Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

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Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby qinwamascot » Sat Oct 11, 2008 3:30 am UTC

This topic is primarily about classical music; If you aren't really interested in it then you should probably post somewhere else.

I've heard a wide variety of classical music composers, pieces, and performers. However, regardless of what I listen to, I always seem to gravitate back to Brahms. His music is just so amazing in that it can evoke emotion while being written based on extremely stringent theory. It's a wonder that anyone could write this well to me, as I know a good deal of theory and have tried to write things. Regardless of what I write, one of three things happens: I lose all emotion, or I abandon theory entirely and get something that sounds bad, or I drift into one of the melodies of someone else without realizing it.

Regardless of what I listen to, romantic music seems to be the closest thing to musical perfection. Impressionism just sounds like noise that happens to be in tune. Classical period stuff is dull and mass-produced. Baroque is nice, but feels empty emotionally. Modern stuff can sometimes evoke emotion, but a lot of the things done in it make me wince.

What do you think about Romantic composers? Who is your favorite composer (Romantic period or otherwise)? What pieces would you recommend from him? I'm interested in broadening my listening, so anything will be appreciated!
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Chai Kovsky » Sat Oct 11, 2008 5:00 am UTC

Mahler. Schubert. Brahms. Bruckner. Schumann. Tchaikovsky. Schnitzel with noodles. These are a few of my favorite things.

I think the third movement of Brahms 3 is the most heartbreakingly beautiful piece of music on Earth.. And if you like that, you'll also like movement 2 of Schumann 4 (surprisingly similar motive).

But the Saint Saens cello concerto #1 is my favorite piece of music. It's absolutely gorgeous. Go listen to it. Now. Do it.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby qinwamascot » Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:41 am UTC

Chai Kovsky wrote:Mahler. Schubert. Brahms. Bruckner. Schumann. Tchaikovsky. Schnitzel with noodles. These are a few of my favorite things.

I think the third movement of Brahms 3 is the most heartbreakingly beautiful piece of music on Earth.. And if you like that, you'll also like movement 2 of Schumann 4 (surprisingly similar motive).

But the Saint Saens cello concerto #1 is my favorite piece of music. It's absolutely gorgeous. Go listen to it. Now. Do it.


Amazing! you picked out my favorite piece ever (Saint-Saens)! I'm learning to play it too. It's brilliant in every way, and even though I don't like most of his later works, this one solidifies him in my top 10 favorite composers.

As for Brahms 3, I really liked it. I haven't heard Schumann 4 because my CD that I ordered was scratched and didn't play it correctly :cry: but I hope to get another copy soon.

I really like most of your composers. Perhaps I should listen to more Bruckner...I only have about 2 pieces by him, and neither is great, so I didn't really get any more. Is there anything you can recommend by him?
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Chai Kovsky » Sat Oct 11, 2008 5:38 pm UTC

qinwamascot wrote:Amazing! you picked out my favorite piece ever (Saint-Saens)! I'm learning to play it too. It's brilliant in every way, and even though I don't like most of his later works, this one solidifies him in my top 10 favorite composers.

As for Brahms 3, I really liked it. I haven't heard Schumann 4 because my CD that I ordered was scratched and didn't play it correctly :cry: but I hope to get another copy soon.

I really like most of your composers. Perhaps I should listen to more Bruckner...I only have about 2 pieces by him, and neither is great, so I didn't really get any more. Is there anything you can recommend by him?

I actually first got into classical music when Fantasia 2000 came out. I loved the flamingo with the yo-yo, so my mom got me a copy of Carnival of the Animals by Saint Saens. I'm about to start listening to his opera Sampson and Delilah, so I'll report on that. As for you learning the Saint Saens concerto, let me know when you've done it so I can marry you.

I'm tempted to recommend Bruckner's Symphony 0 in D Minor, if only because it exists. I also like his symphonies 4 and 7, but personally his motets are my favorite. I've performed a couple and they're really a step above the average choral writing. I typically dislike listening, as opposed to performing, choral music, so it says a lot that I like to listen to Bruckner's works.

