books you read for school and actually enjoyed

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Dustin
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Dustin » Fri Apr 09, 2010 12:49 am UTC

Another statement of approval for Slaughterhouse Five to throw on the pile.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby modularblues » Sun Apr 11, 2010 8:45 am UTC

Catch-22, A Tale of Two Cities, Pride and Prejudice, A Prayer for Owen Meany

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TheMaestro » Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:56 pm UTC

A Separate Peace - John Knowles
1984 - George Orwell
Catcher In The Rye - J.D. Salinger
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Fri Apr 16, 2010 4:05 pm UTC

TheMaestro wrote:A Separate Peace - John Knowles
I demand an explanation!

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TheMaestro » Fri Apr 16, 2010 4:11 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:
TheMaestro wrote:A Separate Peace - John Knowles
I demand an explanation!


In what way? You didn't like it?
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Fri Apr 16, 2010 5:31 pm UTC

TheMaestro wrote:In what way? You didn't like it?
This is the first I have heard of anyone expressing any kind of fondness for that book.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TheMaestro » Fri Apr 16, 2010 5:53 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:This is the first I have heard of anyone expressing any kind of fondness for that book.


Really? I hadn't heard of it before, but after I got into it, I really enjoyed it.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Fin Archangel » Sat Apr 17, 2010 2:10 am UTC

Kohlliah wrote:Some of my favorites include:

Where the Red Fern Grows
The Giver
Redwall
Ender's Game
Animal Farm
Alas, Babylon
Long Walk to Freedom
The Once and Future King

Ender's Game and Alas, Babylon are both still on my bookshelf and I read them every couple of years. Definitely became favorites of mine.


Holy crap your school's reading list is awesome.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby glitterbug12 » Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:04 pm UTC

My Side of the Mountain, Jean Craighead George - grade 4
Night, Elie Wiesel - grade 8

I'm not old enough to have been assigned any classic literature, or anything much at all yet. But I liked both of those books...

EDIT: Oh, also A Midsummer Night's Dream although the translations from Middle English in the school copy helped with the enjoyment thing a lot.
EDIT OF THE EDIT: Okay, it's not Middle English. My bad. Either my teacher lied, or I wasn't listening.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Wed Apr 21, 2010 7:33 pm UTC

glitterbug12 wrote:EDIT: Oh, also A Midsummer Night's Dream although the translations from Middle English in the school copy helped with the enjoyment thing a lot.
Dude, this is Middle English. Shakespeare did not write in Middle English.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TheMaestro » Wed Apr 21, 2010 8:19 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:
glitterbug12 wrote:EDIT: Oh, also A Midsummer Night's Dream although the translations from Middle English in the school copy helped with the enjoyment thing a lot.
Dude, this is Middle English. Shakespeare did not write in Middle English.


If you are looking for a real example of Middle English, Canterbury Tales is pretty cool, though to understand it at all you need a full translation. Project Gutenberg has a good one.

What's really hard to understand is Old English. I am just glad there isn't much literature from then, or else our textbooks would be filled with this.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Okapi » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:22 pm UTC

I actually did not read it for school, since there were complaints from P.C. parents about it and we stopped after about fifteen pages, but later on I picked it up and actually read it--East of Eden. P.C. parents effing suck. That is one of the best books I've ever read.


Incidentally, A Separate Peace was a bad book, and a bad movie, too, and Shakespeare wrote in Early Modern English--It is different from what we speak today, in subtle ways like pronunciation (so that you sound like a stuck-up Yorkshireman with a pretentioous extra flair), so that again rhymes with rain, for example, which some people still do today, and in ways like letter replacement--"Th" at the beginning of a word is "Y," "S" at the end of a present-tense verb is replaced by "Eth," words like "Thee" and "Thou" and "Thy" are used, and other small things. But I believe they are all necessary parts to fully receive the impact of the poetry. Shakespeare is one of the few poets who ever lived that was any good, and so I don't think his language should be diluted.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Fin Archangel » Fri Apr 23, 2010 1:01 am UTC

glitterbug12 wrote:My Side of the Mountain, Jean Craighead George - grade 4


Oh my god, I remember how awesome I thought this was when I read it.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby jahwn lemonjello » Sat Jul 10, 2010 2:09 am UTC

