World music and Jason Mraz.

It's only cool if no one's heard of it.

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

SpiritOfRock
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2008 4:58 pm UTC

World music and Jason Mraz.

Postby SpiritOfRock » Wed May 18, 2011 6:57 am UTC

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZi3gJSWd4Y
Start watching at 1:25, just for a few dozen seconds.

Jason Mraz, who you've probably heard about through his international hit "I'm Yours" from a few years ago, has a pretty diverse style that's influenced by music from all over the world. He mentions in the interview that his main influence is world music, that he likes music from different cultures and different styles, and honestly, I agree with him. I've got my sizable collection of Rock music, a little bit of Pop, a little bit of Folk, but the music that really always strikes me as interesting is the stuff with such a foreign taste and style that it sounds like it's from a different realm from everything we hear on our radios and youtube stations. Granted, a few Western bands have been capable of this in my opinion, for example Tool, The Tea Party, and of course Mraz. What I'm interested is where you go to get your hands on that kind of extremely diverse, exotic world music.

I took a music appreciation class in High School and one of the main things we learned about was Traditional, or Folk music (according to the book, all music could be classified as traditional, classical, and popular, with popular being just about everything we listen to now), and the first recording we listened to was this all-percussion song from some country just north of Australia who's name I can't remember for the life of me. Apparently the entire song takes several hundred musicians to record and is a nationwide cultural tradition over there. The other members of my class thought it was kind of a bore, but I asked my teacher after the class where I could find an MP3 of that track and where I could find other tracks like it, and he told me he honestly didn't have a clue. It's like there isn't even a market for that kind of exotic music anymore.

Another example is a few months ago when I went to the Renaissance Festival. Being a musician, the first thing I did was go check out the bands on the stages there and try to keep an open mind, and when I sat down and listened, I was absolutely enthralled by the kind of music they were playing. It was mostly Celtic Folk from around the Renaissance (or at least early enough before our time to pass off as Renaissance), with a few Spanish and English folk songs, some of which were as early as the 13th and 14th centuries. I approached the guitarist after the show and asked about where I could get my hands on that kind of music, and he told me that I could buy his album. The thing about his album was that it was mostly original material of his band's, with only a few actual traditional covers. I asked him where he learned about those folk songs he played, and he said that they were passed down to him.

I feel at this point like there is an exotic array of beautiful, unique music out there in the world and that it's borderline impossible to actually go out and find it and listen to it yourself. I guess what I'm trying to say here is, I can't seem to do it; does anyone here know how Jason Mraz does it?
Last edited by SpiritOfRock on Wed May 18, 2011 7:35 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

Dirk
Posts: 55
Joined: Sat May 01, 2010 10:53 pm UTC

Re: World music and Jason Mraz.

Postby Dirk » Wed May 18, 2011 7:25 am UTC

To be honest, Jason Mraz doesn't do this.

He might say he does, but I think otherwise. I enjoy listening to Mraz, it brightens my day and is thus on my mp3-player for quite a while :)
I also enjoy listening to music that takes stuff from non-western influences, you could say I like to listen to different styles.
And in my opinion Mraz does not do this, and if he does, maybe a little.... Some of the rhythms are African. But we've been using African since early jazz.

That said, if you really want to find traditional music, it's matter of the right search words on the internet and perhaps traveling to locations where it is played.

It also depends on the type, it's pretty hard to find traditional Mongolian music. But traditional music from India is not that hard to find (In the right mood, I enjoy some Indian quarter tones very much so), any good music store will have some.

A band that in cooperates different styles very well is Avishai Cohen I think. They take western/modern western harmonies, Jewish singing, eastern European rhythms and sometimes a weird solo by a Indian guitar or flute mixed in it.
Have a listen to their latest album Seven Seas. This one I like in particular: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgMgYsmuwpI

Noiseman433
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2011 1:16 am UTC

Re: World music and Jason Mraz.

Postby Noiseman433 » Sun Jul 03, 2011 1:31 am UTC

SpiritOfRock wrote:
I took a music appreciation class in High School and one of the main things we learned about was Traditional, or Folk music (according to the book, all music could be classified as traditional, classical, and popular, with popular being just about everything we listen to now), and the first recording we listened to was this all-percussion song from some country just north of Australia who's name I can't remember for the life of me. Apparently the entire song takes several hundred musicians to record and is a nationwide cultural tradition over there. The other members of my class thought it was kind of a bore, but I asked my teacher after the class where I could find an MP3 of that track and where I could find other tracks like it, and he told me he honestly didn't have a clue. It's like there isn't even a market for that kind of exotic music anymore.


Sound vaguely like Gamelan, the national music of Indonesia. Practically every village has a Gamelan ensemble and some of the larger villages can have quite a huge group.

As for finding world music--it really depends on what you'd like to find and from what country or region.


Return to “Music”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests