Interstellar

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Izawwlgood
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Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:05 am UTC

This was the most profound and perfect film I've seen in years.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby charliepanayi » Tue Nov 11, 2014 8:28 am UTC

In short, good but not great.

Spoiler:
Oddly my main worry (that the film would be too long) didn't really come to pass, it didn't feel like the best part of three hours anyway. And I know there's been plenty of analysis of plot holes and the science involved etc, but I didn't really notice or care about that either. It still felt like there was something missing though. There are moments of genuine wonder there but they often feel too fleeting. Fine acting all round, but Jessica Chastain was given far too little to do, aside from the moving scene where Coop watches two decades worth of messages (easily the best part of the film). The robots were pretty funny and cool, which was a pleasant surprise. But even by Hans Zimmer standards the score was constantly laid on with a trowel. And how many times did we have to hear that bloody Dylan Thomas poem? A colleague of mine (who also enjoyed it with reservations) said it felt like two scripts which had been mashed together, which I believe is the case.


I'd like to give it a re-watch in 70mm/IMAX.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Tue Nov 11, 2014 9:04 am UTC

I laughed, I cried, I dreamt about relativity. I started watching the movie 12 hours ago, my mind is still trying to get over it.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Chen » Tue Nov 11, 2014 12:55 pm UTC

It was pretty good. The pacing needed some work. We had some long drags at the beginning and then BOOM, finds SNASA, next day off on an interstellar voyage. Hell just a caption saying something like "a month later" or such would have been useful there (and in the part where they're travelling to Saturn for 2 years). The movie did a good job of using science (real and fictional) to move the plot along. While watching it there weren't too many plot holes you really felt (more fridge logic later). The whole last 45 minutes or so clearly felt like a 2001: A Space Odyssey homage, but it was pulled off pretty well IMO. Also near the end I started feeling the almost 3 hour run time, but it wasn't obnoxiously long or anything. I also saw it in Imax which was quite beautiful. A lot of scenes (~1 hour from what I read) were apparently shot in Imax which is quite a lot for any regular movie. Overall a pretty good movie IMO.

Some notes and nitpicks that need a spoiler
Spoiler:
- Matt Damon's planet part was a little pointless. There didn't need to be the standard "guy stuck away from humanity for long times goes crazy to sabotage the mission" part. The scene with Endurance getting torn apart and them docking with it was neat though.
- The time dilation on the first planet really is a neat concept (and needed to put the movie in the right place, time wise for the daughter and stuff) but it makes zero sense from a reality point of view. The gravity effect of the black hole would need to be so strong to cause a 1 hour: 7 year time dilation that the planet couldn't survive, let alone people going to it. And why didn't our crew of brilliant scientists realize "hmm she's been sending back messages for a couple of years...wouldn't that mean she's only been down there for a couple minutes?"
- The blight seemed like a kinda silly way to force them off the earth. We can already make hermetically sealed greenhouses, let alone the new technological advances we're seeing with growing crops inside buildings using just LED lights. I find it hard to believe we'd have to revert to giant farming fields. This is made even worse at the end when you see the space station full of huge crop fields to feed people with. You know a space station is going to be completely airtight. Why the hell didn't they just make that station on earth and use those to feed people? Forget needing to reconcile quantum mechanics with gravity to make the space ship launch. You have a huge sealed building you can use to grow food right there.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Tue Nov 11, 2014 1:00 pm UTC

I was pretty glad not to have "one month later" and that kinda stuff.

We knew it'd take time between him leaving his family and the launch.
Also, the direct snap from the car driving away to him being in the rocket shows the dramatic change that's about to occur.

We were explicitly told how long it'd take to get to Saturn.
There was no need to display it on the screen, it would have made the whole thing less immersive.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Nov 11, 2014 1:14 pm UTC

After sleeping on it, I have a few criticisms but feel that overall the film was excellent, Space Odyssey 2001 excellent.

