books you read for school and actually enjoyed

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ranthlor
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books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby ranthlor » Fri Oct 30, 2009 1:02 am UTC

Most of the books forced on us in school are intolerable, but some are actually really good. Like a few years ago I read "The Book Thief" and found it to be pretty awesome, and it was a more recent novel by a new author.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Tomah » Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:07 am UTC

Well, the only ones I can think of right now were:

- The Lord of Flies;
- A short story of Edgar Allan Poe (The Black Cat). Though I'm not sure if this counts as a book, I enjoyed it a lot;
- Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas (I believe it's known as Epitaph of a Small Winner in the U.S, no?).

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Fri Oct 30, 2009 5:09 pm UTC

Barney's Version, by Mordecai Richler.

This book is of course incredibly inappropriate for the vast majority of English classes, but I'm glad I had an English class where I was obliged to read it, as I might have never picked it up otherwise. Sensational!

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby charliepanayi » Fri Oct 30, 2009 7:52 pm UTC

When I was in my first year of Secondary School I was given Wyrd Sisters and Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett for English class - and 14 years later he's still one of my favourite authors.

And I read Of Mice and Men a year after, which I loved.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:01 am UTC

The Tell-Tale Heart
The Masque of the Red Death
The Raven
The Phantom Tollbooth
The Silver Crown
Travel Far, Pay No Fare
Flowers for Algernon
Go Ask Alice
The Crucible
Charlotte's Web

And a few others I'll have to look up later on...
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TommyTumnus
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TommyTumnus » Sat Oct 31, 2009 4:32 am UTC

I could list many books here... It would be quicker for me to list only the ones I didn't like, but I won't.

The top of the list, though, for ones I liked, would have to be The Great Gatsby by far. That book was amazing (I'm not sure I even know how--all I know is that I loved it).

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby mmmcannibalism » Sun Nov 01, 2009 6:03 am UTC

Lord of the Flies
Hamlet

(english teacher suggested)
Siddhartha
Dracula

There was plenty of other stuff, but those are the best ones.
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folkhero
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby folkhero » Sun Nov 01, 2009 7:01 am UTC

One Flew over the Cuckoo Nest
Death of a Salesman
Hamlet
A Doll's House
Probably more that I cant think of right now.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby lukS » Sun Nov 01, 2009 7:15 am UTC

I liked Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift
The Time Machine H. G. Wells
The Count of Monte Cristo Alexandre dumas
The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
and of course, 1984 by George Orwell which i reread when Bush was president and thought he was taking instructions from it. :)

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby axilog14 » Sun Nov 01, 2009 8:00 am UTC

On the order of poems and short stories there are too frickin' many to count. But these books and plays particularly stood out for me:

Isabel Allende's House of the Spirits - high school book report, liked it probably because I identified with a lot of the characters in it
Albert Camus' The Plague - recommended by my Philosophy II prof when I was becoming too outspoken for his class
Yasmina Reza's 'Art' - performed it in Contemporary Literature, recommended by one of our favoritest college professors ever. There are still days when I can swear I am Yvan.
Macbeth - if only because we finally got a Literature-trained professor who could discuss Shakespeare properly (and by "properly" I mean "will not bore her students to death by misleading them into thinking Shakespeare had always been a school-sanctioned archaic old fart"... so to speak)
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby oxy » Mon Nov 02, 2009 2:06 am UTC

I thought that The Crucible, Rozencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead and All Quiet on the Western Front were brilliant books, and throughly enjoyed them.

In the "pretty good" category are:
The Sun Also Rises
The Grapes of Wrath
Lord of the Flies
Macbeth
Hamlet
Chronicle of a Death Foretold

edit:
Animal Farm


And probably some more I'm not thinking of. Especially dramas, which are more my style.

Most of the rest of the stuff we read in school is horrible. No wonder adult americans don't read... I'm just glad my parents introduced me to good literature early.
Last edited by oxy on Mon Nov 02, 2009 5:24 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Nov 02, 2009 4:07 am UTC

oxy wrote:Most of the rest of the stuff we read in school is horrible. No wonder adult americans don't read... I'm just glad my parents introduced me to good literature early.


Same here. I remember my mom making me read "Tom Sawyer" when I was in 4th grade, and while I didn't enjoy it for the most part, thinking back I actually did. Especially the way how Tom conned everybody into thinking that whitewashing the fence was the. best. fun. EVAR. and that Huck bullied some of them into doing the fence.

I think I had said this in the counterpoint thread of this thread, but I think the reason why not many American adults don't read is because in school they weren't encouraged enough to read, and they weren't allowed to choose what they wanted to read. A lot of it was forced onto them, and most, if not all, of it was insufferable. While there were a few gems out there, mostly there was crap.

I remember in 6th Grade my teacher allowed us to read whatever books we wanted, which allowed us to read more of what actually drew us in, instead of reading something that would bore us to tears. I remember reading primarily the Ramona Quimby books, along with a few other books our library had, including a few paranormal/ghost books, some crafts book from the 1970s, and a few other books. Had this continued on through high school, and had my high school had a better selection of both fiction and non-fiction, I think I would have been more of an avid bookworm today than I am.

One book I remember my 7th grade teacher reading to us was "The Burning Questions of Bingo Brown", in which a kid wrote questions in a journal he was asked to start keeping in school, along with his classmates, and he had particular quirks. One was that he had a peculiar path to walk to the pencil sharpener, which allowed him to read every student's paper on the way. When they began writing their journals, he reads over one girl's shoulder who wrote "Dear Dairy", and in another chapter they were writing to some celebrity. I remember that the regular teacher rode a motorcycle, and that at one point he has an accident, and the substitute takes two students a day to visit him in the hospital.

One thing I used to do with books, especially the Ramona Quimby books, as well as some of the books our teachers read to us in class (6th Grade - The Silver Crown; 7th Grade - Burning Questions...) is whenever a scenario took place, I envisioned it taking place in a house or apartment I lived in at the time I was the same age as the character in the book, or I would envision it taking place in some other house or place, whether it was a friend's house as my own house, or at school, or in a store, or a restaurant, or in the woods somewhere. For example, when we had to read "The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe", I envisioned Lucy finding the wardrobe in one of the back bedrooms of my great-grandparents' old farmhouse, where they did have two wardrobes, one of them being rather big like the one in the book. Nowadays I can't do that anymore, unless I try hard enough.
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Jorpho
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Mon Nov 02, 2009 4:22 am UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:I remember in 6th Grade my teacher allowed us to read whatever books we wanted, which allowed us to read more of what actually drew us in, instead of reading something that would bore us to tears. I remember reading primarily the Ramona Quimby books, along with a few other books our library had, including a few paranormal/ghost books, some crafts book from the 1970s, and a few other books.
Nothing wrong with those. Some would argue they're not really suited to a sixth-grade reading level, but that never stopped me. (Dear Mr. Henshaw was well-deserving of its Newberry.)

However, I suspect there are a good many kids out there who, given complete freedom, would gravitate towards the latest mass-market crap about Hannah Montana or the Jonas Brothers or whatever's going these days.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby psychosomaticism » Mon Nov 02, 2009 5:12 am UTC

Liked The Great Gatsby., Animal Farm was alright, but not Orwell's best, Brave New World was pretty interesting, and The Outsiders was readable at the time (but is a bit juvenile now).

College freshman English (if we can include that) was pretty good, because it was mostly short stories that were actually adult level, not that I can think of any I liked at the moment...

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby folkhero » Mon Nov 02, 2009 7:32 am UTC

Jorpho wrote:However, I suspect there are a good many kids out there who, given complete freedom, would gravitate towards the latest mass-market crap about Hannah Montana or the Jonas Brothers or whatever's going these days.

I remember at one point in 12th grade we got to choose a book from some sort of AP English list, I chose "Brave New World", which is probably another one I could add to my list of actually enjoyed. Maybe lists like this could be made for lower levels of readers as well. It would be a mixture of free choice with certain limits.

Also, I think even reading enjoyable tripe is better than being forced to read something that is actively aggravating. In middle school we got reading time and points for reading reading whatever books we wanted. I mostly read a bunch of Star Wars books that had little to no literary merit, but at least I was reading and enjoying it and a better quality book would get in there every once in a while. Going into high school, my honors English class had some required summer reading. One of the books was "Cry the Beloved Country" which no 13 year old should ever be forced to read ever. I started reading that at the beginning of the summer and didn't read anything else for the whole summer until the week before school started when I finished my required reading. It scarred my enjoyment of reading so badly that I read hardly anything I didn't have to for about a year.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TheAmazingRando » Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:38 am UTC

folkhero wrote:I remember at one point in 12th grade we got to choose a book from some sort of AP English list, I chose "Brave New World", which is probably another one I could add to my list of actually enjoyed. Maybe lists like this could be made for lower levels of readers as well. It would be a mixture of free choice with certain limits.
I remember having something like that as well. Pretty sure I chose "The Sound and the Fury," which I loved and which got me into all sorts of literature I love today. As far as stuff that was actually assigned, I think my favorite was Moby Dick. I've been meaning to re-read it for a while, since I loved it at the time. I had a great teacher who actually managed to get most of the class into it and enjoying it.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:53 am UTC

