Books you like that no one else has heard of

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Gadren
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Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Gadren » Sun Jul 27, 2008 7:56 pm UTC

I don't think there's another thread on this topic, but if there is, I'm sorry. :?

Anyway, what books are there that you've enjoyed, but no one even knows exist? One that jumps out for me isn't actually a book, but an ebook novella. In the computer strategy game Outpost 2: Divided Destiny, every mission in the campaign starts off with a chapter in this novella by J. Steven York. The game itself was pretty fun but somewhat lackluster (especially in the combat that just seemed tacked on), but even today I reread the story. It's a fun sci-fi story, and I particularly enjoyed it because, when I first played the game around the age of 7 or 8, it was my first real introduction to written sci-fi.

You can read the novella online if you're interested.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Zapheod » Mon Aug 18, 2008 7:27 pm UTC

Moon Palace by Paul Auster. I picked it up in Germany many years ago and it has been one of my favorite books ever since. I have since read everything written by Paul Auster and this is still his best work. I would classify it as contemporary sur-realism. A great read for anyone(also pick up Timbuktu. Sad but well written)

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:16 pm UTC

Betsy~Tacy by Maud Hart Lovelace. I consider this series to be perfect for little girls, but they're really not well known. The series is basically a creative autobiography of the author, telling about her life growing up at the turn of the century. Some of the details are changed around, but it's like Laura Ingalls Wilder if she had been born 20 years later.
The first book is about the characters at age 5- it's about 80 pages long, has lots of pictures, and is quite fanciful. The next book takes place at 7, and is about 110 pages. Then 10, at 150 pages, 12, at 210 pages, then all her years of high school at roughly 250-300 pages, then a trip through Europe right before WWI and her first two years of marriage, both over 300 pages. They're just the perfect size for the children's age to read on their own. I can't wait to buy the first book for my niece. They're also sweet, charming books, historically interesting, and full of good lessons without being preachy.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Insanetwist » Wed Aug 20, 2008 1:41 am UTC

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke is one of the most fantastic books I have ever had the pleasure to read. Ms. Clarke spent 10 years writing this novel, and it showed. It tells the story of the revival of magic in England, after a period of roughly 300 years when little or no magic was performed. The two people in the title are Gilbert Norrell, the "Greatest Magician of the Age" who is working hard on two things: to restore magic's respected place in England, and to erase all memory of the mysterious 12th century magician the Raven King, the founder of English magical tradition, wherever he can, and vilifying his name where he can't. Jonathan Strange, his student, and then rival, is known as the second greatest magician of the age, but he looks at magic in an entirely different light. This book takes place over an 11 year period from 1806 to 1817, covering such dramatic periods as the Napoleonic Wars.

Now, I must warn you, the first hundred pages or so are...dull. This is true, and I am sorry. But if you can get past that, you won't be able to turn the pages fast enough. This portion of the book is best described in the review from the Washington Post "Many books are to be read, some are to be studied, and a few are meant to be lived in for weeks. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is of the last kind." It is excellent once you can get past the slightly boring opening part. Well, in truth, the first chapter or two is very interesting and entertaining. After that, however, it gets sort of boring, establishing how Mr. Norrell got established in London, got his political contacts, etc., etc. After that, it will become one of the greatest books you have ever read. For those Neil Gaiman fans I know are out there, he recommended it wholeheartedly, calling it "Unquestionably the finest English novel of the fantastic written in the last seventy years."

Well, there you have it. To those of you who do not decide to read this book, that is your decision, and perfectly ok, although I am disappointed. To those who read it, I can only hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

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Melannen
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Melannen » Wed Aug 20, 2008 5:11 pm UTC

Foundling fox. Its an adorable story about a young mother fox who finds an orphaned kit (baby fox) and adopts him as her own. Its one of those stories that teaches kids about families.. its incredibly sweet. and I highly recommend it to kids.

