Recommend a book

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mrcheesypants
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mrcheesypants » Fri Sep 05, 2008 12:33 am UTC

Ok for those of you who have not read Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson and are looking for some light reading, please go to your nearest bookstore now. It's a book filled with smartasses, hackers with katanas, and a badass who carries a nuclear bomb with him and slices people with a piece of glass. FUCK YEAH!
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Webzter » Fri Sep 05, 2008 12:38 am UTC

mrcheesypants wrote:Ok for those of you who have not read Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson and are looking for some light reading, please go to your nearest bookstore now. It's a book filled with smartasses, hackers with katanas, and a badass who carries a nuclear bomb with him and slices people with a piece of glass. FUCK YEAH!


Also, while not light (in the length department), Cryptonomicon

I'm surprised this audience hasn't posted this one yet: Gödel, Escher and Bach by Douglas Hofstadter

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gödel,_Escher,_Bach

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby darwinwins » Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:12 pm UTC

world war z.

fantastic read. witty and vivid. zombies.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Ptolom » Sat Sep 06, 2008 3:44 pm UTC

anything by P.G. Wodehouse. If you're feeling down it's impossible not to feel better when you read his books

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby IronyandParadox » Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:05 pm UTC

Shadow of the Wind--Carlos Ruiz Zafon
It's like a mystery-ish-love story-quest-ish-thing. It's bookish and thought provoking. And I think I love it with my whole heart and soul.
Other than that, I'm not going to try to describe it.

Oh, wait. It was originally written in spanish, but the english translation is wonderful. (Not that I know spanish--I just know that it doesn't make you think, "Well...this might have been a good book. If it had a decent translator.")
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Jorpho » Thu Sep 11, 2008 8:22 pm UTC

Have I recommended David Brin's Kiln People yet? Not only is it a rousing adventure, but it has some pretty heady science fiction concepts as well.

The concept: pretty much everyone in the world owns a device which allows them to create clay-based clones of themselves which last about 24 hours, and whose memories can be downloaded back into the mind of their creator. Brin takes this idea to all kinds of interesting places.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby LittleKey » Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:03 am UTC

The House of the Scorpion. Or something to that effect. Numerous award winner, including Newberry; brilliant book.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby darwinwins » Sat Sep 13, 2008 3:22 am UTC

for anyone thinking about living abroad for a year and working: a year in the merde.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby DaPhinoXX » Sat Sep 13, 2008 1:41 pm UTC

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby DarkKnightJared » Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:12 pm UTC

NuclearWinter wrote:The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein

Awesome book about anarchy, rebellion and humanity


Seconded. 8)

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby psyck0 » Fri Sep 19, 2008 12:01 am UTC

Anything by A.J. Cronin. A classical writer who does NOT get enough love these days, although he was fairly popular in his time. My favourite author. If I had to recommend one single book of his, it would be The Citadel. He reminds me a bit of the Russian classics, as in he writes about people and life, not about a story. It's beautiful.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Mercurius » Sat Sep 20, 2008 4:00 pm UTC

A long list of books I have read and recommend is below. Some people may have mentioned some of them, but I included them anyway.

