Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

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Postby Azrael » Wed May 23, 2007 1:32 pm UTC

davef wrote:... Like a cellmate Andy had for ten years, for instance...


And the fact that Red is named Red because he's a red haired Irishman? Although, honestly, I think that casting Morgan for that role might be the single best example of a movie taking liberties with a book and getting it right.

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Postby ArchangelShrike » Wed May 23, 2007 11:03 pm UTC

When I think of novelization I think of a movie that's been turned into a book, not a movie that was based off of a book. In that sense, I can't say I've read any good novelizations because I believe that whatever the work was originally produced as is generally the best form, being closest to the artists orginal view. And for the most part, I haven't found any conversion that is nearly as good as the orginal (book, movie, game) except for the movies "Whalerider" and "Clue." Because "Clue" is really just a filmed RP of the game, and "Whalerider" because the book takes it too far past realistic.

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Postby Belial » Wed May 23, 2007 11:30 pm UTC

ArchangelShrike wrote:When I think of novelization I think of a movie that's been turned into a book, not a movie that was based off of a book. In that sense, I can't say I've read any good novelizations because I believe that whatever the work was originally produced as is generally the best form, being closest to the artists orginal view.


Neverwhere is actually a good example of an exception to this rule. It was originally a BBC miniseries, but the artist felt that, in making the miniseries, he was too constrained by the network, his budget, and the time alloted to tell the story the way *he* wanted to tell it. So he wrote it up afterwards as a book.

The book was better. For serious.
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Postby ArchangelShrike » Thu May 24, 2007 1:16 am UTC

That may be true, but I've never read Neverwhere, so I can't comment on it.

Edit: Also, the original creator was still working on the same project, as opposed to say someone like Quentin Tarantino or Steven Spielberg deciding that the movie wasn't good enough so he'll write a book. It sounds as if the creator of the mini-series was originally the writer for it, and so it would be much easier for him to get everything the way he wanted (and therefore better/perfect) as opposed to a author watching a movie, reading the script and then writing a novelization. But that's just me.

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Postby Dibley » Thu Jul 19, 2007 5:50 am UTC

Am I the only one to think that showing them Matrix wouldn't be especially good (other than effects)? It fucks with your head, but without having a good concept of what a computer is and what it does (kind of a weird concept), they just wouldn't get it.

I would go for casual and subtle special effects (like some of the more surreal bits in Amelie), as well as examples of major changes in societal norms (any of the American Pie series). I personally think video games would freak them out more than movies.

As for Ender's Game, I think it will suck because of the youth of the actors. If they stay true to book ages, the actors will A. probably suck. There aren't many good child actors. B. not be appropriately mature. Half the point of the book was that these were children who, in many ways, were more adult than the average adult. C. not be nearly violent enough. Have fun getting real 6-year olds to show nearly the level of brutality necessary. If they change it so that the children are older, it might be feasible to pull off A and C, but for obvious reasons they would miss B.

Also, it just doesn't seem like the kind of book that would end up being a good movie.

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Postby Rodan » Thu Jul 19, 2007 1:53 pm UTC

Show the 50's directors Pan's Labyrinth. I'd be curious to see how they'd react to some of the monsters...

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Postby J Spade » Sat Aug 11, 2007 12:31 am UTC

Day After Tomorrow.

I'd tell him it was a documentary for laughs.

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Postby GMontag » Sun Aug 12, 2007 8:47 am UTC

xkcd wrote:Now, can anyone name a case where the novelization was better than the movie? I mean, I know I read the Three Ninjas Kick Back novelization more than once.


I was going to say Hackers, then I saw that Jauss beat me to it. I thought I was the only person in the world who actually read that book.

Anyway, as an alternative, (and I know I'll be booed off the stage for this) I will say 2001.

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Postby German Sausage » Sun Aug 12, 2007 10:41 am UTC

can we have that shootout soon?
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Postby clockworkmonk » Sun Aug 12, 2007 1:54 pm UTC

lets see, El Mariachi, to show the top of low-budget movies.
The Princess Bride, while the effects are not great, the story is delightful.

and just for the hell of it, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.

extra credit.
1) the movie will be made, and if they do it right, the whole thing should be animated. Personally I would prefer traditional animation over computer, I feel it would better contrast the story to see it animated like Saturday morning cartoons. But definitely animated because where are you gonna find kids that young who can act? Even if this is done, they will still really screw it up.
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Postby semicolon » Sun Aug 12, 2007 6:27 pm UTC

Azrael wrote:I think that casting Morgan for that role might be the single best example of a movie taking liberties with a book and getting it right.

I always thought putting Singin' in the Rain in A Clockwork Orange was the best example of this. I saw the movie first, and when I went to read the book I was surprised it wasn't in the book. It might have been published before Singin' in the Rain came out though...