Living with a Lama. Its about a siamese cat living in the time where siamese cats sold for $2000+ each. Fifi is her name and she was abused by her previous owner, but finds sanctuary in living with a Lama (the person-type Lama, not the animal lol). Its told from the cat's perepective, and you really feel for her as she goes through life from kitten-hood to being an old granny cat. She has litters of kittens for her cruel mistress, most of which are sold and taken away before they're even old enough. She loses litters of kittens because of poor-treatment, and eventually goes blind, and is locked away in a storage shed. The Lama's assistant finds Fifi, thus saving her. The story goes on to tell about her many adventures while living with the Lama and eventually ends when she "cant think about what to write anymore". She doesnt write the story, the Lama does, but its all from Fifi's perspective. A beautiful story, and being the book-worm that I am, never heard of it until my partner's mother told me about it, and lent me her copy.

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Narsil
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Narsil » Thu Aug 21, 2008 1:32 am UTC

Insanetwist wrote:Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

Stop right there. There is no one. No. One. That should not have heard of this book. This book is a marvel, a work of art, and if there is any flaw at all with it, it's that it's too short. (the book is about 1,000 pages long)

Sadly, so much of my stuff is pretty well known among bibliophiles. How about Cosmopolis, by Don DeLillo. It's about Eric Packer, a man who lives in excess, and his trip downtown in a stretch limo on the day of his downfall. It's a harrowing look at a future that's moving exponentially faster until everything is obsolete the moment it's conceived.
Spoiler:
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Kendra
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Kendra » Thu Aug 21, 2008 3:28 am UTC

Narsil wrote:
Insanetwist wrote:Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

Stop right there. There is no one. No. One. That should not have heard of this book. This book is a marvel, a work of art, and if there is any flaw at all with it, it's that it's too short. (the book is about 1,000 pages long).


Agreed. It did have a slow beginning, but everything in that portion was necessary to the rest of the story. It was amazing. I think I sat there for two days straight reading it almost non-stop.

Insanetwist wrote:For those Neil Gaiman fans I know are out there, he recommended it wholeheartedly, calling it "Unquestionably the finest English novel of the fantastic written in the last seventy years."


On a related note, in The Ladies of Grace Adieu, Clarke borrowed Wall from Gaiman for one of the stories.

But I digress.



Killing Yourself to Live by Chuck Klosterman. Non-fiction. Well, mostly non-fiction. The first page of the book says, "This is a story about love, death, driving, narcissism, America, the ill-advised glamorization of recreational drug use, not having sex, eating breadsticks at Olive Garden, talking to strangers, feeling nostalgic for the extremely recent past, movies you've never seen, KISS, Radiohead, Rod Stewart, and--to a lesser extent--prehistoric elephants of the Midwestern Plains. If these are not things that interest you, do not read this book." I don't think I could explain it better.

A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore (or pretty much anything else he's written). A Dirty Job is about Charlie, who becomes a "death merchant" shortly after his wife's death, and all his adventures from that point onward. Death merchants collect "soul vessels" (which are what they sound like--objects that hold a person's soul) shortly before or after the person's death, and then sell them in their shops (antiques dealers, record stores, etc). Very funny. Also very sad and philosophical in parts.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Amoeba » Thu Aug 21, 2008 10:13 pm UTC

You Don't Know Me by David Klass. A wonderful story of domestic violence (that bit's not so wonderful) and growing up that stays lucid and doesn't try too hard to be weighty. It's not aimed at adults, but manages not to be patronising about growing up, which is a relief. I love the little fantasy worlds he builds to escape his reality, and the whole book's just marvellous. I should really reread it.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby SlesterPanechy » Thu Aug 21, 2008 10:24 pm UTC

Poetic Off Licence by Hovis Presley (real name Richard McFarlane). The book is a short anthology of his poems. They are some of the most poignant and clever poems I have ever read and his wit is razor sharp. If the imagery doesnt get you then the puns most certainly will. Look on youtube for some of his live recitals.

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Amberfire
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Amberfire » Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:59 am UTC

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell.... I'm guilty. I haven't finished it yet. I pick it up, read it incessantly for a few days, wait a few months, then read it like an insane person again. Unfortunately, I get really caught up with other books, especially library books which have due dates (I own my own copy of Jonathan Strange), so I kinda forget/shove the book to the side.

But I third? fourth? its awesomeness. It's amazing. I love it. I need to freakin' finish it.

Melusine by Sarah Monette... why has no one heard of it until I force them to read it?! I love the series Melusine starts, called the Doctrine of Labyrinths. It's one of the most original and interesting books I've ever had the fortune to read. Melusine is written in first person by two men who may have more in common than they think: a cynical cat-burglar named Mildmay the Fox, who is talented at telling stories (and since Monette is very, very good at what she does, Mildmay is very, very good at what he does), and a wizard named Felix who hides his misery and bleak past behind an arrogant facade. The story is unpredictable, not at all 'epic,' rather dark, and endlessly fascinating. One of the most amazing things is the way Mildmay and Felix both have their own, consistent, different voices that reveal their personality and background about as much as their actions do, in a way that can still be defined as 'showing' and not 'telling.' The following books are called The Virtu and The Mirador.

Also, I think Melusine is being sold by Chapters/Coles in hardcover for about $4.99, so if you live in Canada (possibly the US?) go buy it now!

Oh, OH! And the Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss. This book makes me speechless. Suffice to say it uses every fantasy cliche of a hero's upbringing, but is written so that you feel that you've never read it before, until afterwards you realize just how clever Rothfuss was. I just...I honestly cannot explain how amazing it is. Has to be read to be believed.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby justaman » Mon Aug 25, 2008 1:38 am UTC

Mr Pye by Mervyn Peake. Amusing story about this ordinary middle aged guy who does nothing outside of the ordinary and safe who wakes up one morning with wings starting to grow out of his back and how he tries to get rid of them.

I'd like to say Olsen's Book of British Birds, the expurgated version the one without the gannet. Sadly, I have never seen a copy anywhere.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby CogDissident » Mon Aug 25, 2008 4:11 pm UTC

The Dark Shore, by Adam Lee. Very unique magic system, and a completely different setting than most books. Definitely a darker fantasy novel. And extremely violent.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby ian » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:07 pm UTC

Insanetwist wrote:Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke is one of the most fantastic books I have ever had the pleasure to read. Ms. Clarke spent 10 years writing this novel, and it showed. It tells the story of the revival of magic in England, after a period of roughly 300 years when little or no magic was performed. The two people in the title are Gilbert Norrell, the "Greatest Magician of the Age" who is working hard on two things: to restore magic's respected place in England, and to erase all memory of the mysterious 12th century magician the Raven King, the founder of English magical tradition, wherever he can, and vilifying his name where he can't. Jonathan Strange, his student, and then rival, is known as the second greatest magician of the age, but he looks at magic in an entirely different light. This book takes place over an 11 year period from 1806 to 1817, covering such dramatic periods as the Napoleonic Wars.

Now, I must warn you, the first hundred pages or so are...dull. This is true, and I am sorry. But if you can get past that, you won't be able to turn the pages fast enough. This portion of the book is best described in the review from the Washington Post "Many books are to be read, some are to be studied, and a few are meant to be lived in for weeks. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is of the last kind." It is excellent once you can get past the slightly boring opening part. Well, in truth, the first chapter or two is very interesting and entertaining. After that, however, it gets sort of boring, establishing how Mr. Norrell got established in London, got his political contacts, etc., etc. After that, it will become one of the greatest books you have ever read. For those Neil Gaiman fans I know are out there, he recommended it wholeheartedly, calling it "Unquestionably the finest English novel of the fantastic written in the last seventy years."

Well, there you have it. To those of you who do not decide to read this book, that is your decision, and perfectly ok, although I am disappointed. To those who read it, I can only hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

what?! I'm about 140 pages in and loved the first 100. My friend also said it started slow. How odd. I can only anticipatew the awesomeness of the remaining 860 odd pages

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Insanetwist » Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:29 pm UTC

wow...I'm surprised (and happy!) so many people have heard of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. Whenever I ask anyone about it, they've never heard of it. Thank you, internet, for proving I am not alone!