Lord of the Flies. I read it for school; it is now one of my favorites.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby uncivlengr » Sat Jul 10, 2010 2:42 am UTC

Fin Archangel wrote:
glitterbug12 wrote:My Side of the Mountain, Jean Craighead George - grade 4


Oh my god, I remember how awesome I thought this was when I read it.
I loved that book, though I didn't read it through school... I went through a phase for about a year when I read that and a bunch of Jim Kjelgaard books about hunting and outdoors and dogs... I'm going to have to see if I can find my copy of My Side of the Mountain next time I'm home.

As for books I read for school, I have to say the one that stuck with me is To Kill a Mockingbird, which thankfully wasn't banned from our curriculum until afterwards. I enjoyed Brave New World to some degree, and really appreciated The Lost Salt Gift of Blood by Aldus Huxley, and No Great Mischief by Alistair MacLeod.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Indubitable. » Sun Jul 11, 2010 4:07 am UTC

I've only read two novels in school (at least, which spring to mind right now) which I actually enjoyed while we were studying them (and those are the first two on the list) but in retrospect, there are some others (as well as plays) which do rather appeal to me. Sadly, in the case of at least one play off the top of my head (Ibsen's A Doll's House), studying it in school has turned me off from it completely due to the sheer amount of rubbish waffle I've had to write about it.

  • 1984 - Orwell
  • Amsterdam - McEwan
  • Lord Of The Flies - Golding
  • A Room With A View - Forster
  • Animal Farm - Orwell
  • The Crucible - Miller

In fact, both Orwellian novels have become something to which my friend and I refer quite often in our conversations; we share an interest in stories about totalitarian regimes (such as those also found in Brave New World and V For Vendetta).
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Sasquatch » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:31 pm UTC

I remember that in elementary school we had to read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Then in middle school, we had to read The Hobbit and some short story about the Dragonriders of Pern. The combination of these books got me into the whole sci-fi/fantasy genre.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:10 pm UTC

Sasquatch wrote:some short story about the Dragonriders of Pern.
Now there's one you don't hear every day. Of course, the short story did win the Hugo. (You do know that said short story became the first chapter of a book that had a whole mess of sequels in the end, right?)

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Sasquatch » Thu Jul 15, 2010 1:23 am UTC

Jorpho wrote:
Sasquatch wrote:some short story about the Dragonriders of Pern.
Now there's one you don't hear every day. Of course, the short story did win the Hugo. (You do know that said short story became the first chapter of a book that had a whole mess of sequels in the end, right?)

To be honest, I forgot what the short story was about, but I read every Pern book I could get my hands on after reading the short story for class.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby melladh » Sun Aug 01, 2010 9:19 am UTC

Well, there's been books I've read for school as in "grab what you want as long as it's from the school library", where I got Terry Pratchett's Hogfather... I'd been reading Pratchett for a few years already, but it was the first book I ever read in english, and I have almost never been able to read a translated book (from english) ever since. And on that basis,

Hogfather, by Terry Pratchett

...yeah, that's all. I mean I really liked Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as well (curriculum book for english class) but the way we had to read certain segments sort of ruined the experience, because I couldn't get to read it in peace.

Mostly, books we had to read for school just ruined the book for me. There have been books that would have been great if I'd gotten to read them in english and on my own, that was thoroughly ruined by school... Because we had a dyslectic in the class, where the problem wasn't as much him being dyslectic as him being a bit of an arse and really lazy, and always pretended to be stupid in front of teachers. So we got to read Lord of the Flies, translated. During class. With an audiotape on in the background, where we were supposed to follow the text in the book at the same time. Speed on the tape turned down to the lowest setting the stereo would allow. In 9th grade! I could have read the entire book in a day, but as it was, it took us an hour to get through ten pages. I believe the book is probably awesome, because it really is my type of book. But I hate it with all my heart.