folkhero wrote:I remember at one point in 12th grade we got to choose a book from some sort of AP English list, I chose "Brave New World", which is probably another one I could add to my list of actually enjoyed. Maybe lists like this could be made for lower levels of readers as well. It would be a mixture of free choice with certain limits.
Not a bad idea, but methinks many students would still enthusiastically seek out whichever book was the shortest or easiest. And of course it would mean more work for the potentially inexperienced teacher.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Reamsie » Thu Nov 05, 2009 2:56 am UTC

I'd have to say my favorites from high school were Flowers for Algernon, Animal Farm, and The Five People You Meet in Heaven (I still own this one!). Definitely very good books if I must say so myself :)

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby littlebuddy » Thu Nov 05, 2009 4:11 am UTC

A Wrinkle in Time
The Jungle

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Guy_At_A_Keyboard » Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:28 pm UTC

High School:
Romeo and Juliet
Ishmael by Daniel Quinn
Oedipus Rex
Antigone
1984
A lot of poetry by John Donne
Macbeth
How Green Was My Valley (I was the only one who seemed to like it)
On The Road
Crime and Punishment (I was whining and moaning the whole time, but when all was said and done, I loved it).
Hamlet
Angela's Ashes
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

College:
Brave New World
Neuromancer
The Popol Vuh
The Golem by Gustav Meyrink
More John Donne
Paradise Lost

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:36 pm UTC

Guy_At_A_Keyboard wrote:Neuromancer
And for what class was that assigned reading? Why was it assigned? Do tell.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Guy_At_A_Keyboard » Fri Nov 06, 2009 9:28 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:
Guy_At_A_Keyboard wrote:Neuromancer
And for what class was that assigned reading? Why was it assigned? Do tell.


A First-Year Seminar on Utopias and Dystopias--We went from Thomas More to Cyberpunk. We also got to watch Blade Runner.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby ballos » Sat Nov 07, 2009 12:37 am UTC

my eighth grade teacher recommended 1984 to me, so technically i didn't read it for school.

i did enjoy:
To Kill A Mockingbird
The Odyssey
Twelfth Night
The Great Gatsby
Tom Sawyer
Hamlet
Macbeth
The Hobbit

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Sat Nov 07, 2009 2:19 am UTC

Guy_At_A_Keyboard wrote:
Jorpho wrote:
Guy_At_A_Keyboard wrote:Neuromancer
And for what class was that assigned reading? Why was it assigned? Do tell.
A First-Year Seminar on Utopias and Dystopias--We went from Thomas More to Cyberpunk. We also got to watch Blade Runner.
How odd. I don't know what I'd say Neuromancer is really about, but "a society" is the last thing that comes to mind.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:32 am UTC

Jorpho wrote:
folkhero wrote:I remember at one point in 12th grade we got to choose a book from some sort of AP English list, I chose "Brave New World", which is probably another one I could add to my list of actually enjoyed. Maybe lists like this could be made for lower levels of readers as well. It would be a mixture of free choice with certain limits.
Not a bad idea, but methinks many students would still enthusiastically seek out whichever book was the shortest or easiest. And of course it would mean more work for the potentially inexperienced teacher.


Two words: Cliff's Notes.

I remember when I went into 12th Grade they started up the summer reading lists prior to that. Many of us hadn't read any of the books, due to being too busy having fun or working during summer vacation. At a last-minute attempt, many students bought the Cliff's Notes booklets that gave a general synopsis of the book, with a brief summary and description of the characters. I wish I had read a couple of them. Would have been better-prepared for the tests we had to take.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby BlueNight » Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:32 pm UTC

I read many books in school.

Only one caught my attention and engrossed me: Johnny Got His Gun. I was enthralled by the descriptions of a man whose interface with the world had been removed except for the sense of touch and one mode of communication. The political stuff didn't make any impression on me at all; for me, it was a hard science fiction book.

Most books that were assigned were slow slogs through dense masses of text about humans who didn't turn into anything, didn't go anywhere other than land and the surface of the sea, and didn't do much besides talk and hurt each other in various ways. Truly an enlightening vision of humanity. </sarcasm>

Several teachers did have books that were lying about their classrooms, not assigned. I remember reading the novelization of Spaceballs several times. I also read and enjoyed Animal Farm and Of Mice And Men because a teacher had them in the room, and I had heard of them.

The books I brought to school were more interesting than those assigned. I borrowed books (mostly Star Trek novels) from the city library, and with my meager allowance bought a few. The books from the Scholastic book fairs were the best, as were school library books. I mostly borrowed and bought licensed tie-ins, such as novelizations and Star Trek novels.

Why do I mention these last few books? Because I read them at school, at lunch and during classtime.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby xerkdaniels » Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:02 am UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:
Jorpho wrote:
folkhero wrote:I remember at one point in 12th grade we got to choose a book from some sort of AP English list, I chose "Brave New World", which is probably another one I could add to my list of actually enjoyed. Maybe lists like this could be made for lower levels of readers as well. It would be a mixture of free choice with certain limits.
Not a bad idea, but methinks many students would still enthusiastically seek out whichever book was the shortest or easiest. And of course it would mean more work for the potentially inexperienced teacher.


Two words: Cliff's Notes.

I remember when I went into 12th Grade they started up the summer reading lists prior to that. Many of us hadn't read any of the books, due to being too busy having fun or working during summer vacation. At a last-minute attempt, many students bought the Cliff's Notes booklets that gave a general synopsis of the book, with a brief summary and description of the characters. I wish I had read a couple of them. Would have been better-prepared for the tests we had to take.
I think Cliff Notes (or Sparknotes, whichever you prefer) are the new way to read for college and high school student with no time on their hands.
Last edited by xerkdaniels on Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:36 pm UTC, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby xerkdaniels » Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:10 am UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:The Tell-Tale Heart
The Masque of the Red Death
The Raven
The Phantom Tollbooth
The Silver Crown
Travel Far, Pay No Fare
Flowers for Algernon
Go Ask Alice
The Crucible
Charlotte's Web

And a few others I'll have to look up later on...

The Phantom Tollbooth should be required reading for all English and/or Linguistic Majors. Can't have poetry without Edgar Allen Poe. You might want to add "Annabel Lee" and The Tell-Tale Heart to your list.
Tomah wrote:A short story of Edgar Allan Poe (The Black Cat).
Except that story is particularly grotesque.
Last edited by xerkdaniels on Sun Nov 08, 2009 5:39 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby ameretrifle » Sun Nov 08, 2009 7:36 am UTC

I was the only person in my class who could stand "I Heard the Owl Call My Name". In this list, I am including the teacher. She actually canceled the book report on it, they hated it that much. I was mildly disappointed-- it wasn't my favorite book ever, but it was better than a certain other piece of crap we had to read that year... One of the maybe three books I've ever thrown across a room. In college:

Jane Eyre
Persuasion
Persepolis
Wide Sargasso Sea

and probably others that escape me at the moment. I also have a bibliography project this semester that's been getting me to read a lot of good kids' books, like "Last Summer With Maizon", "Artemis Fowl", and "Wee Free Men"... technically that counts, right? :D

(As to series books-- I'll have to see if I can find some freely available citations on this, but see if your library has a copy of a book called "Reading Matters". It has a whole bunch of stuff on reading habits and the importance of reading for pleasure. If kids don't enjoy reading, they won't keep doing it, simple as that. And if they don't keep getting that practice on their own, they won't get as good at it. Double that when you're considering someone who has actual trouble reading.)

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby xerkdaniels » Sun Nov 08, 2009 3:59 pm UTC

ameretrifle wrote:I also have a bibliography project this semester that's been getting me to read a lot of good kids' books, like "Last Summer With Maizon", "Artemis Fowl", and "Wee Free Men"... technically that counts, right? :D

Actually Artemis Fowl (Eoin Colfer) is shelved in the young adult section. If you want to read some good kids books than pick up Lemony Snicket's (Daniel Handler) series "A Series of Unfortunate Events": it contains wit comparable to the masters who made Monty Python.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby .cheeseofdoom. » Sun Nov 08, 2009 4:21 pm UTC

I'm not quite sure if it counts, but I've been required to read some sort of book every year, of my choice.

The one's I've liked:
Fahrenheit 451
The Catcher in the Rye
A Clockwork Orange

I'm into psychological type books, and books that make you think about them more than others.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Guy_At_A_Keyboard » Sun Nov 08, 2009 4:34 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:
Guy_At_A_Keyboard wrote:
Jorpho wrote:
Guy_At_A_Keyboard wrote:Neuromancer
And for what class was that assigned reading? Why was it assigned? Do tell.
A First-Year Seminar on Utopias and Dystopias--We went from Thomas More to Cyberpunk. We also got to watch Blade Runner.
How odd. I don't know what I'd say Neuromancer is really about, but "a society" is the last thing that comes to mind.

We finished with Neuromancer as an example of post-dystopian literature, as the professor referred to it. Honestly, during that period, I was busy with my final paper for the course (on the history of the internet and the early utopian ideals of online community), as well as un-fucking my sleep schedule.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Internetmeme » Sun Nov 08, 2009 9:05 pm UTC

-Lord of the Flies
-A Streetcar Named Desire (although again, a "rape scene" that I did not read is apparently there. Somewhere. Like LotF)
-Thanatopsis
-The Devil and Tom Walker
-Romeo and Juliet
-The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
-Hamlet (that is the one where this guy's dad
Spoiler:
dies and comes back as a ghost, and then the main character holds of the skull and talks to it, right?
)
-that one poem that compares fog to a cat, it's 2-3 stanzas, if that
-Milkweed
-Chinese Cinderella
-Frankenstein
-Probably a lot of others here. The sad thing is that I can only remember mainly the things we over analyzed that made me hate them. I'm sure I would have loved a lot more had we not over analyzed them TO FUCKING DEATH.
Spoiler:

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Quantum Sunshine » Sun Nov 08, 2009 10:03 pm UTC

The only book we read in school that I actually enjoyed was probably Fahrenheit 451. I might have enjoyed some of the other books we read, if I had read them on my own because I tend to not like the way they teach things at school.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:31 am UTC

ameretrifle wrote:I was the only person in my class who could stand "I Heard the Owl Call My Name". In this list, I am including the teacher. She actually canceled the book report on it, they hated it that much. I was mildly disappointed-- it wasn't my favorite book ever, but it was better than a certain other piece of crap we had to read that year...
That was one of the better ones that I can recall being assigned for summer reading, now that you mention it.
.cheeseofdoom. wrote:A Clockwork Orange
Yeah, from what I know of that book, no teacher would ever assign it directly.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Flightless_bird » Mon Nov 09, 2009 6:05 pm UTC

Candide by Voltaire. We read it recently it's a bit tough because things happen in a very fast pace but the irony can't be beaten :)
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby .cheeseofdoom. » Tue Nov 10, 2009 3:33 am UTC

Jorpho wrote:
ameretrifle wrote:Yeah, from what I know of that book, no teacher would ever assign it directly.

I would guess that to be correct.
I also want to find GEB, from what I've heard, it'd be a good book for me.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Nyarlathotep » Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:58 pm UTC

I find as a whole books are far more entertaining in college, especially when you go to a school where the English department considers having a minor in Piracy.

That said, I was very surprised recently to find that Virginia Woolf's The Waves is actually good. Normally I quite loathe Virginia Woolf, but this book was amazing, at least up until the last chapter. Truly beautiful stream of consciousness work.

I'm also currently in a survey course that reads nothing but Edgar Allan Poe, which ranges from "fun" to "Poe, don't write novels; you aren't good at them." Class is taught by the professor who (jokingly. Mostly.) proposed the Piracy minor, and who last year took an entire class on a trip through Europe to study postmodernism as it relates to Dracula.

I still hold, however, that both the most wonderful thing to happen to me in a college level English course and the most horrible was reading House of Leaves. That, however, was my own damn fault for choosing it as the subject for my senior thesis.

On the other hand, the SAME Pirate Professor actually teaches House of Leaves as part of his January term course on Postmodern Horror. So...

... Basically, that professor is the best person ever, and... yeah.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby rnbguru » Tue Nov 10, 2009 7:31 pm UTC

In the younger grades, there were some real great ones. The Giver, Where The Red Fern Grows, Catcher in the Rye, Hamlet.

My favs though were when they gave you the summer reading list. On those I read Fallen Angels, Alas Babylon and On The Beach which all kicked ass.

In college, Love in the Time of Cholera was probably the best.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby NecklaceOfShadow » Tue Nov 10, 2009 11:42 pm UTC

I loved Anna Karenina. The amount of depth in that book is just awe-inspiring.

We read selected parts of the Odyssey in ninth grade and that inspired me to read the whole thing. T'was fairly good. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was good after I went after and reread it when school was over. Homecoming by Cynthia Voigt was a really interesting book to me and so was Roll of Thunder, Be My Cry.

My ninth grade teacher inspired me to read the Inferno while talking about Romeo and Juliet and my current teacher got me to read Lolita while discussing Anna Karenina. One Hundred Years of Solitude was a good book, but it was extremely confusing. Love in the Time of Cholera is shaping out to be a really good book.

I read Annabel Lee in middle school and it's still my favorite poem, with Charge of the Light Brigade following close after.
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