Spoiler:
Obviously they should have scanned the planets before landing on them, which would have told them all kinds of useful things about them, like, say, that they've got plantetary wide tidal waves or are nearly frozen solid.

They hinted that 'repopulating the Earth' was important, but also that there was a resource shortage. I'd have liked to see perhaps what non-Ohio was up do, as the world should be a pretty big place.

I thought the humans were hanging out by Saturn to go through the wormhole, but Nolan in an interview said the wormhole was closed. Which makes no sense, and even less when you factor Matty M heading out on the little ranger to find Anne Hathaway.

I also felt Cooper senior waking up on the ringworld like ship had the potential for amazing, but instead was just a couple of minutes of silly walking around, him drinking a beer on his porch, and then oh yeah REUNITING WITH HIS NOW ANCIENT DAUGHTER for a split second before she's like 'Now go, we got shit to talk about'.

Matt Damons sequence felt a little unnecessary, as the trope of 'human selfishness jeopardizes mission' is a little played out, but at the very least they had his character making the case for altruism trumping biology. Irony.

So. Some stuff could have been handled a bit smoother, I felt, but overall I enjoyed it immensely, and felt it did a phenomenal job underscoring what it means to be human, with our flaws and our aspirations and our bonds.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Chen » Tue Nov 11, 2014 2:49 pm UTC

roband wrote:We knew it'd take time between him leaving his family and the launch.
Also, the direct snap from the car driving away to him being in the rocket shows the dramatic change that's about to occur.


Frankly I have no idea how long it took between him finding the facility and leaving on the ship. The movie makes it seem super fast. I mean he only tried once to get his daughter to understand? If it was a long time period you figure he'd try again. It really felt like a day or two at most. Not to mention the eagerness of the the scientists there to throw him in as the pilot despite him being a farmer for god knows how many years prior. I mean why didn't the old dude just call him up and tell him what was going on. Why wait until he accidentally stumbles on the place.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby pseudoidiot » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:06 pm UTC

I agree that it did seem super fast. But whatever, it's a movie. Some amount of time passed, it wasn't terribly germane to the plot how long it was.

I didn't have a problem with their eagerness. They straight up said he was the best pilot they ever had. Maybe brush up in a simulator or something (I imagine they had something for training the other pilots) and he'd probably get up to speed pretty quickly.

I got the feeling from the movie that a good chunk of infrastructure was no longer around, so tracking people down was probably not feasible. I think Michael Caine's character even said something like "we didn't know you were still alive". And, anyhow, they weren't waiting on him to stumble on the place, they were getting ready to launch regardless.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Nov 11, 2014 3:23 pm UTC

Also the dream squence he has in the beginning is of him piloting one of the rangers. My sense was he was the original pilot for this vessel before NASA was grounded. Curiously, when he entered the black hole, it was an almost identical flight sequence of him ejecting, so, maybe his dream was a premonition and not a recollection.

I thought the dichotomy between the siblings was well done.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby infernovia » Tue Nov 11, 2014 4:07 pm UTC

This will probably go down as a sci-fi masterpiece, and it's well deserved too. The black hole looked amazing, the visuals were stunning, the planets and it's environments were both bordered on sensible, majestic, and undeniably strange without going into pure fiction. The grandiosity of the film is undeniable, as this is what Nolan is the best at, and even the overly bombastic soundtrack couldn't stop my breath from getting taken away.

That said, it still has all of Nolan's faults. Nolan is terrible at handling emotions and there weren't a lot of moments that emotionally resonated with me, even though he was trying really hard to do that. The ending just didn't have any emotional payoff, as was mentioned above. On top of that, there was some mystical crap that should have been left in the garbage. Regardless, I still really enjoyed the movie for the novel environments alone.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Tue Nov 11, 2014 7:29 pm UTC

You didn't get emotional? I got SO emotional.

I wasn't lying in my post that said "I laughed, I cried"

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Nov 11, 2014 7:40 pm UTC

I thought the emotional appeals did a good job from a number of different angles, actually. Even if you are... I dunno, utterly numb to the struggle of a father trying to get back to his children, or a person getting back to the one they love, or a man being afraid of dying alone, or a man being afraid of emptiness... I mean... the survival of the human race?

