Robert Silverberg

A slow, analog alternative to the internet

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
rat4000
r/ratsgonewild
Posts: 451
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 7:51 pm UTC

Robert Silverberg

Postby rat4000 » Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:32 pm UTC

Search revealed nothing, and this is certainly an author worthy of a thread. My own experiences:

I read Kingdoms of the Wall and enjoyed it. It wasn't a stunningly awesome book, but it was a fairly good one. Not particularly imaginitive - it would have worked just as well with humans, he simply needed another world - but a wonderful study on how groups work and how people behave when confronted with new and constantly varying challenges. The revelation at the end was a final challenge, quite awesome, and I would say its main purpose was showing that one has to go through a lot to be able to accept a lot in the end.

I read Dying Inside and I loved it. It was a stunningly awesome book, even though I couldn't really understand it on the level a well-read person, or - even better - a person with literary (is this a word?) education would, because of the constant references to classic novels and poetry. I suspect that if one started analysing the book, one would find even more things that make it awesome, links between the quotes that always pop up and the events which transpire in the chapters that the quotes appear in. I suspect one would see how great the style, with the varying narrators, is; that one would find out even more about Selig just from the difference between the third- and first-person narrators, or from the papers he writes. I will probably read the book several more times; it deserves it, and I imagine its literary value will grow with the amount that I have read, as well as my level of education.

I would like to ask you what you think of Silverberg, what you've read that he's written, and so on...

and also a rather more specific question, which might start the thread off: how do you interpret the very last paragraph of Dying Inside? I take it to mean that
Spoiler:
while he was dying - while his power was dying - he was actually living a more intense life than ever before. After all, he had to come to terms with the loss of his power and build a new way of life - develop, and change, and grow, which is to me the best definition of life. He had to resolve all those memories we read about, too... It also fits the quote we have there (Living, we fret; dying, we live), as well as the mood in the last pages of the book - the silence, the white and the gray, which are calm and slightly melancholic colors, and the events in the last chapter. However, I think I might well be missing something - I think, in fact, that my interpretation is inadequate - and I would love to hear your opinions.

Mzyxptlk
Posts: 513
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:41 am UTC

Re: Robert Silverberg

Postby Mzyxptlk » Wed Apr 15, 2009 6:49 am UTC

I read Starborne and wasn't particularly impressed. Though it was certainly an entertaning book to read, it wouldn't make any top lists.
"Once upon a time, an infinite number of people lived perfect, blissful, eternal lives."

User avatar
rat4000
r/ratsgonewild
Posts: 451
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2009 7:51 pm UTC

Re: Robert Silverberg

Postby rat4000 » Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:39 am UTC

I've heard that Silverberg has one insanely strong period where everything he writes is a masterpiece, and the rest of his writing is, while not bad, not awesome.

User avatar
Grop
Posts: 1998
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Robert Silverberg

Postby Grop » Wed Apr 15, 2009 1:58 pm UTC

I read The Man in the Maze (1969) and The Face of the Waters (1991). I liked both, but that was ~10 years ago, so my tastes may have changed.

I think The Man in the Maze was really worth reading, though.


Return to “Books”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests