41 pm UTC
Location: The Universe

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby thicknavyrain » Mon Jan 18, 2010 4:33 pm UTC

rustycusak wrote:My wife never believes me when I tell her how much I learned from D&D. It really turned me onto ancient history. When I went to design campaigns and kingdoms, I researched political and social structures from the dark ages. A bit of history goes a long way in life.

Thanks.


Strip DnD does that for me too. It's an unfortunate game for the DM though...
RoadieRich wrote:Thicknavyrain is appointed Nex Artifex, Author of Death of the second FaiD Assassins' Guild.

User avatar
Vaniver
Posts: 9422
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2006 2:12 am UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Vaniver » Mon Jan 18, 2010 5:37 pm UTC

Yakk wrote:Is Brittania the game where the various populations invade [strike]England[/strike] Britain from boats, displacing/killing/absorbing the previous populations?

Little cardbord token game, right?
Yep! I always loved being Red, because you could do phenomenally well as the Saxons, particularly if the Welsh player was defensive.
I mostly post over at LessWrong now.

Avatar from My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, owned by Hasbro.

User avatar
LE4dGOLEM
is unique......wait, no!!!!
Posts: 5972
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:10 pm UTC
Location: :uoıʇɐɔol

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby LE4dGOLEM » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:24 pm UTC

Learning realistic worldbuilding teaches geography like woah.
Image Une See Fights - crayon super-ish hero webcomic!
doogly wrote:It would just be much better if it were not shitty.

halbarad
Posts: 394
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:49 am UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby halbarad » Wed Jan 20, 2010 2:59 pm UTC

I may be taking part in a new D&D adventure a friend is planning that we have talked about for a few years, each character will be a planeswalker (M:TG style I believe) and you go round having merry adventures and probably eventually meeting up with each other and either working things out of fighting for control of a planes of existence.

The problem I've come across is deciding what character I want to play, I have access to every book for 3e and 3.5e so I have a lot of choices but I can't really think of many cool concepts (probably because I have so much choice). The planes of existence I have access to are all the basic D&D ones plus all the major ones that have appeared in M:TG. My initial plan was to play either a Monk from Rokugan/Oriental Adventures and go into Tattooed or Henshin monk who sought enlightenment and ended up a planeswalker, or go with a Psychic Warrior with monk like feats (Improved Unarmed Attack and a few others) with the same sort of background. However I realised this is a lot like a recent character I had for another game I was in and though it's fun I want something a bit different.

So I'm asking here for cool character concepts that people have come up with and either not tried or not been allowed to try. Only limitation is ECL 5, so races can be anything with +4 Level Adjustment or less.

tl;dr - Suggest cool character ideas for a D&D game across the planes of existence.

Klapaucius
Posts: 712
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:00 pm UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Klapaucius » Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:14 pm UTC

So a new trap in a dungeon I threw together has led me to wonder about the logistics of gelatinous cube interaction.
Okay, imagine a corridor which branches left and right at a 90 degree angle. The hallway is 10 by 10, making it the perfect environment for a gelatinous cube, and once the players reach the intersection, a door closes behind them.
So the left branch goes forward 20 feet before it turns into the next hallway, but a gelatinous cube is waiting just around a corner. The other branch goes 30 feet before leading into a 10'/10'/40' pit, with a gelatinous cube waiting on the bottom.
Additionally, there is a 10/10/10 nook halfway down the pit, where a gelatinous cube is lurking, and pressure plates on the edge of the pit activate a door on the ceiling which slides back to drop a gelatinous cube into the pit.
The fourth cube drops onto the other three, becoming contiguous with the floor, and anyone unfortunate enough to have been paralyzed, engulfed, or sent down the pit is stuckin a four-cube pileup.

Is this a bit much?
500%!

User avatar
TaintedDeity
Posts: 4003
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 7:22 pm UTC
Location: England;

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby TaintedDeity » Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:33 pm UTC

Sounds like it could cause definite death with no means of escape quite easily.
That's boring. It's meant to be fun.
If you want to keep in the conceept make some ingenious way the players can escape or what have you.
Ⓞⓞ◯

Klapaucius
Posts: 712
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:00 pm UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Klapaucius » Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:59 pm UTC

TaintedDeity wrote:Sounds like it could cause definite death with no means of escape quite easily.
That's boring. It's meant to be fun.
If you want to keep in the conceept make some ingenious way the players can escape or what have you.

I was thinking of making little nooks and whatnot which the players could hide from the cube in... but that would end up being a maze where, instead of dead ends, you have horrible, choking, crushing death.

Letting them clever their way out isn't much of an option, because my party will almost definitely not find the prescribed exits and will either find a way out that I never considered (in other words, the druid will cast a spell) or they'll walk right into it and die without any resistance.
500%!

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:26 am UTC

Klapaucius wrote:
TaintedDeity wrote:Sounds like it could cause definite death with no means of escape quite easily.
That's boring. It's meant to be fun.
If you want to keep in the conceept make some ingenious way the players can escape or what have you.