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Postby Torvaun » Tue Aug 14, 2007 5:26 am UTC

I know it isn't a movie, but in that episode of Heroes where Hiro is helping Ando cheat at poker. He stops time, then appears to physically interact with the cards that are still hanging in midair. I certainly watched that section multiple times before deciding on CGI.

Ender's Game will likely not actually be made into a movie. This is the best result you can hope for, although I will weigh in with a fix for the zero g problem. Allow the camera to indicate gravity, with people that are all basically oriented in the same way. Then have someone indicate 'down' as a direction other than what the watcher believes it to be. ::Raises arm above head and points.:: "Down there."

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Postby william » Tue Aug 14, 2007 3:26 pm UTC

SecondTalon wrote:1. Ender's Game as a movie? I hope they never do it. Why? Go read Starship Troopers. See what they did to that. Same thing. Only 10 year olds (played by 15 year olds) with machine guns.

The Starship Troopers movie was written by someone who didn't read the book. The Ender's Game movie is having its screenplay done by the author.
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Postby LoonRadio » Tue Aug 14, 2007 4:45 pm UTC

Double feature for Cecil B. Demille: Titanic to show that you can have a $200,000,000 budget and STILL make a lousy movie, and Closet Land to show you can make a good movie with only two people and a single room.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby sporkify » Sun Jun 08, 2008 8:29 am UTC

For films, perhaps the biggest example of CGI is Star Wars 3...Course, if you want to actually include plot in the film, you'd pick a different CGI film...

I'm gonna have to go against the several suggestions that Serenity be used. See, while Serenity is great, it's not exactly CGI-heavy. While it does include good amounts of CGI, I recall Whedon saying that he hated special effects that interrupted the plot. Serenity is a good example of how to use CGI effectively. It is not a massive wasteful demonstration of what happens when you vomit out computer editing while forgetting all plot. (that's why I suggest star wars) And, if you stop and think about it, the 50's guy would be too awestruck by the special effects to bother with things like plot.

Extra credit:
1. I'd say that they'll make it eventually. And I think there's a reasonable chance that they won't screw things up. Card wrote
"I jealously protected the movie rights to Ender's Game so that it would not be filmed until it could be done right. I knew what kind of movie it had to be, and I tried to keep it away from directors, writers, and studios who would try to turn it into the kind of movie they think of as "sci-fi.""
and, referring to Serenity,
"And I'll tell you this right now: If Ender's Game can't be this kind of movie, and this good a movie, then I want it never to be made.
I'd rather just watch Serenity again. "
(http://www.hatrack.com/osc/reviews/ever ... xtra.shtml)

I'd say that this gives some hope that the film won't be utter crap.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby H.E.L.e.N. » Sun Jun 08, 2008 8:39 pm UTC

Since people are still talking about the Ender's Game movie bit: I saw Orson Scott Card speak at New York Comic Con in April, and this is all taken directly from stuff he said. He had a director on board -- the guy who made Troy -- but didn't like that he was conceiving of it as a straight-up action movie. Warner Brothers loses the movie rights sometime over the summer, and Card said he already has another director lined up that he's *much* happier with, somebody who is thinking of it as a movie that could potentially win an Oscar -- but understandably he couldn't say who.

The reason the movie took so long in the first place -- and this is all contained in the author's end-notes on the full-length audiobook versions of Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow -- was to get a studio to agree to keep Ender the proper age/let the author keep a degree of creative control that he was happy with.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby dbsmith » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:08 am UTC

I always wanted to resurrect J.R.R Tolkien and show him LOTR.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby podbaydoor » Thu Jun 12, 2008 6:55 pm UTC

I can't believe Memento hasn't been mentioned yet. xkcd forums, you have failed.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby ishikiri » Fri Jun 13, 2008 12:46 pm UTC

I'd show the 50's directors Schindlers List.

Look at the reaction that film still gets.

Now imagine it happenning only a few years previously when everyone was still recovering from the war.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Gobo » Fri Jun 13, 2008 7:17 pm UTC

I'm thinking about films that could truly not be made in the old times. I don't think most directors would be that impressed by just effects, since they'd expect that things would become more sophisticated as time went on.

I would show

Unforgiven to John Ford and John Wayne. The Western is the earliest film genre and most of that genre (print and screen) had an oversimplified morality that we've mostly abandoned today. Ford, in his later films, was starting to get it. Wayne I don't think ever did and I'm sure he would hate the film.

The Matrix to DeMille... heck, just the Gap ad would be enough. Someone pointed out upthread that once you know how bullet-time is done it could be reproduced with Edison's equipment (and a crapload of money).

The Blair Witch Project to the old horror directors. "Hey look what we can do with small cameras."