Triggerfish Twist, by Tim Dorsey, is an excellent book about a guy named Jim Davenport, who moves to Tampa, Florida on the (highly) mistaken notion that it's a good place to raise a family, moving across the street from a friendly neighborhood serial killer named Serge A. Storms. I recommend this book to anyone who lives in Florida, has been there, or has ever read or heard anything about this state ever. It's really funny and, while technically part of a series, you don't have to read the other books to get it. Throughout the book, Jim finds out that the (supposedly) nice city of Tampa isn't quite so nice as he thought, having run-ins with coke-heads, robbers, and apathetic car-repair men. It's a really funny book, and I recommend it highly.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby yellie » Thu Aug 28, 2008 12:18 am UTC

Anything written by Ian Irvine! Especially his Three Worlds Cycle series, which is made up of 11 books so far. I've been a diehard fan of his since 2001 and I firmly believe he is one of the most under-appreciated fantasy authors ever. :|

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby colonelspecial » Thu Aug 28, 2008 6:06 am UTC

I picked up a book out of my college library and borrowed it, read it and then bought that copy because it is out of print. It is Visible Amazement by Gale Zoe Garnett. The story revolves around a 14 year old girl who goes to visit California after a major fight with her mom. She is then immersed in an adult world which she loves but feels very young. The way it is written is what hooked me. The author's use of phrasing makes the dialog seem natural.

The second book is Sophie's World by Jostein Gaardner. It is a history of philosophy wrapped around a story of a 15 year old girl who is being taught the philosophy by a mysterious teacher. It is highly complex but the end result is satifying. It was originally written in Norweigian but the English translation seems good. It took me six months to get through the first time and I have since re-read it two more times.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby blue_eyedspacemonkey » Thu Aug 28, 2008 7:04 pm UTC

Only Forward by Michale Marshall Smith. Very surreal, very good. Was introduced to it by my boyfriend, and I read three times straight. I've only read two of his others (One OF Us and Spares) and they're good, but Only Forward it my favourite.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby aro3n » Thu Aug 28, 2008 7:41 pm UTC

Looking For Alaska is by far one of the best books I have read. This book is about a teenage boy that was ostracized from his normal high school but, then he got accepted into a private school in Alabama. He meets others who are misfits like him. The story is about how he and his friends manage (or not) to cope with their problems. Ahhh! There is so much to talk about... I really have no idea where to go... just read it! It is very moving (at least in my own opinion) and is suspenseful. Great read, you (pl.) will not regret reading this!

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Clockwork_Golem » Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:16 am UTC

The Lionwolf trilogy by Tanith Lee and The Winter of the World series by Michael Scott Rohan are both fairly obscure, at least around here.

Lionwolf is the story of a demi-god born into one of many during warring tribes during an ice age, it follows his rise to power amongst the tribes as well as his father's attempts to kill him and his mother. It can be a slow read at times but once it gets going it's very good. Looking back the actual description of the world seems lacking, although it may be deliberately so as the entire world is covered in ice :) The different cultures are very well done though, as is the religion.

The Winter of the World is a very easy-going, but still enjoyable, series. The first three books follow Alv/Elof, a smith with the ability to craft magical artifacts, and his struggles against the gods. I found these books to be the best of the series. The remaining two or three books (I can't remember at the moment) are all independent stories set in different parts of the same world and are still quite good. Unfortunately this series is out of print but I recommend reading them if you can find them.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby ironypoisoning » Fri Aug 29, 2008 8:54 am UTC

My most-loved book of all time is "Green Dolphin Street" by Elizabeth Goudge. It was popular before most of my generation was born, and a movie was made of it that won an Oscar for scenery or special effects, because there's an earthquake in it. But it's basically about two sisters and the man they both love living on the Channel Islands between Britain and France, and how their whole story tumbles out... it's really beautiful, and a large part of it takes place in New Zealand. I remember thinking it was the most amazing book I'd ever read, and practically no one my age has read it, which is a tragedy.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby les jeux sont faites » Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:49 am UTC

Dust and Ashes by Anatoli Rybakov.

Set in Stalinist Russia and follows the lives of some young people living on the Arbat. This is the third book in a trilogy and finds them caught in a war.