Spoiler:
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
The Rebel, Albert Camus
The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi.
Revelation X - The Subgenius Foundation
The Will to Power by Nietzsche
Candide, by Voltaire
The Iliad by Homer (and supporting artists)
The History of the Peloponnesian War by Thucydides
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli
Discourses on Livy by Niccolo Machiavelli
Godel, Escher, Bach by Douglas R. Hofstadter
Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond
Tao te Ching by Lao Tzu
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson
Transmetropolitan by Warren Ellis
The Invisibles by Grant Morrison
The Filth by Grant Morrison
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Brought to Light by Alan Moore
Chaos: Making a New Science by James Gleick
A Perfect Spy by John le Carre
The Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Society and the Spectacle by Guy Debord
The Temporary Autononmous Zone/Broadsheets on Ontological Chaos by Hakim Bey
FM3-24 Counterinsurgency Manual by General Petraeus and General Amos
FM-31-20-3 Foreign Internal Defence Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Special Forces Field Manual, by US Army
Pure Effect by Derren Brown
The Mind's I by Douglas Hofstadter and Daniel Dennett
The Red Queen: Sex & The Evolution of Human Nature by Matt Ridley
The Authoritarians by Bob Altermeyer
Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig
The Pirate's Dilemma by Matt Mason
The Thirty-Six Strategems by T'ai Kung
Confessions of an Economic Hitman by John Perkins
Imperial Hubris by Michael Scheuer
Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes
The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas Kuhn
The Assassins of Alamut by Anthony Campbell
Hagakure by Yamamoto Tsunetomo
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Being and Nothingness by Jean-Paul Satre
The City by Leo Strauss
Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle
On Liberty by John Stuart Mill
From Dawn to Decadence: 500 years of Western Cultural Life by Jacques Barzun
Trickster Makes This World by Lewis Hyde
Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
The Rise and Fall of the State by Martin van Creveld
The Concept of the Political by Carl Schmitt
The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein
No Logo by Naomi Klein
Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco
Illicit: How smugglers, traffickers and copycats are hijacking the global economy, by Moses Naim
Networks, Terrorism and Global Insurgency, edited by Robert J Bunker
Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq's Green Zone by Rajiv Chandrasekaran
Why the Allies Won by Richard Overy
NATO's Secret Armies: Operation Gladio & Terrorism in Western Europe by Daniele Gasner
God's War: A New History of the Crusades by Christopher Tyerman
Empire by Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt
Fear and Loathing On the Campaign Trail 1972 by Hunter S Thompson
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby nevskey1 » Sun Sep 21, 2008 4:43 pm UTC

Ooh, big time shout out to The Assassins by Joyce Carol Oates. Last I saw, it was out of print so I had to get it used off Amazon, but I've since seen several libraries carry it. Basically, a WASP politician is killed, and approximately the same time period after his death is seen through three different perspectives: his wife and two brothers. They are all totally nuts, but they are like a petri dish of America under a microscope. It's like three complementary novels in one. (Think Alexandria Quartet.) I got the book because I was into the whole paranoia aspect of Gravity's Rainbow, Illuminatus!, PKD, etc. This book fits right in. It basically depicts from the inside (stream of consciousness) all the gory details of three different psychotic breakdowns, filled with paranoia and conspiracy theories to boot. (Oddly, it came out the same year as GR (1974) -- also the same year PKD had his breakdown and published Flow My Tears -- and a year before Illuminatus! (1975). Go figure. Something must have been in the water.)

Anyway, great book. All the typical JCO style stuff (very detailed descriptions, long sentences, stream of consc., etc.), but a supremely interesting page-turner. Highly recommended. JCO is a master stylist.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby GCM » Thu Sep 25, 2008 3:00 pm UTC

Oh yeah, has anyone had a chance to read Brisingr yet? I enjoyed Eragon. Eldest was good too, even though it was really draggy, like Paolini was channeling Hideo Kojima or something.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby crucialityfactor » Thu Sep 25, 2008 9:59 pm UTC

Forgive me if I've repeated any, I just got really excited about halfway through page 2 with all the books I was thinking of recommending.

Whomever said Jose Saramago before was dead-on. I'm reading Blindness right now (started it before I realized that it was becoming a movie, but still good timing) and it's amazing. You can't go wrong with anything written by him.

The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin was another book that I just finished. I'm sure a great deal of you have read the Earthsea trilogy by her, but this book was amazing. It's a pretty quick read too. The Dispossessed is another book to check out by her, but rather long, but completely awesome. I've read it three times already.

I've been on a bit of a George Saunders kick as of late. The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil is a great little book. Very short, very absurd, very true. The social commentary smacks you in the face with every turn of the page.


That's all for now. I look forward to checking out some of your recommendations. I've got about 6 or 7 books that I'm currently reading in one sense or another (or about to begin reading) but there's always room for a few more.