Breaking out the old iPod to add to this list. I can't believe I forgot Prokofiev the first time. I particularly like Lt. Kije and his Romeo and Juliet ballet. Liszt and Rachmaninov are my favorite Romantic composers for piano, if only because both of them were utterly insane. I like Rachmaninov's second piano concerto, and Liszt's Réminiscences de Don Juan, which I guess is best enjoyed if you really love the Mozart opera. There's Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique to be totally pedestrian (I love movement 4), but basically any concerto Tchaik ever wrote will ultimately take the cake, with the violin concerto taking the cake, frosting, and the plate it was served on.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Antimatter Spork » Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:02 pm UTC

I generally think of Prokofiev as being more neo-classical than romantic, but whatever.

Brahms wrote the best symphonies of pretty much anyone. The 4th is probably my favorite, but I love them all.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby 0range » Sat Oct 18, 2008 11:10 am UTC

Schumann has so many wonderful little albums. His piano music is usually much more difficult to play than it sounds, though, which is a bummer.

I'm also a big fan of Grieg (check out the Holberg suite if you haven't) Faure, Heller, Alkan, and Mendelsohhn, among others.

I'm going to assume that nobody's mentioned people like Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninoff and late Beethoven (here's an awesome take on Beethoven's Waldstein sonata... really imaginitive.. and.. what a babe!) because it's too obvious, so... couple terribly neglected composer with some real gems are Amy Beach and Clara Schumann.

Also, more impressionistic/modern than Romantic, but worth mention are a few near-unknowns in Victor Carbajo, Henrique Oswald and Carlos Gomes. The former is Argentinian, and the latter two are Brazilian. You can get all of Victor Carbajo's sheet music from his website for free (mp3s too!) at carbajo.net - take a look at his Humana Primavera suite (number 4 is particularly beautiful).

Some things that sound Romantic but are Baroque - Domenico Scarlatti, some Handel suites (check out no.5 'Harmonious Blacksmith' if you haven't)

Rachmaninoff's Variations on Paganini Theme are absolutely gorgeous... it is certainly arguable that no.18 is one of the most poignant pieces ever written.

I'm starting to digress... I will stop now.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby ChocloManx » Sat Oct 18, 2008 10:12 pm UTC

I'm not really into a lot of romanticism, but Grieg, Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky are pretty rad. I don't like Brahms or Strauss. Liszt is okay too. Wagner bores me to death.

I think romanticism in general is too bombastic and pompous. I prefer baroque music (well, actually just Bach and early baroque like Monteverdi), impressionism and dudes like Bartok, Dvorak, Schoenberg and some of the stuff by Messiaen (particulary Oiseaux exotiques), Varese and various other newer composers.

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby une see » Sat Oct 18, 2008 11:46 pm UTC

Chopin, Chopin, always Chopin. I might be biased because I play piano, and Chopin composed almost solely for the piano, but Chopin is absolutely my favorite. Hmm...I love Schumann/Schubert (I can never get those two straight...whatever, I'm pretty sure I like both of them, so it doesn't matter :P), Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, Brahms, Mendelssohn, and...others who I forget right now. Um...I like Liszt sometimes (Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, for example), but some of his stuff is just technicality and no musicality. I much prefer Chopin's pieces. Cause he's the bestest.

Anyways, just cause I feel like it, here's a version of Chopin's Scherzo in B Minor, Op. 20 No. 1, played by my favorite pianist, Sviatoslav Richter. Isn't it exquisite?

And just for kicks, let's throw in Ernest Bloch's Nigun, from the Baal Shem Suite, played by Ivry Gitlis.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Eitel » Sun Oct 19, 2008 6:11 am UTC

I also am in love with Chopin. Playing his Nocturne in C Minor for recital, and being very frustrated at his fourth ballade's coda.

Being a piano player does seem to cause one to favor Chopin though, at any rate, you said you don't like impressionist stuff, and I don't know if you've heard him, but you may like some of Ravel's stuff, such as his Ondine.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby reflectia » Sun Oct 19, 2008 7:56 pm UTC

Chopin, Ravel, Brahms, Grieg, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, Schumann, Mahler, Mendelssohn, and some later Beethoven.

Probably biased, as this is from the pianist's POV. One thing that I do find somewhat annoying about Romantic composers' compositions for piano is their tendency to use increasingly large chords - sounds exquisite, but is hell to play with small hands.

Am currently playing: Liszt's Transcription of Rigoletto (which is absolutely beautiful, but the more I play it, the less the recordings are satisfying), Ravel's Sonatine, Grieg's Piano Concerto in A Major, 1st Mov
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby une see » Sun Oct 19, 2008 9:18 pm UTC

reflectia wrote:Probably biased, as this is from the pianist's POV. One thing that I do find somewhat annoying about Romantic composers' compositions for piano is their tendency to use increasingly large chords - sounds exquisite, but is hell to play with small hands.


Yeah, I've never heard of a pianist who didn't love Chopin. Except Glenn Gould, I guess, but he doesn't count cause he's...Glenn Gould.

And yes! Such large chords! Especially Rachmaninoff, that freak of nature. What was his handspan again? Like 13 keys? Something crazy like that.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby qinwamascot » Sun Oct 19, 2008 10:27 pm UTC

you don't like impressionist stuff


I guess I was a little too harsh. I like some impressionist stuff, but at its worst I can't hear any music in it. So maybe I'm just not listening the right way, but I've tried. A lot of Ravel is interesting to me, although I don't enjoy much of it. I'll look into that piece.

There seem to be a lot of pianists here. Interesting. Yes, Rachmaninov had a 13 key span. I can barely reach 11 on a good day, and I have long fingers. So 13 is god-like. I like piano music, but really prefer orchestral things. Just seem more grandiose, although I'm not saying the piano music is at all bad.

ChocloManx wrote:I'm not really into a lot of romanticism, but Grieg, Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky are pretty rad. I don't like Brahms or Strauss. Liszt is okay too. Wagner bores me to death.

I think romanticism in general is too bombastic and pompous. I prefer baroque music (well, actually just Bach and early baroque like Monteverdi), impressionism and dudes like Bartok, Dvorak, Schoenberg and some of the stuff by Messiaen (particulary Oiseaux exotiques), Varese and various other newer composers.

This post is horribly written.


That pompous and bombastic nature is exactly what I like. Baroque is interesting, but sometimes I just don't feel as much emotion. I've not met many people who actually say they don't like Brahms, you're number 7 I think. I'll agree that Wagner is very boring.

Meteorswarm wrote:Dvorak's stuff is amazing. His first symphony is really enthralling to me. Listen to it!


I like his cello concerto; it's ridiculously over-the-top in terms of emotion and orchestration. Some Dvorak feels a bit too...I don't know...nevermind. But I really like a lot of his stuff.

Just to bring in some new people into the discussion, has anyone heard Rimsky-Korsakov (I'm sure basically everyone has)? He wrote Scheherazade and The Flight of the Bumblebee, among other things. My favorite work of his is his Russian Easter Overture. But some of the other stuff, like the operas, are quite boring IMO.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby reflectia » Sun Oct 19, 2008 11:45 pm UTC

une see wrote:Yeah, I've never heard of a pianist who didn't love Chopin. Except Glenn Gould, I guess, but he doesn't count cause he's...Glenn Gould.

And yes! Such large chords! Especially Rachmaninoff, that freak of nature. What was his handspan again? Like 13 keys? Something crazy like that.


Pfft, Glenn Gould.

Also, what I wouldn't give to be a freak of nature like Rachmaninoff :P Although didn't Schumann injure his hands because he did something to them because he wanted them to have a larger span?

EDIT: Mandatory 60-second Google search reveals the above is probably not true. Oops.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby BobMacDhonnchaidh » Sun Oct 19, 2008 11:59 pm UTC

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Sandry » Tue Oct 21, 2008 12:56 am UTC

qinwamascot wrote:Just to bring in some new people into the discussion, has anyone heard Rimsky-Korsakov (I'm sure basically everyone has)? He wrote Scheherazade and The Flight of the Bumblebee, among other things. My favorite work of his is his Russian Easter Overture. But some of the other stuff, like the operas, are quite boring IMO.

I like Rimsky-Korsakov well enough. Particularly his Tale of the Tsar Sultan, but I do admit to liking both Mussorgsky and Borodin better. Borodin's Polovetsian Dances makes me very happy, and Mussorgsky's opera Boris Godunov is totally spiff.