Beautiful ending.
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LL Cool J
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby LL Cool J » Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:02 pm UTC

colonelspecial wrote:The second book is Sophie's World by Jostein Gaardner. It is a history of philosophy wrapped around a story of a 15 year old girl who is being taught the philosophy by a mysterious teacher. It is highly complex but the end result is satifying. It was originally written in Norweigian but the English translation seems good. It took me six months to get through the first time and I have since re-read it two more times.


Have you read Gaardner's other books? I prefer The Solitaire Mystery to Sophie's World. Here's the blurb:

Spoiler:
Twelve-year-old Hans Thomas and his father are on a journey to Greece in search of the boy's mother when a series of incidents occur: a dwarf gives Hans Thomas a magnifying glass; a baker gives him a sticky bun containing a book that tells the story of a shipwrecked sailor; a pack of cards seems to have a life of its own; and what of the Joker who looks too deeply and too much?


The plot weaves through separate stories beautifully, and the philosophical aspect is still there, but with more subtlety.

Book I love but noone has ever heard of: 'They Do Things Differently There' by Jan Mark. The basic story is that two friends tell stories to escape the boring town they live in, but it's so much better than it sounds. It's full of puns and absurdism and it's nine shades of excellent. My favourite character is Mr Auger, the most boring man in the world.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Invertebrate » Sat Aug 30, 2008 1:41 pm UTC

Amoeba wrote:You Don't Know Me by David Klass. A wonderful story of domestic violence (that bit's not so wonderful) and growing up that stays lucid and doesn't try too hard to be weighty. It's not aimed at adults, but manages not to be patronising about growing up, which is a relief. I love the little fantasy worlds he builds to escape his reality, and the whole book's just marvellous. I should really reread it.


Oh! This book is incredible! I reread it earlier this year, and it was as amazing as I remember it. The main character is amazingly relatable and really interesting at the same time. He has a pleasingly strange mind.

My tuppence worth is 'Inventing Elliot,' by Graham Gardner. It's about a boy who gets sucked into a strange culture of violence inspired by the Party in 1984. One of the best books I've ever read.

Also, Notes on a Scandal is a wonderful book. Incredibly cynical and painfully incisive. The film is good too, but I would advise reading the book first, if you haven't already seen the film.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby colonelspecial » Tue Sep 02, 2008 3:03 am UTC

@_Jess, I have read Solitaire Mystery but didn't like it as much as Sophie's World. It seemed rushed compared with SW.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby LL Cool J » Tue Sep 02, 2008 11:07 am UTC

colonelspecial wrote:@_Jess, I have read Solitaire Mystery but didn't like it as much as Sophie's World. It seemed rushed compared with SW.


:D Thumbs up, I was just wondering.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Malice » Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:01 am UTC

"We're All In This Together", a collection by Owen King (Stephen's son). The title story is a coming-of-age novella set during the 2004 election season, and is one of the best in its genre I've ever read. The remaining stories are mostly exceedingly strange.

Oddly enough, another son of a great writer: Richard Christian Matheson, who writes extremely minimalist short stories, most of them horror, all of them fucking fantastic. He's got various collections.

Richard Yates' "Revolutionary Road", which will get a lot more press when the movie arrives--be the only guy on your block to own a copy without "now a major motion picture" slapped on the front. The story doesn't matter (basically, the disintegration of a family in '55 American suburbia--sort of a period piece American Beauty); what matters is the prose. Rev Road is one of the 10 best-written novels I've ever read (along with Fight Club, High Fidelity, and A Scanner Darkly).

Lots of people may have heard of Christopher Priest, who wrote the novel "The Prestige", which became the Christopher Nolan film; fewer have taken the time to read this astoundingly excellent puzzle-box of a book, and fewer still realize that Priest has been writing weird science fiction and drama (in a literary way) for decades--"The Glamour", for instance.

Other books of this nature: "Clown Girl", a funny/sad romance by Monica Drake, Koji Suzuki's "Ring" trilogy (whence numerous film adaptations, including Gore Verbinski's horror masterpiece), the extremely engaging "Soon I Will Be Invincible" (if a single person still doesn't know about it, this isn't in vain), a novel from the perspectives of a supervillain and hero, and pretty much everything Eric Garcia's ever written (most notable the series beginning with "Anonymous Rex", which consists of detective novels that happen to star dinosaurs who happen to have a lot of sex, which is even more awesome than it sounds).