*Edit:

Silly me. I loveHunter S. Thompson. I strongly recommend both The Rum Diary (being made into a movie right now, also his first novel) and Screwjack (a collection of 3 short stories, all awesome).

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby opzori » Wed Oct 01, 2008 4:40 am UTC

I've been lurking around the fora for awhile now, but I just registered because I have to say that after reading all the recommendations for "House of Leaves" I feel compelled to read it and see what all the talk is about. I ordered it online about a week ago and it came in today! I'm so excited! I love recommendations from "book people".

I guess I should throw some out too. Read it a few years back, but I really enjoyed "The Professor and the Madman" by Simon Winchester. It's about the making of the OED. I just started reading "The Map That Changed the World" by Winchester, and it seems pretty promising.

If you're into this sort of thing, I'd say Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" was interesting to read, although I found it hard to get into the story at first. Actually, I'd recommend most of Faulkner's novels (if you can get through the bizarre stream of consciousness stuff, etc.). I love how he created Yoknapatawpha County to set the stories in and involved the characters in more than one novel.

I would also recommend the Dark Tower series by Stephen King (although I've seen in some threads that there are mixed feelings about the series). I had some complaints (the ending irritated me among a few other things), but the story was pretty innovative IMO and pulled me in.

I now have a long list of things I want to read thanks to this thread! :D

EDIT: and by "get through" the stream of consciousness stuff I mean enjoy it :)

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dbsmith
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby dbsmith » Wed Oct 01, 2008 11:10 pm UTC

Joe Abercrombie's The Blade Itself series. Dark gritty fantasy with believable multi-faceted characters and unpredictable plot turns.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby slamadoca » Fri Oct 03, 2008 12:19 pm UTC

Ok, so it's been mentioned once before, but not much was said, so Ill give it another go-round. If you read any sort of serious fantasy, and you haven't yet read The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss, you should probably go pull your head out of whatever it is you're re-reading in the fantasy genre (unless its Brisngr, havent gotten to that one yet) and find this book!!

Seriously, do it. Find it, read it, tremble in awe.

Its a great story, basically a first-person account of what actually happened in the life of a hero. Rothfuss breaks stereotypes, creates a believable world, and has kick-ass awesome characters that are so real, I felt like I could walk down the street and meet them some day. (some day in an alternative fantasy world, I admit, but still, it could happen, right?)

Ok, I'm going to end this before it gets any more strung out with obsessive compliments.*


*author of this post was in no way paid to say anything*

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby JayDee » Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:16 am UTC

crucialityfactor wrote:The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. LeGuin was another book that I just finished. I'm sure a great deal of you have read the Earthsea trilogy by her, but this book was amazing. It's a pretty quick read too. The Dispossessed is another book to check out by her, but rather long, but completely awesome. I've read it three times already.

I really enjoyed both of those, surprisingly, as well as Left hand of Darkness. I say surprisingly, because they tend towards being all about stuff I'd hate to read (and probably disagree with) if I read it as non-fiction.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Jedifreak » Sat Oct 18, 2008 2:19 am UTC

I'd recommend Ender's Game, if you haven't read it already.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby nevskey1 » Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:53 pm UTC

Richard Yates.

I know, he's not a book, he's an author. But he's a great author who is sadly underappreciated. I've read his book The Easter Parade, and recommend it. But his masterpiece is Revolutionary Road, which my library doesn't even have, so I can't read it yet.

He writes in this relentless, merciless realism that captures all the nuances of our lives in such a way that it can make you shocked that someone can see through all of our phony bullshit and self-deception so easily. He can go to some very uncomfortable places with the simplest, most bare-bones prose. Check it out if you get the chance. Easter Parade was great, his short stories are great (Eleven Kinds of Loneliness), and Revolutionary Road is a classic, but I haven't read it yet.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Malice » Mon Nov 03, 2008 10:47 am UTC

nevskey1 wrote:Easter Parade was great, his short stories are great (Eleven Kinds of Loneliness), and Revolutionary Road is a classic, but I haven't read it yet.