I'm surprised you didn't find there to be much an emotional payout at the end of this film, given the resolutions of each of those angles.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Tue Nov 11, 2014 11:03 pm UTC

Or the sheer beauty of some of the shots.
Or the thought of aging at a slower rate than your children.
Or the thought that you can communicate with someone you'd given up all hope of ever seeing again...

The list goes on.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Zohar » Wed Nov 12, 2014 4:07 am UTC

I really liked the movie. The visuals were stunning, the sound department should win ALL THE OSCARS. I thought the science was generally good (not excellent but good), the fiction was OK, and the emotional stories were generally well done.

I think my biggest caveat is that I didn't feel awed. I feel a lot more "Oh me yarm SPAAAAACE THIS IS INSPIRING I WANT TO GO THERE!!!" watching some documentaries or educational series (I seriously teared up during an episode of Cosmos) and that just didn't happen here. It's like the people on the ship were all "meh" about landing on alien planets (except for the emotional woman who keeps crying while the men are logical machines).
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Nath » Wed Nov 12, 2014 8:43 am UTC

I'm pretty sure most of the crying in this movie was done by Matthew McConaughey. And child Anne Hathaway, I guess. Come to think of it, all four main characters cried at least once, I think.

I felt reasonably awed. The countdown, the wormhole, the tidal wave. This movie had what the Abrams Star Treks have been missing.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Wed Nov 12, 2014 9:17 am UTC

Child Anne Hathaway? I think you're confused.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:08 pm UTC

I have a question about the time line and such;

Interview with Nolan says that the wormhole is gone at the end of the film, which makes Cooper setting out to find Brand in that ranger... an impossibility... Unless the ranger has been upgraded with some FTL? I prefer to imagine the wormhole is still there and he just has to hop over and hang out with her.

But... what was the O'Neill ship/station doing out there by Saturn? Just waiting for his return? Just one of the many stations in the human space armada?

And about that; we know that Murph figured out the gravity formula and was able to launch people all over the solar system, so should we assume that humanity has been rescued now? That they're expanding all over the cosmos?

I suppose if you can manipulate gravity, you can... do a lot of things. Corn blight be damned.

Also;
Did I miss something about the new colonies 'Plan B' including some sort of artificial incubators, or is Anne Hathaway going to have a very exhausted uterus in the next 50 some odd years?
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Re: Interstellar

Postby infernovia » Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:25 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:Did I miss something about the new colonies 'Plan B' including some sort of artificial incubators, or is Anne Hathaway going to have a very exhausted uterus in the next 50 some odd years
There is supposed to be an artificial incubator. They mentioned they were supposed to do 10 in one generation, 100 in the next etc. It would be really difficult if you just had to rely on one crew member's survival for that plan to work...

Izawwlgood wrote:Interview with Nolan says that the wormhole is gone at the end of the film, which makes Cooper setting out to find Brand in that ranger... an impossibility... Unless the ranger has been upgraded with some FTL? I prefer to imagine the wormhole is still there and he just has to hop over and hang out with her.

Yeah, same.

roband wrote:You didn't get emotional? I got SO emotional.

I wasn't lying in my post that said "I laughed, I cried"

I didn't, or more accurately, I didn't feel like I got emotional enough. A movie very similar to this that I thought was much better with emotions was Edge of Tomorrow. The wide range of emotions portrayed in the film helped me feel attached to the main character, especially as it gets to the middle. And his sense of loss, his fear, everything was heightened to a higher level for me. Mathew McConaughey's cries in The Counsler affected me a lot more than in Interstellar. The sense of loss and the desire to fix it, is of course, very pervasive throughout Interstellar, and that is portrayed well. But more than that, it's the attachment between the characters, the chemistry, the humor, the emotional payoff that matters. And Nolan is not very good with that, and historically, he never has been.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:55 pm UTC

infernovia wrote:A movie very similar to this that I thought was much better with emotions was Edge of Tomorrow.
Hahahaha, wat? Edge of Tomorrow was an enjoyable movie, but there were two emotions conveyed; "frustration because I keep having to do this seemingly futile thing" and "Gurl, I've totally got a soft spot for you".

infernovia wrote:here is supposed to be an artificial incubator. They mentioned they were supposed to do 10 in one generation, 100 in the next etc. It would be really difficult if you just had to rely on one crew member's survival for that plan to work...
Oh right, I remember that now. Without that, it certainly seems like sending a woman is actually quite insidious.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby infernovia » Wed Nov 12, 2014 3:59 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:Hahahaha, wat? Edge of Tomorrow was an enjoyable movie, but there were two emotions conveyed; "frustration because I keep having to do this seemingly futile thing" and "Gurl, I've totally got a soft spot for you".

That moment where they talk about the person she watched die a hundred times was very well done. Both the desire to help, and understanding that he couldn't do it. It was a well done scene. Affected me a lot more than pretty much any moment in Interstellar. I build a sort of callousness to sadness after a while *shrugs*. EoT had a much nicer balance which made me more attached to the characters.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Wed Nov 12, 2014 4:11 pm UTC

infernovia wrote:
roband wrote:You didn't get emotional? I got SO emotional.

I wasn't lying in my post that said "I laughed, I cried"

I didn't, or more accurately, I didn't feel like I got emotional enough. A movie very similar to this that I thought was much better with emotions was Edge of Tomorrow. The wide range of emotions portrayed in the film helped me feel attached to the main character, especially as it gets to the middle. And his sense of loss, his fear, everything was heightened to a higher level for me. Mathew McConaughey's cries in The Counsler affected me a lot more than in Interstellar. The sense of loss and the desire to fix it, is of course, very pervasive throughout Interstellar, and that is portrayed well. But more than that, it's the attachment between the characters, the chemistry, the humor, the emotional payoff that matters. And Nolan is not very good with that, and historically, he never has been.

I disagree, pretty massively, but you have your own views.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed Nov 12, 2014 4:18 pm UTC

infernovia wrote:
Izawwlgood wrote:Hahahaha, wat? Edge of Tomorrow was an enjoyable movie, but there were two emotions conveyed; "frustration because I keep having to do this seemingly futile thing" and "Gurl, I've totally got a soft spot for you".

That moment where they talk about the person she watched die a hundred times was very well done. Both the desire to help, and understanding that he couldn't do it. It was a well done scene. Affected me a lot more than pretty much any moment in Interstellar. I build a sort of callousness to sadness after a while *shrugs*. EoT had a much nicer balance which made me more attached to the characters.
I mean, opinions are opinions, but if you didn't feel that Cooper watching 20 odd years of his children sending messages to him and losing hope that he was coming back wasn't emotional, I don't know what to tell you.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby infernovia » Wed Nov 12, 2014 4:35 pm UTC

That was one of the scenes that worked (I did say some scenes did work for me). But I am judging the movie as a whole, not a specific part.

And like I said, both Edge of Tomorrow and The Counsler affected me more, emotionally anyway. Good thing Interstellar reaches beyond that.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Nath » Thu Nov 13, 2014 3:18 am UTC

roband wrote:Child Anne Hathaway? I think you're confused.


Er, yeah, I meant child Jessica Chastain. Little Murph.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby roband » Thu Nov 13, 2014 8:53 am UTC

Just a thought -
Spoiler:
once Michael Caine died and Murphy discovered he was lying and then worked out the actual formula with her dad's help - did the new gravity equation become known as "Murphy's Law"?

Because that'd be nice.


edit: messed the spoiler up

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Diadem » Thu Nov 13, 2014 10:01 am UTC

My feelings about this movie are quite mixed. But mixed in a strange way. I thought it was absolutely awesome, but still somehow I was left unsatisfied by it.

I can't put my finger on it. The movie was absolutely awesome. The acting was very good, the special effects looked stunning. The story was a bit light, but entertaining enough, and they got so much of the science right I was almost weeping with joy. Some parts were even funny. Yet somehow I can't shake the feeling that something was missing.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Chen » Thu Nov 13, 2014 12:59 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:I have a question about the time line and such;

Interview with Nolan says that the wormhole is gone at the end of the film, which makes Cooper setting out to find Brand in that ranger... an impossibility... Unless the ranger has been upgraded with some FTL? I prefer to imagine the wormhole is still there and he just has to hop over and hang out with her.

But... what was the O'Neill ship/station doing out there by Saturn? Just waiting for his return? Just one of the many stations in the human space armada?



There are clearly other stations around since they mentioned old Murph making the longish trip to see Coop. It also kinda implies there's no FTL or instant travel, at least within the solar system. So him leaving if the wormhole is gone is kinda pointless. That said the implication of the wormhole NOT being gone would be that everyone has just been a jerk to poor Anne Hathaway and left her on that planet alone when they could have gotten there pretty quickly.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Thu Nov 13, 2014 1:06 pm UTC

Assuming him entering the black hole (tesseract?) didn't add additional time dilation (heh, sure why not), then he showed up outside the O'Neill ship right around when Anne Hathaway was setting up the colony.

But yeah, that still doesn't answer why as soon as they picked up him, they didn't send a probe or a shuttle to her to be like 'Yo! Shits cool! Comon home!'
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Diadem » Thu Nov 13, 2014 1:27 pm UTC

Regarding the ending

Spoiler:
Yeah, I think Brand was just arriving at the 3rd planet when they picked up Cooper. The time dilatation they experienced was due to the black hole fly be, so it makes sense that they experienced mostly the same dilatation (Well, actually, Cooper fell in, which should have taken a near infinite outside time, but let's not go there). So Brand experienced perhaps slightly more time, just enough to fly to this 3rd planet and set up a rudimentary base there, which is what we saw. Meanwhile for everybody else a lot of time passed.

They might not have known she was alive until after he told them. I mean, they sent out this mission decades ago, and never heard of them again. They probably assumed it was lost with all hands. Then they finished this magical 'make everything right' equation and build these giant space habitats. So the mission was no longer critical, and its failure (from their point of view) became irrelevant.

Fridge logic: It's even possible that after they got their act together they send out probes or other spacecraft to see what had happened. These however would have arrived BEFORE Cooper and Brand, so they wouldn't have found them.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Thu Nov 13, 2014 3:21 pm UTC

Ah, good points.

Spoiler:
My sense was that for the people on Earth, when Murph was in her 40's, so a bit after Michael Caine died, she got the signal from the watch. She knew it was from her father, but doesn't know WHEN he is, but that's sort of moot to the rest of the world. She solves the equation, and the next... uh... 40? years... are magical happy new technology time for humanity. We get off planet. We get, at the very least, all over the solar system, and easily enough that we haven't learned to stop playing baseball in a cylindrical station.

The people went sent into the wormhole never return, or signal back, so everyone assumes they're lost. Murph knows with the power of love that her dad is still alive.

Suddenly, Cooper shows up near the wormhole (or where the wormhole used to be) and they pick him up. Right around this time, a new colony is being established by Anne Hathaway.

Right?


I mention all this only because I find the timeline a bit confusing, though, I think it's sort of irrelevant. The crux of the story I felt was beautiful. There's some line Cooper has really early on, after that HORRIBLY FRUSTRATING monolog the teacher has in the school (FUCK!), where he goes something like "We used to look to the sky and wonder about tomorrow. Now all we do is look to the dirt and wonder about today. We forgot what it was to be human."