Oh, and Harlan Ellison. People seem mostly to have forgotten about him, and most of his books are now out of print. But seek them out. Motherfucker could write.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Brianm » Thu Sep 04, 2008 7:07 pm UTC

I second Only Forward. Spares was a bit disappointing because it reused so many ideas from it - I suspect if I had read it first, I might prefer it, but Only Forward won me over for the way it went into completely unexpected twists.

Another series I really like that seems criminally unheard of is PC Hodgell's Godstalk series. These are IMHO the best fantasy series currently going. The one downside is that the author's rate of publishing makes GRR Martin look like Isaac Asimov. (Started in 1982, forth book only published a couple of years ago. Ten years between the last few books.)

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby flummerina » Sat Sep 06, 2008 9:42 pm UTC

White Apples, by Jonathan Carroll. Really, everything by Jonathan Carroll: he's probably my favorite author, and no-one recognizes him. He's smart, he's a fount of splendidly weird ideas, his characters are great, and his prose is full of completely random moments of absolute beauty. The back of the books have good reviews by Neil Gaiman, Stephen King, and Stanislaw Lem. I want him to be well-known and he isn't and I don't understand why. Read him.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby apeman5291 » Sat Sep 06, 2008 11:43 pm UTC

Pendragon by D.J. MacHale.

A series of 10 novels about Bobby, who discovers he is destined to save the universe from implosion by traveling to different "territories" and keeping them from tipping down the path to oblivion. A bit kid-ish, but I'd classify it as a guilty pleasure. Once you read one, you're hooked for all ten.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby bennyprofane » Sun Sep 07, 2008 1:52 am UTC

Just about everything by Kobo Abe, Kenzaburo Oe, and Ryunosuke Akutagawa is ignored in the west, it seems, which is quite unfortunate.

Abe is sort of like Kafka, Chandler, Beckett, and Dick having an Asian love-child and setting him lose upon the world. Woman in the Dunes is the easiest book by him to find, but what's really worth reading are his plays and three of his novels: The Kangaroo Notebooks, Secret Rendezvous, and The Box Man. Seriously good writer, probably one of the most under-rated and talented from the west.

Kenzaburo Oe was a Nobel prize winner, and his work shows it--his later novels can get kind of stuffy and slow, but his earlier work, especially Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids and Teach Us To Outgrow Our Madness, reflect a serious genius in his craft.

Ryunosuke Akutagawa is to Japanese short stories as Balzac is to them in the West. He innovated the form, and was very masterful and craftslike in his approach to writing. I like to think of him as Natsume Soseki meets H. P. Lovecraft.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby ponzerelli » Wed Sep 10, 2008 1:31 am UTC

The Codex by Douglas Preston

Preston's other novels (Relic, The Ice Limit, The Cabinet of Curiosities [haven't read any of those yet]) have been best sellers but I don't know anyone else that has read this novel.

A treasure hunter/ tomb robber named Maxwell Broadbent dissappears along with all of his collected treasures and leaves a message for his three sons telling them that he has buried himself along with his treasure "somewhere in the world". The treasure is worth half a billion dollars so the secret isn't kept for long and others join the search.

I thought it was a very entertaining read, reminded me of Indiana Jones in some parts.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Aequitas » Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:57 am UTC

A book series that doesn't seem to get much love outside of wotmania.com is the Malazan Book of the Fallen (it's the name of a series). Malazan is a grittier fantasy series that doesn't have a lot of pure good or pure evil characters, from what I've read of it. It Chronicles a chaotic era of the Malazan Empire. The author doesn't ever tell you anything, electing to constantly show, making it a harder read. But, I love it.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby raptor.fortress » Fri Sep 12, 2008 3:04 am UTC

Jock of the Bushveld.