Revolutionary Road is one of the best-written novels I've ever read in my life. It takes a completely boring, cliche story (suburban family is, surprise surprise, not normal and not happy), and turns it into one of the most powerful, engrossing, and deep books around. Like the very best art, it strikes chords in the soul.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Chfan » Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:21 pm UTC

An excellent book I'm still reading is A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bil Bryson. It's basically a dumbed-down history and summary of the sciences.
Just FYI, the guy isn't avatar isn't me. But he seems pretty cool.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby LDJosh » Tue Nov 11, 2008 6:15 pm UTC

just finished first book of Song of Ice & Fire.
it is indeed a good book/series. I'm in the second book and i look forward to my nightly book-reading-time.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Lawrensaurus » Sun Nov 16, 2008 9:54 pm UTC

Rant: An Oral Biography of Buster Casey. It's got some pretty messed up stuff in it, but if you've ever read Palahniuk, it's to be expected. It's my second favorite of his (just a sliver behind Fight Club). Most of his other books seem to have too predictable a twist, but Rant's ending came out of nowhere for me, and I loved it.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Absolute » Sun Nov 16, 2008 11:47 pm UTC

Julian and Creation by Gore Vidal are both excellent, epic yet easy to read, completely out-of-character for Mr. Vidal. These are also historical novels with an amazing degree of accuracy and detail, which is a real plus to me. I'm looking for something like this at the moment, light enough to read after a long day, yet not so light that I lose interest. I'm leaning toward finding some other Herman Hesse stories, I guess. Anyway, if you're a history buff in need of some medium-weight fiction, these are both excellent.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Fledermen64 » Wed Nov 19, 2008 3:07 am UTC

World War Z
Stranger In a Strange Land
Starship Troopers
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Sandry » Wed Nov 19, 2008 5:30 am UTC

So it was said before, but with no actual information, so I'll say it again: Cory Doctorow - Little Brother. I just picked this up yesterday. It took a little while to hook me because it seemed a little bit trying too hard, at first, but once you get into the thick of things, it's a totally enjoyable and slightly painful experience. It's a quick read, but puts freedom, technology and politics in a different perspective, or at least makes you think about them for a moment.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby moui » Wed Nov 19, 2008 10:42 pm UTC

Jonathan Lethem's Motherless Brooklyn.

A noiresque private eye with Tourette's Syndrome, the lovable hero bumbles and tics his way through a mystery of White Castle proportions. You gain insight into his unique life struggle, and get quite a few laughs out of it as well.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Azure_Twilight » Sat Nov 22, 2008 2:06 am UTC

I'm not good at describing stories or books properly so I'll just list a few I'd recomend: The Foundation Series By Isaac Asmiov, The Blue Sword by McKinley, The Book Thief, and if you can find it Fantasy and Science FIction, Issue: July 1974 has some of my favorite stories.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby greycloud » Sun Nov 23, 2008 7:37 pm UTC

Not sure if anyone's recommended this so far, but I doubt it:

If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things by Jon McGregor

Absolutely... amazing. We had to read the first chapter in A-level, and that chapter alone made me go and buy the book. It's possibly one of the strangest books I've ever read. The whole book's storyline only spans about their equivilant to half a day, because it describes everyones actions in imense detail, paying attention to all of the smallest things that happen so you really get a insight of to what everyone in the whole street is like.

As I said: Amazing.

I garentee the first chapter alone will have you captured.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby evren » Mon Nov 24, 2008 5:53 am UTC

Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day.

His writing has a dreamlike, blurry sort of quality. It pushes the inherent bleakness of the stories to the edge of your mind while you read, making the books almost surprising when everything comes together. Expect to think about the books for a long time after you finish them. Never Let Me Go is a particular favorite of mine, even though I always feel like I've been hit by a bus after reading it.