I was thinking of making little nooks and whatnot which the players could hide from the cube in... but that would end up being a maze where, instead of dead ends, you have horrible, choking, crushing death.

Letting them clever their way out isn't much of an option, because my party will almost definitely not find the prescribed exits and will either find a way out that I never considered (in other words, the druid will cast a spell) or they'll walk right into it and die without any resistance.

Gelatinous Cubes are fun in moderation but use them wisely. Nobody likes being digested at every turn, and if your players feel like the situation is hopeless they'll simply decide they don't care about their characters in order to avoid being unhappy about their fate and presto!: your game is dissolved! (ba-dum-ching)

Bottom line: elaborate traps are a cool alternative to monster slaying, but nigh-unescapable deathtraps don't make for good gaming unless you happen to be a fan of the SAW movies and your players are complete masochists.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26508
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby SecondTalon » Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:54 am UTC

If there's cracks large enough for a Half-Orc to squeeze through that are covered in mosses and lichen and such while the corridors themselves are completely bare, that's a decent enough warning (aside from the door slamming shut) that danger is afoot.

I'd also make one of the cracks be the escape route, opening to a natural cavern system blah blah blah fight underground monsters on your way out sort of thing. I mean, I'm assuming this is part of a manufactured dungeon or adapted cave, not a natural cave that just happens to have a slamming gate trap completely out of left field.

halbarad wrote:tl;dr - Suggest cool character ideas for a D&D game across the planes of existence.

Lizardfolk Monk. Goblin Cleric who follows some ridiculous sounding Deity (John the One-Fisted) if you want to be the comedy relief. Wererat Paladin, if you can talk your DM into swapping one of the Wererat hit die for your first class level. Hobgoblin Wizard.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
The Utilitarian
Posts: 935
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2009 6:26 am UTC
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby The Utilitarian » Thu Jan 21, 2010 4:11 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:If there's cracks large enough for a Half-Orc to squeeze through that are covered in mosses and lichen and such while the corridors themselves are completely bare, that's a decent enough warning (aside from the door slamming shut) that danger is afoot.

Ooh that would certainly be a good, clear hint as to the solution without breaking the feel of the scene. Very creative and slick. Nice one.
Watch your back, shoot straight, conserve ammo, and never, EVER cut a deal with a dragon.
Valar morghulis; valar dohaeris.

User avatar
Decker
Posts: 2071
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 4:22 pm UTC
Location: Western N.Y.

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Decker » Thu Jan 21, 2010 2:42 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:
halbarad wrote:tl;dr - Suggest cool character ideas for a D&D game across the planes of existence.

Lizardfolk Monk. Goblin Cleric who follows some ridiculous sounding Deity (John the One-Fisted) if you want to be the comedy relief. Wererat Paladin, if you can talk your DM into swapping one of the Wererat hit die for your first class level. Hobgoblin Wizard.

Half dragons are always fun if you can put up with the brutal level penalty.
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26508
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Jan 22, 2010 1:45 am UTC

It's only a +3, so one could be a Hobgoblin Half-Dragon and be right at the +4 maximum.


....


Hobgoblin Half-Dragon Bard.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
Decker
Posts: 2071
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 4:22 pm UTC
Location: Western N.Y.

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Decker » Fri Jan 22, 2010 2:46 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:It's only a +3, so one could be a Hobgoblin Half-Dragon and be right at the +4 maximum.


....


Hobgoblin Half-Dragon Bard.

Now I know what I'm going to be next time I play this.

It's brutal for the first few levels though.
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

Klapaucius
Posts: 712
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2008 11:00 pm UTC

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby Klapaucius » Fri Jan 22, 2010 4:56 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:If there's cracks large enough for a Half-Orc to squeeze through that are covered in mosses and lichen and such while the corridors themselves are completely bare, that's a decent enough warning (aside from the door slamming shut) that danger is afoot.

I'd also make one of the cracks be the escape route, opening to a natural cavern system blah blah blah fight underground monsters on your way out sort of thing. I mean, I'm assuming this is part of a manufactured dungeon or adapted cave, not a natural cave that just happens to have a slamming gate trap completely out of left field.
It's part of a natural cave adapted for use by Count Gregby, an amoral dandy who wields a bronzed hammerhead shark and bleeds shotgun shells.

While I'm thinking cubically, would it be too ridiculous to make an exception in the lycanthropic disease restriction and make the party encounter a werecube? It would be a normal Gelatinous Cube, since a hybrid cubeman would be much too awkward (even with the gelatinous template at my disposal). I just like the idea of the PCs running into a party of orcs trying to keep a GC imprisoned, only to escape, and if it dies, its jelly corpse shrinks into that of an orc.

While I'm discussing random tangents, what are some shenanigan-filled multiclassing opportunities? I'm strongly considering a rogue/paladin who can Sneak Smite.
500%!

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26508
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Dungeons and Dragons (and other tabletop RPGs)

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Jan 22, 2010 6:14 pm UTC

Just keep in mind that you'd have to get all the rogue levels out of the way before you started taking any Paladin ones, due to the whole multiclass rule thingy.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.


Return to “Gaming”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 21 guests