I think there's a few plot holes to contend with about the logistics of wormhole travel (understatement), but ultimately, for the story, they're fairly irrelevant. The story is about us remembering who we are, and setting the stage for the next big exploration of humanity thanks to the bravery and daring of a few. I give underground NASA a lot of props; they're sitting on a research base in the virtual apocalypse, and instead of building up resources for themselves, are gambling on maximum payoff missions.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby UniqueScreenname » Thu Nov 13, 2014 10:58 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:My feelings about this movie are quite mixed. But mixed in a strange way. I thought it was absolutely awesome, but still somehow I was left unsatisfied by it.

I can't put my finger on it. The movie was absolutely awesome. The acting was very good, the special effects looked stunning. The story was a bit light, but entertaining enough, and they got so much of the science right I was almost weeping with joy. Some parts were even funny. Yet somehow I can't shake the feeling that something was missing.

I feel just like this. At the end of the movie, I knew it was better than the majority of movies I've seen, but I wasn't satisfied. My best guess is that it was the pacing. The ending just felt unresolved, even though I liked that it wasn't a neat, tidy, and unrealistic. I think if there had just been one line or scene that gave us an idea of what Cooper was heading into, I would have been happy. However, Nolan certainly likes leaving his movies unresolved, so I should have seen that coming.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Prefanity » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:44 am UTC

Of all the things that bugged me about the movie (and there were a few), there are two in particular that I can't shake.
Spoiler:
First, why did the future humans set up a spacetime backdoor in Gargantua? Was it just so that Coop could fulfill whatever the needed requirement was for the future humans to exist? Second, what on earth was the equation supposed to solve? I feel like some of this stuff could be resolved through a second watch, but knowing Nolan, I have a feeling some of my concerns are due to problems in the script and not in my memory.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:32 pm UTC

Spoiler:
It seems the entire voyage was aimed at getting the past humans data from the 'naked singularity', not actually setting up a home around Gargantua. The data was supposed to allow gravity control.

I agree, it's definitely one of those kind of silly motives. I did enjoy seeing that it was Cooper all along, and felt they pulled that off reasonably well, but for super advanced post humans/wizard behind the curtain, they sure picked a strange way of getting us there.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Tyndmyr » Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:13 pm UTC

Chen wrote:
roband wrote:We knew it'd take time between him leaving his family and the launch.
Also, the direct snap from the car driving away to him being in the rocket shows the dramatic change that's about to occur.


Frankly I have no idea how long it took between him finding the facility and leaving on the ship. The movie makes it seem super fast. I mean he only tried once to get his daughter to understand? If it was a long time period you figure he'd try again. It really felt like a day or two at most. Not to mention the eagerness of the the scientists there to throw him in as the pilot despite him being a farmer for god knows how many years prior. I mean why didn't the old dude just call him up and tell him what was going on. Why wait until he accidentally stumbles on the place.


I started outright laughing when he tried to console his daughter with "just think, by the time I come back, you and I could be the same age". Seriously, who thinks that will help?

Now, it's an excellent movie, and should be seen, but there were a few bits that bothered me. #1, I watched it in Imax, and every engine firing sequence was so goddamned loud that most of the audience, myself included, had to cover our ears. That's...kind of crazy. I've never had that complaint about a movie before, but this was ludicrous.

On to the list of bits what annoyed me:

1. The ship can't send messages back to earth, but the pods can? And they don't use this immediately after finding a good pod? Gah.
2. Nobody noticed a distortion of signal from a 1hr:7yr timeshift? Seriously?
3. I am not a rocket scientist. I immediately noted that a timeshift of this magnitude makes the planet worthless, and the data garbage. A ship full of scientists talking about relativity should also notice this, or at least talk about it.
4. The "hover above the planet instead of orbiting it" plan that "burns a little bit more fuel" is kind of insane for 27 years. Like seriously, if they had that much fuel, why were they ever concerned about order? There is no way this makes sense.
5. Why the hell didn't woman who wants to pick up her boyfriend want to do that before going to time dilation planet, and not, yknow, after he's dead? Was this just so they could mash in love as the justification for the whole black whole thing? Yes? Ugggh....
6. The "it was me all along" doesn't answer the existance of the tesseract itself or the wormhole. Or the gravity issues all over earth. What the hell are those? Also communication? From who? If from "them", why the hell is this all about our man here?