In another area entirely: Diana Wynne Jones' Howl's Moving Castle, Castle in the Air, and House of Many Ways. A lot of fun to read, and very original for what's considered children's fantasy.

And finally, The White Tiger, by Aravind Adiga. Sharp, irreverent, and hilarious. Very educational on a few different levels.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby DoesntAlwaysGetIt » Fri Nov 28, 2008 10:39 pm UTC

I LOVE BOOKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!.....heheheheh sorry

Um I have a few idk if anyone has heard of some of them

Harry Potter Series
Twilight Saga (even guys can like this one)
Song of the Sparrow
The Prydain Chronicles
The Bible
The Third Witch
The Raging Quiet
Blood and Chocolate
Any Amelia At-Water Rhodes book
The Hobbit
A Walk to Remember
Sword of Darkness
The Thief Lord
Bella at Midnight
Princess: A True Life Story of Life Behind the Veil
Queen's Own Fool
Girl In a Cage
Mary Bloody Mary
Sold
Fairest
Ella Enchanted
The Seer and the Sword
The Princess and the Goblin
The Chronicles of Narnia
The Spiderwick Chronicles
Trickster's Choice
Winter of Fire
Howl's Moving Castle
James Bowie: A man and his knife
Girl With The Pearl Earring
Yah i read a lot i have a longer list too. sorry i know its a long list ^_^

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Kaiyas » Sun Nov 30, 2008 2:48 am UTC

Uh, I looked through the thread and I didn't see Dan Brown in here. I like how he introduces minor elements in the beginning that factor into the end result. Only thing I dislike is his little disclaimer he loves to tack on to his book and how there are factual errors nonetheless.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby SecondTalon » Sun Nov 30, 2008 6:28 am UTC

Kaiyas wrote:Uh, I looked through the thread and I didn't see Dan Brown in here.
There's a reason for that.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby AtlasDrugged » Sun Nov 30, 2008 1:50 pm UTC

Admittedly the Da Vinci Code was a load of trash, but I actually found Digital Fortress quite good.

Am currently reading 'God Created The Integers' by Stephen Hawking - bloody fantastic. Would definitely recommend.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Torvaun » Sun Nov 30, 2008 7:43 pm UTC

AtlasDrugged wrote:Admittedly the Da Vinci Code was a load of trash, but I actually found Digital Fortress quite good.
There is so much wrong with Digital Fortress that I could write a longer book just pointing out everything he screwed up.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby AtlasDrugged » Sun Nov 30, 2008 9:16 pm UTC

Better as a work of fiction - The Da VInci Code was bad because there were frequent 5-page discussions ending in apparent 'revelation's' like 'OH SNAP! A Da Vinci painting proves that Jesus was screwing a random woman!'. Both novels take *ahem* 'liberties with the truth' but at least Digital Fortress doesn't sound like it was created by the postmodernism generator.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby greycloud » Mon Dec 01, 2008 4:39 pm UTC

AtlasDrugged wrote:Admittedly the Da Vinci Code was a load of trash, but I actually found Digital Fortress quite good.

Am currently reading 'God Created The Integers' by Stephen Hawking - bloody fantastic. Would definitely recommend.


I've got 'God Created the Interegers'.. I told myself to read it before I started university... that was 2 months ago lol

I quite like the Da Vinci Code, and I like Angels and Demons too, if you ignore the major lack of scienctific realism in that one. I just liked the strange facts which he gave throughout the story, not so much the story itself, which is why the film was terrible.

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Re: Recommend a book

Postby TheCitadel » Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:27 pm UTC

One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Garcia Marquez. Probably the best book I've ever read, even if it's not my favourite. Oh, and I read A Tale of Two Cities some months ago, and thought it was pretty good, especially the way Dickens writes. The plot gets more complicated as you go on reading and it keeps you interested the whole time. I find that Dickens' stories are quite similar, at least Bleak House has the same structure, but it's worthwhile. If you don't like the story in itself you'll get to appreciate the style in which it is written anyway.
Fight apathy, or don't.


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