Amazing read, It might be hard to get a copy of though. Ebay might have a few.
There is no friend as loyal as a book.
- Ernest Hemingway.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby got.oblivion » Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:57 am UTC

J-Pod by Douglas Coupland

Many here may identify with this book. Its a cynical view on life through the eyes of a group of four people who have no morals. All brought together by video games and slacking off.

Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl

Book about a girl's senior year in High school and the tragedies and lessons the go along with it. A great read and is set up real neat.
Soaring on the wings of the Oblivion.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Gazing Rabbit » Sat Sep 13, 2008 10:59 am UTC

Not a book but a writer. Karel Čapek (copied the name from wikipedia, no idea how it's pronounced), was a Czech sci-fo writer between 1920 to 1940. He's the one who created the word 'robot' in his play R.U.R.. The thing I like the most about his books is how much they are accurate today, seventy to eighty years later.
Any spelling and/or grammar mistakes in the above post are due to Israel's defective education system. Not that there should be any, but it's always better to blame someone else.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby ironypoisoning » Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:29 pm UTC

got.oblivion wrote:Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl

Book about a girl's senior year in High school and the tragedies and lessons the go along with it. A great read and is set up real neat.


Good story that circulated among my friends at college a year or two ago. I liked it too, but the ending was super-sad, IMHO.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby livelyness » Sun Sep 14, 2008 8:41 am UTC

Wanted to voice a second for "name of the wind" Very well crafted book. The first person element was also an incredibly well thought out touch.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby raequiem » Sat Sep 20, 2008 12:45 am UTC

Anything Mercedes Lackey, especially the numerous Velgarth trilogies. I don't think it's that no one's heard of them, as much as it is that everyone heard of them about a decade ago, and doesn't care anymore. These books are amazing, go read them now.
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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby psyck0 » Sat Sep 20, 2008 1:25 am UTC

The Citadel, by A.J. Cronin. One of the best authors ever that no one's ever heard of. My favourite book. It just follows a doctor from his path starting out as an eager idealist to his old age, and does it SO WELL.

Also, Fugitive Pieces by Ann Michaels. Poetry in book form. The story is great, but ignore the story and focus on the language and the novel is STILL amazing. The only poet I read for pleasure.

colonelspecial wrote:The second book is Sophie's World by Jostein Gaardner. It is a history of philosophy wrapped around a story of a 15 year old girl who is being taught the philosophy by a mysterious teacher. It is highly complex but the end result is satifying. It was originally written in Norweigian but the English translation seems good. It took me six months to get through the first time and I have since re-read it two more times.


Really? REALLY? I was FORCED to read that book for a class and didn't get more than 80 pages in. I thought it was nothing more than a textbook that attempted to disguise itself as a novel by tacking on a plot. The plot itself made no sense to me and the musings of the girl were moronic. I DO have a strong bias against philosophy, but no one else in the class got more than 150 pages in, either. I do know ONE other person who likes it, though.

I would be interested to see what draws you to it.
Last edited by psyck0 on Sat Sep 20, 2008 2:03 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Books you like that no one else has heard of

Postby Exotria » Sat Sep 20, 2008 1:49 am UTC

Myst: The Book of Atrus by Rand and Robyn Miller with David Wingrove

This book was my favorite book throughout my childhood and I own three copies. One was my original paperback, second was another paperback so I could have one that wasn't falling apart from overuse, and third was the hardbound version that is beautiful and has the edges of the pages tinted rose. It is beautiful.

The actual content of the book is very intriguing. I've never come across a work quite like it. It's a prequel to the Myst series of PC games which you should all have heard of and played. The beauty of the games was seamlessly transported onto the page. There are so many morality issues hidden in it with some powerful... foils, I think the term is? The characters aren't really the most believable, but I found myself connecting with them regardless. The only problem is that I haven't been able to have a satisfying read out of it in the past several years. I read through it so many times in my childhood that a lot of the book's sentences kind of ingrained themselves in my head, and it's a little bit uncomfortable to have all my eight year old mental images of the scenery and happenings forcing their way into my head again, so I never get very far any time I try to read it. That's what happens when you're a kid and don't know what everything is... you create scenes in your head that become definitive of the book even if it isn't described that way in it.

Yeah, go read it.
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