Edit: Timeline doesn't bother me. Obviously, given the age of Murph, another significant timeskip happened to the surviving astronaughts as they slingshotted around/fell into Gargantua. Obviously, not as long as it should be for "fall in", but meh.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Prefanity » Fri Nov 14, 2014 9:00 pm UTC

Tyndmyr wrote:Timeline doesn't bother me. Obviously, given the age of Murph, another significant timeskip happened to the surviving astronaughts as they slingshotted around/fell into Gargantua. Obviously, not as long as it should be for "fall in", but meh.


I had assumed the future humans simply deposited Coop at/during a convenient spacetime after he had spent damn near an eternity falling into Gargantua.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Fri Nov 14, 2014 9:03 pm UTC

I think they were dropping him where he would have been along the time line.

Which I suppose is suggesting that 'gravity waves' can manipulate things throughout time and space, but you can't send someone through time and space. I.e., he can fiddle with the watch 60 years ago and knock books off a shelf to distract his past self, but he can't himself get sent into that time?

Spacemagic.

And yeah, Tyn, all your points.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Mother Superior » Sat Nov 15, 2014 10:34 pm UTC

Spoiler:
1. Their spaceships were AMAZING! ...why did they need a Saturn V booster to get off Earth? They had shuttles that could reach orbit and then some from worlds with 1.3g.
2. "I can slingshot around that neutron star." - You're not a real astronaut.
3. They found a solar system with a black hole, a neutron star, a regular star, and three habitable(ish) worlds? Wow.
4. Approximately five seconds after breaking orbit they are falling towards the black hole. How small is this solar system? More importantly, how could they not realize that a solar system with two worlds this close to a black hole has not got very much time left.
5. Why didn't they just build lots of small-ish space stations, rather than wait 23+ years for someone to crack the anti-grav equation and send up a couple of really big ones? With their clearly awe-inspiring heavy lifting capacity, that would have been a far better option.
6. How did building those O'Neill Cylinders fix anything? Wouldn't those stations have far more fragile eco systems and require enormous amount of ground-support from an Earth whose resources are stretched to the breaking point already, just to get things going? I mean, getting them up there is undoubtedly the really difficult part, but it's not like that would instantly make everything okay. Also, how fast would an O'Neill cyliner that small have to spin to generate 1g or near-equivalent? Do we have the materials to build something that big that spins that fast that doesn't spin apart? I mean, I know it's the future, but...


This is me bitching. The movie was flawed, with lots of stupid ideas that took me out of it, but overall it was good, it was moving at times, it was exciting, had some amazing sequences and some genuinely interesting sci-fi plots that I haven't seen much of from TV or films. 4/5.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Zohar » Sun Nov 16, 2014 2:06 am UTC

Regarding point 6:
Spoiler:
Once you can control gravity you might not have to spin, or spin very fast, to generate 1g. And I'm guessing those space stations harvest asteroids.
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Re: Interstellar

Postby Nath » Sun Nov 16, 2014 3:38 am UTC

Point 3:
Spoiler:
They didn't just stumble upon it through good luck. The future humans/wormhole aliens/'they' presumably picked that system as one of the endpoints of the wormhole, specifically because it had habitable worlds.


Point 4:
Spoiler:
'Not very much time' on an astronomical scale is probably still tens of thousands of years.

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Re: Interstellar

Postby Izawwlgood » Sun Nov 16, 2014 4:13 am UTC

Spoiler:
Nath wrote:They didn't just stumble upon it through good luck. The future humans/wormhole aliens/'they' presumably picked that system as one of the endpoints of the wormhole, specifically because it had habitable worlds.


Spoiler:
I'm not so sure, since the tesseract was designed around Murphs childhood bedroom, which means the post-humans wanted them to come not to any of the planets, but into the blackhole to send the message of the gravity data.

Plan B was never part of the post humans plans.
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