I do like a bunch of romantic era stuff, but it's not as exciting to me as modern stuff or baroque music (no, I am not just copying ChocloManx, really!) I do, also, absolutely detest Wagner. I don't just find him boring. I find him bloody unbearable after roughly five minutes. I think I've told most folks who've ever listened to me ramble about classical music about my Wagner/cheesecake analogy. Basically, his stuff is so ludicrously heavy that a five minute work of his is like a slice of cheesecake. I'm not a big fan of cheesecake, but this would be tolerable... if Wagner EVER wrong 5 minute pieces. Instead we get the Ring Cycle. Which is like "HERE, have these twenty seven cheesecakes!" And then makes me ill.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Antimatter Spork » Wed Oct 22, 2008 3:09 am UTC

Wagner was an anti-semite and I unashamedly use that as an excuse to avoid having anything to do with his music. (Ok, that's not entirely true. I do like the overtures, though I don't really have the attention span for the operas)

reflectia wrote:Although didn't Schumann injure his hands because he did something to them because he wanted them to have a larger span?
I always thought he injured them trying to work on fourth finger independence.

Rimsky-Korsakov is pretty awesome.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby incompetentia » Wed Oct 22, 2008 8:34 am UTC

As a composer of "new music", I must say I have to disagree with most any blanket modern music statement. Steve Reich != George Rochberg != Pierre Boulez != Alban Berg != Harry Partch. (Anybody not familiar with Partch's music should really think about clicking this link and at least watch the first minute.)

Sticking with romanticism mostly based on the topic. As a biased pianist by upbringing, I must of course cite Chopin, Liszt, and Rachmaninoff. Beethoven's string quartets are quite amazing, I would say. Mendelssohn, Schumann (working through Opus 12 and enjoying it), Brahms (Brahms 1 is one of those that I listen to relatively frequently), Berlioz (sadly I don't know much beyond the obvious Symphonie fantastique), Tchaikovsky, Grieg, and Sibelius.
Schubert is good, but his pieces can very very easily drag on. He has his moments, though, especially with the song cycles.
Dvorak, among others, seems to be a bit over-the-top. (On the other hand, Prokofiev and Schostakovich are similarly over-the-top, but he knows it/he had no other choice.)
Wagner is a resounding meh from me. Generally one to write shorter things, I am not big on operas in general, and on long things, but come on. Seriously. They had two Ring parties at the conservatory I studied at during my undergrad years (Friday night through Saturday morning). I did not attend either.
As a double chemistry major, I give a shoutout to Borodin, the man who brought us aldol condensations and half of Prince Igor. Not a big fan of the music, although he probably wouldn't like mine so much either.
I am generally not an opera fan, but come on. No Verdi, people? :P

And a whole host of other composers I do enjoy a few pieces from:
Lalo's Cello Concerto.
Smetana's Ma vlast. (Hell of string parts in Moldau.)
Saint-Saens.
Mussorgsky. I need to listen to more of his orchestral music.
I played Massenet's Meditation from Thais a few years earlier. Might be something to check out for strings people.
Fauré's songs.
Janacek's Sinfonietta.
Edward MacDowell's piano music.
Vaughan Williams (string music) and Holst (The Planets).
Scriabin and tough piano music.
Schoenberg's tonal period.
The Pines of Rome by Respighi.
Kodaly on occasion.
Walter Piston. (I'm tempted to write Gershwin here, but him and plenty more transitional composers I'm leaving out because they're really not in the late tonal/romantic mindset. Plus, my post would be twice as long as it already is.)
Copland's ballet scores. (Buckaroo Holiday is probably my favorite.)
Alan Hovhaness - another person the Romantic types could really fall in love with. He uses lots of baroque construction (fugue), but he writes with a Romantic language. Nearly a hundred symphonies, many with mountain-influenced titles, among others.
George Rochberg's later work.

I am not a fan of formulaic music in general - dodecaphony, the 18th-century contrapuntal works, that kind of stuff. Classical music I can stomach, but only so much at a time. I will agree that Romanticism is my preference if restricted to pre-1900, although music of the Renaissance is often quite stunning and at times clever. (If I had to rank by era, I'd probably say 20th c. >> romanticism = early Renaissance >> classical > medieval > late Renaissance >> baroque.)
I would be interested to see how those of you who place Romanticism on the pedestal would react to Excursions by Samuel Barber, Passio by Arvo Pärt, or even a Schnittke piece such as the String Trio.