Memento to Hitchcock. Narratively, it's like something he would do.

Jurassic Park to Ray Harryhausen, who is still alive and I'm sure saw the film when it came out, but I wonder what he would have thought if he'd seen it in his 20s.

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1. It will be made; it won't be good. The money will be good enough that OSC will sell Alvin Maker to be a TV series on PAX or ABC Family.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Surgery » Sun Jun 15, 2008 6:30 am UTC

Gobo wrote:Unforgiven to John Ford and John Wayne. The Western is the earliest film genre and most of that genre (print and screen) had an oversimplified morality that we've mostly abandoned today. Ford, in his later films, was starting to get it. Wayne I don't think ever did and I'm sure he would hate the film.


I agree that it would be interesting to see John Ford's reaction to Unforgiven, however, I disagree that John Wayne would hate the film because he never got past oversimplified morality. My case in point is The Searchers. So much of that movie is about violence only in the proper amount, and never too much. A triumph over moral simplicity for both Wayne and Ford.

Also
Ren wrote:I think the music from post-50s films would blow their minds.

Example: "A New Hope" was the first film to have separate themes for each character.

EDITED: Because I forgot some things.


um, Stagecoach?

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Babam » Sun Jun 15, 2008 8:03 am UTC

I cant believe no one has said Cloverfield, just tell him/her it was a documentary.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Dream » Sun Jun 15, 2008 12:34 pm UTC

Surgery wrote:
Gobo wrote:Unforgiven to John Ford and John Wayne. The Western is the earliest film genre and most of that genre (print and screen) had an oversimplified morality that we've mostly abandoned today. Ford, in his later films, was starting to get it. Wayne I don't think ever did and I'm sure he would hate the film.


I agree that it would be interesting to see John Ford's reaction to Unforgiven, however, I disagree that John Wayne would hate the film because he never got past oversimplified morality. My case in point is The Searchers. So much of that movie is about violence only in the proper amount, and never too much. A triumph over moral simplicity for both Wayne and Ford.

Ditto The Shootist. Does anyone know was that actually the last film James Stewart made? I'd heard it was, along with John Wayne's.

To everyone who is suggesting effects based movies as mind blowing. watch Metropolis, and pay attention to the effects and the future dystopian themes. And the pay attention to the copyright date. Fritz Land wouldn't be wowed by The Matrix, or its ilk. He'd most likely consider them simplistic morality tales that never really explore their themes, and would be merely impressed that film and projection standards had been raised. Mind blowing wouldn't enter into it, unless he started thinking about what he himself might do with the potential of the better technology.

Similarly, no action/drama movie could impress Buster Keaton, who would likely say of Titanic: "In my day we floated a real jail down a real river, and really acted while standing on it, because that's how you really do it. Faking things just looks fake, no matter how extravagant it is. Acting included." Gladiator would not impress those who made Ben Hur or Cleopatra. There is very little that has not been done before.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Mr. Mack » Sun Jun 15, 2008 4:53 pm UTC

Babamthegrunt wrote:I cant believe no one has said Cloverfield
Well, this is a revived thread, that movie wasn't out when this started.

I'd have to go with Adaptation, since I don't think a meta-movie is something an old director would be used to.

As far as special effects go, I'd have to say Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. That way they could appreciate the special effects in the course of a movie that they'd otherwise enjoy. Saving Private Ryan would also serve this purpose, since it too would feature a story they'd already understand.

Since cowboy movies were big back in the day, I'd show Brokeback Mountain. After all, the previous two movies were chosen because they'd be comfortable with the story, so a change would be in order. I'm kidding of course, romance is boring and drama is boring unless somebody's going insane.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby McCaber » Sun Jun 15, 2008 9:03 pm UTC

I think I have to mention The Departed here, and probably in the epic movie thread.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Torvaun » Sun Jun 15, 2008 9:46 pm UTC

McCaber wrote:I think I have to mention The Departed here, and probably in the epic movie thread.

Why? It's a good movie, but that's all from good plot and acting, things that they had back in the 50s, probably even more than they do today.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Surgery » Sun Jun 15, 2008 11:01 pm UTC

Forgot to mention:

somebody mentioned day after tomorrow because of it being a disaster movie. Well, La Fine du Monde was made well before the '50s, a french film about an asteroid hitting paris. There was also so movie about a terrorist attack on a (then fictional) tunnel under the english channel. Not arguing, just pointing out some interesting facts. There really is nothing new under the sun.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Gobo » Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:06 am UTC

Dream wrote:Similarly, no action/drama movie could impress Buster Keaton, who would likely say of Titanic: "In my day we floated a real jail down a real river, and really acted while standing on it, because that's how you really do it. Faking things just looks fake, no matter how extravagant it is. Acting included." Gladiator would not impress those who made Ben Hur or Cleopatra. There is very little that has not been done before.