Sasquatch wrote:I remember that in elementary school we had to read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

... that line just made me feel horribly old.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Apteryx » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:36 am UTC

uncivlengr wrote:
As for books I read for school, I have to say the one that stuck with me is To Kill a Mockingbird, which thankfully wasn't banned from our curriculum until afterwards.



WHAT !.

My goodness, what would possess people to ban Mockingbird?. One of the truly humane books, one of the great pieces of literature.

Why did the wackos want it banned, do you know?.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby TheMaestro » Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:47 pm UTC

Apteryx wrote: why did the wackos want it banned, do you know?.


I do know that a lot of boards banned it because it uses the word 'nigger'.
stupid people.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby melladh » Mon Aug 02, 2010 3:03 pm UTC

Apteryx wrote:Why did the wackos want it banned, do you know?.


Mind you, Fahrenheit 451 was quite well banned as well (possibly for more well founded reasons, I'm not a good judge at what needs to be "kept from our good people") but it's hilarious to ban a book that's essentially about the evils of censorship...
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Aiwendil42 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 5:55 pm UTC

Censoring an anti-censorship book is at least consistent (if one is pro-censorship). Banning an anti-racist book because it has a racist word in it is just irrational and kind of self-defeating.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Jorpho » Mon Aug 02, 2010 8:40 pm UTC

TheMaestro wrote:
Apteryx wrote: why did the wackos want it banned, do you know?.
I do know that a lot of boards banned it because it uses the word 'nigger'.
stupid people.
Indeed, the reasoning is obvious. Huckleberry Finn gets targeted for much the same reason.

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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Apteryx » Tue Aug 03, 2010 12:41 am UTC

But even the children characters are shown to understand that people are just people, and the "nigger" attitude is just prejudice.
Basically people in the book are shown to just be people, some just ones, some bigots, they all stand and fall on their own merits, that is sort of the entire point OF the book, surely?.

I would have thought the use of the word, and the racist attitudes shown, consistently CONDEMNED racism to the readers eyes, made it look like it is, mere blind stupid prejudice.


I don't understand. WHY did someone reading it think the words use was wrong, or children reading the words use wrong?. Were they somehow saying just the word written down was wrong for kids to read?. That just sort of does my head in, now are we to depict that something is wrong, if we can't SHOW its wrong-ness in detail?.

"Yes, we ought to write books in memorial of the Holocaust so it isn't repeated . . . it is just these words "murder" and "Killing" and "Gas chamber" and "Crematoria" that we have taken exception to . . . can you edit them out?".
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Wed Aug 04, 2010 2:22 am UTC

Jorpho wrote:
TheMaestro wrote:
Apteryx wrote: why did the wackos want it banned, do you know?.
I do know that a lot of boards banned it because it uses the word 'nigger'.
stupid people.
Indeed, the reasoning is obvious. Huckleberry Finn gets targeted for much the same reason.


And "Catcher In The Rye" is often targeted due to the foul language and some of the explicit parts.

When you try to censor or ban these books, it's like saying that such prejudices, such events never happened. There is a disclaimer on the Looney Tunes DVDs I have that indicate that some of the cartoons may contain material that might make some people cringe, due to racist stereotypes, suggestive language or actions, and other now-verboten things. To try to edit these out, is to say such prejudices never existed. While the material can make some people get their boxers in a bunch, they need to remember that this was considered "the norm" back then, and even back then there were people, of *all* races, who felt such prejudices were wrong.

We see that in "To Kill A Mockingbird". Atticus defended Tom Robinson because in his eye, ALL men were created equal, and deserved equal treatment, regardless of their skin color or intellect. Sure, it got the neighbors all riled up, and he endured some rather harsh criticism, as did his children, but he stood his ground. Once it was found out that Tom didn't do what he was accused of doing, then everyone saw things differently.
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Re: books you read for school and actually enjoyed

Postby Apteryx » Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:35 am UTC

And it is a book for children specifically. Be a rare man or woman grown, who could get much benefit from it, but it pretty clearly lays out an example of prejudice and its consequences , and in a way children can relate to.

Banning it sort of leaves contemporary racist thought a clean field, eh?.
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