Sorry about long post, you may continue with the discussion now. :oops:

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby miles01110 » Wed Oct 22, 2008 1:44 pm UTC

Am I right if I surmise that when people in this thread say they "like" something they mean that they enjoy how it sounds and nothing further?

If that's the case you should look into some of the history behind the piece and/or the technicalities of why it is (or isn't) part of the standard repertoire. You'll probably find it a lot more interesting.

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby incompetentia » Wed Oct 22, 2008 7:47 pm UTC

I was brought into most music literature from a historical context, although I am guilty of listing several pieces above I know nothing about.

Music history is awesome stuff.

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Antimatter Spork » Wed Oct 22, 2008 8:31 pm UTC

I don't know if I'd really consider impressionists to be part of the Romantic period. Basically, if the composer is active after 1900, I stop considering them romantic by default and try to classify them by how their music actually sounds. If they are clearly in the Romantic tradition, whatever, but I wouldn't consider the impressionists or other more modern styles (neo-classicism, populism, dodecaphony, etc.) to be romantic.

Also, Boulez was an interesting composer who just happened to call anyone who disagreed with him/he didn't like a fascist.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby ChocloManx » Wed Oct 22, 2008 9:19 pm UTC

incompetentia wrote:
I am not a fan of formulaic music in general - dodecaphony, the 18th-century contrapuntal works, that kind of stuff.


What. I'd hardly call Bach's (or Eisler's, or Schoenberg's) contrapuntal works "formulaic". To me they are very emotional works, which happen to use a very complicated technique.

(Also that Harry Pratch video was very cool)
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby incompetentia » Thu Oct 23, 2008 12:42 am UTC

Antimatter Spork wrote:Also, Boulez was an interesting composer who just happened to call anyone who disagreed with him/he didn't like a fascist.

Oh dear. I grew up in Cleveland, so Boulez was either everybody's hero or everybody's worst enemy. To this day I am still not able to extricate my own opinion of the music from the bull that I was fed by every single music teacher I had.

Apologies on the 'formulaic' semantic issue - I was not going for negative connotation, but the fact that there is a controlling technique for local structure as well as the overall structure that is deeper than 'motif 1, motif 2, maybe varied, ooh some other stuff' makes me a bit leery. (I may also be heavily heavily biased against Bach due to having had to play endless preludes and fugues right around the time I entered college...*twitch*)

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby ChocloManx » Thu Oct 23, 2008 2:35 am UTC

incompetentia wrote: (I may also be heavily heavily biased against Bach due to having had to play endless preludes and fugues right around the time I entered college...*twitch*)


I do that for fun :P (well, just preludes and inventions, fugues are too advanced for me)
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby miles01110 » Thu Oct 23, 2008 4:46 pm UTC

incompetentia wrote:Apologies on the 'formulaic' semantic issue - I was not going for negative connotation, but the fact that there is a controlling technique for local structure as well as the overall structure that is deeper than 'motif 1, motif 2, maybe varied, ooh some other stuff' makes me a bit leery.


Beethoven, Brahms, and the rest stick to this as strictly as Bach did. It's just less obvious in the way they develop their motifs. It's really quite amazing when you hear it.

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby qinwamascot » Thu Oct 23, 2008 6:04 pm UTC

I'd say there are very strong conventions in the romantic period, but they're just more complex than the baroque or classical periods. Impressionism was, in my opinion, the first real 'out-of-the-box' thing. The conventions basically disappeared, and whatever the composer liked at then time was what got written. That's not necessarily bad or good.

However, the theory behind the romantic music was always secondary to the effect. Baroque, in my opinion, is reversed from this. Because of this, new conventions developed. If you listen to Brahms, he was extremely conservative in terms of following convention to the letter, yet he still wrote a wide variety. Beethoven and Liszt and Saint-Saens do this a lot less, but what they did started to become convention after they did it.

(I may also be heavily heavily biased against Bach due to having had to play endless preludes and fugues right around the time I entered college...*twitch*)


Bach can at times get dull if you only listen to the same kind of piece. You should try listening to some of his other things. The cello suites are my favorites, partially because I can play them and there's enough variety. But I can see that preludes and fugues all the time would get a bit dull.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Qoppa » Thu Oct 23, 2008 7:27 pm UTC

I'm YAP (Yet Another Pianist), so I'm too likely biased, but whatever. Chopin is a god. I love his preludes and nocturnes most. Especially the slower ones with feeling. Or the faster ones with lots of feeling. I hate music which is just there to show how fast you can play and has little substance. Chopin is awesome because he's really good at not doing this. Even his fast, showy pieces are still able to evoke some kind of emotion.

Other composers worthy of mentioning are Beethoven (mostly for his piano sonatas. All of them. Not just the popular couple), Rachmaninoff, Brahms (one of my all time favourite pieces is his Intermezzo in A Major Op. 118, No. 2), and a bit less known, Scriabin.

I wish I had more time to practice. There are so many pieces that I want to learn but don't have the time to do so.

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby miles01110 » Thu Oct 23, 2008 8:04 pm UTC

qinwamascot wrote:However, the theory behind the romantic music was always secondary to the effect.


I don't think I agree with this as written. Care to elaborate? Even in the "canonical" romantic works the way the composer manipulates theme, motive, and technical details is responsible for what you call "the effect"

If you listen to Brahms, he was extremely conservative in terms of following convention to the letter, yet he still wrote a wide variety. Beethoven and Liszt and Saint-Saens do this a lot less, but what they did started to become convention after they did it.


Beethoven stuck to "convention" more than any of the composers you mentioned above. Even in "Eroica" and the 9th.

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Antimatter Spork » Thu Oct 23, 2008 8:23 pm UTC

You guys seem to be under the impression that works of genuine emotion cannot also be constructed with a subtle beauty of form that contains symmetries on multiple levels or contrapuntal/imitative complexity.

You're wrong.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby reflectia » Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:18 pm UTC

Antimatter Spork wrote:You guys seem to be under the impression that works of genuine emotion cannot also be constructed with a subtle beauty of form that contains symmetries on multiple levels or contrapuntal/imitative complexity.

You're wrong.

Word. Off-topic from Romantic music, but I used to dislike Bach's Inventions/Sinfonias/Fugues/Suites, etc., but recently I've found his music to be increasingly beautiful. I think that when well-constructed (as is with Bach), a piece's complex form only contributes to the emotion. I think that it's too narrow to think of form and emotion as two completely separate properties.
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby incompetentia » Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:42 am UTC

Antimatter Spork wrote:You guys seem to be under the impression that works of genuine emotion cannot also be constructed with a subtle beauty of form that contains symmetries on multiple levels or contrapuntal/imitative complexity.

You're wrong.

I seem to have set off a firestorm of comments with a simple misstatement of what I wanted to say, so I'll try to clarify again:

The master's touch of form is not something that comes around very often, and obviously I can appreciate such things (as in itself it is probably my greatest deficiency in my music). It is just not something I would listen to altogether too often for myself. I would not be saying that I don't appreciate such forms because I was overexposed to such stuff in junior high.
I never said it wasn't good music, or that it was emotionless. You have license to slap me several times next time I do.

So...how bout dem rachmaninofs guyz

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby miles01110 » Fri Oct 24, 2008 12:02 pm UTC

incompetentia wrote:The master's touch of form is not something that comes around very often, and obviously I can appreciate such things (as in itself it is probably my greatest deficiency in my music). It is just not something I would listen to altogether too often for myself. I would not be saying that I don't appreciate such forms because I was overexposed to such stuff in junior high.
I never said it wasn't good music, or that it was emotionless. You have license to slap me several times next time I do.


But what I am saying is that in many cases you actually are listening to composers that master form first, "emotion" second, and that the "emotion" in the piece is shown through the form (not the other way around).

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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby sparks » Fri Oct 24, 2008 1:08 pm UTC

Romanticism basically wins in every field, be it Music, Literature, Visual Arts. There, I've said it.

That said, I am Liszt fan girl, as well as Tchaikovsky. Chopin is also basically brilliant. I can't actually choose just one; I'm a sucker for them all. You name them. 8)
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Re: Romantic Composers (and others to a lesser extent)

Postby Eitel » Tue Oct 28, 2008 2:48 pm UTC

On another note, Shostakovich's symphonies and string quartets are brilliant. Not so much a fan of his piano works, although his Prelude and Fugue no. 15 is fun to play if nothing else.
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