I had a long-ass boring intro to my choices about this exact thing and then erased it for length (same examples even, along with 10 Commandments). You're right that most of the "mindblowing" things are just refinements of things that they've been doing all along. Buster Keaton's films has some incredibly elaborate shots. In The Cameraman he has this crane shot where he runs several times up and down a staircase between his apartment and the phone (the only phone is on the first floor). No special effects, but the set design and camerawork make it as god as CGI anyday.

And Gladiator shouldn't impress anyone at any time period. It was crap.

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Torvaun » Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:08 am UTC

Gobo wrote:I had a long ass-boring

I don't want to know.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Gobo » Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:14 am UTC

Torvaun wrote:
Gobo wrote:I had a long ass-boring

I don't want to know.


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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby headprogrammingczar » Mon Jun 16, 2008 3:32 am UTC

Take Pan's Labyrinth to Europe. It starts out ordinary, except for the bug-shot, which could be written off as a byproduct of the future. Then it just gets crazy, but all still built around a powerful story.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby bigglesworth » Mon Jun 16, 2008 1:21 pm UTC

I guess iMax has already been mentioned? Because that is the height of effects.

Did they have the red-blue 3D glasses in the 50s?
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby sir_schwick » Tue Jun 17, 2008 2:41 pm UTC

Reservoir Dogs is certainly a good candidate. It is a reinterpretation of an Akira Kurosawa film, forgot which one. However the style would inspire so many directors of any generation.

Side Question: What would have Kubrik's reaction been to Stealth? Strangle the people who managed his creative estate?

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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Belial » Tue Jun 17, 2008 2:59 pm UTC

Torvaun wrote:
McCaber wrote:I think I have to mention The Departed here, and probably in the epic movie thread.

Why? It's a good movie, but that's all from good plot and acting, things that they had back in the 50s, probably even more than they do today.


I disagree. Acting has come forward in leaps and bounds since the 50s. It's gotten more subtle, and more....*real* as people adjusted to the medium of film and realized they didn't have to ham things up as much to convey it to the people in the back rows.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Malice » Tue Jun 17, 2008 4:44 pm UTC

Belial wrote:
Torvaun wrote:
McCaber wrote:I think I have to mention The Departed here, and probably in the epic movie thread.

Why? It's a good movie, but that's all from good plot and acting, things that they had back in the 50s, probably even more than they do today.


I disagree. Acting has come forward in leaps and bounds since the 50s. It's gotten more subtle, and more....*real* as people adjusted to the medium of film and realized they didn't have to ham things up as much to convey it to the people in the back rows.


I disagree. The 1950s saw the invention of naturalistic acting (Brando), and there were plenty of subtle performances even before that.
And if you really wanted to show them something new in terms of acting, don't show them The Departed (which is conventional as all hell), show them something like Shortbus (for other reasons, too) or a Nichols film, or Altman--something involving real people, and/or extensive improvisation.

Or something like Adaptation (or, heck, Austin Powers), where the same person plays more than one character simultaneously.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Belial » Tue Jun 17, 2008 4:51 pm UTC

Heh. Shortbus. That would be amusing.
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby The Mighty Thesaurus » Tue Jun 17, 2008 5:32 pm UTC

Malice wrote:Or something like Adaptation (or, heck, Austin Powers), where the same person plays more than one character simultaneously.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0041546/
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dbsmith
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby dbsmith » Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:27 pm UTC

As far as special effects go, I'd have to say Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. That way they could appreciate the special effects in the course of a movie that they'd otherwise enjoy.


.......are you serious???

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Kaiyas
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby Kaiyas » Thu Jun 26, 2008 4:56 am UTC

I coulda sworn I posted earlier...

Saving Private Ryan. D-Day scene was gold.

Bootility

1)The difficulty of kicking a player without bringing up his IP or Server Slot. Typically, Bootility = (Number of standard alphanumerics) + 1.5(Number of keyboard accessible symbols) + 3(ASCII symbols).

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poleboy
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Re: Modern movies to blow 50's directors' minds

Postby poleboy » Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:33 pm UTC

If we're assuming that the directors in question are American or European, I would probably show them Hero.
I don't really know a lot about Chinese cinema from that era, but I'm pretty sure they would not expect China to ever produce something like that. Besides, it contains a lot of the other impressive details people have mentioned such as impressive SFX (the fight in the rain), invisible wires and subtle manipulation of color (the fight where the seasons change).

Bootility (noun): The ability to apply the size or mass of one's booty (posterior) to accomplish tasks in which it is traditionally not involved.
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Comes from a merging of the words "booty" and "utility".


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