Favourite poem(s)?

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zenja72
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Postby zenja72 » Sun Sep 09, 2007 11:26 pm UTC

Dejeuner du Matin, by Jacques Prevert (the first e is an accent). It's in french, so this is a translation I found online.

Morning Breakfast (english)

He put the coffee
Into the cup
He put the milk
Into the cup of coffee
He put the sugar
Into the cafe au lait
With the little spoon
He stirred
He drank the coffee
And he replaced the cup
Without speaking to me
He lit
A cigarette
He made rings
With the smoke
He put the ashes
Into the ashtray
Without speaking to me
Without looking to me
He stood up
He put
His hat upon his head
He put
His raincoat on
Because it was raining
And he left
Without one word
And me I placed
My head in my hand
And I cried.

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parkaboy
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Postby parkaboy » Mon Sep 10, 2007 12:26 am UTC

"Tears, Idle Tears" - Tennyson
"Fire and Ice" - Frost
Image

Back in our day we had to walk uphill both ways through the snow on fire without feet to get fucking terrible relationship advice from disinterested and socially maladjusted nerds. Belial

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Amicitia
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Postby Amicitia » Mon Sep 10, 2007 12:53 am UTC

I Will Alarm Islamic Owls

I will be alarming

the Islamic owls

that are in

the barn

and which

you warned me

are very jittery

and susceptible to loud noises

Forgive me

they see so well in the dark

so feathery

and so dedicated to Allah

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blackeye
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Postby blackeye » Tue Sep 11, 2007 5:30 am UTC

THE PARADOX:
the time is slowly passing
draining away the day
the hours are amassing
a repetition of ways
your face is slowly sinking
your toast has already sprung
and yet another morning
has already begun
now back to your life of rearranging files
and processing receipts
now ask your self the question
what is meaning?
I can't find the way out
of this empty hall
all I see are people
avoiding unheard calls
awaiting the turbulence
with shrugs and moans
the paper is delivered
no reply to Sunday mail

CITY OF GEARS:
the blues grow with contrast and size
and the site begins to overtake the eye
with gold trimmed clouds of white and grey
they fly over your face, tame and light
today you sail your kite over the horizon
tomorrow the storm washes over your body
and with glory you fade into ink
your eternal bed of runny letters
what will you bring before the judge and jury?
a line a verse, a simple page which claims your right to earth
what have you learned?
what will happen when you reach another city of gears?

these are two from my favorite author
cat?

strangeparallel9
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Postby strangeparallel9 » Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:04 am UTC

my most favoritest poem ever...The Four Quartets by TS Eliot and in particular the third of four parts entitled The Dry Salvages.

"for most of us there is only the unattended
moment the moment in and out of time
the distraction fit lost in a shaft of sunlight
the wild thyme unseen or the winter lightning
or the waterfall or the music heard so deeply
that it is not heard at all but you are the music
while the music lasts these are hints and guesses
hints followed by guesses and the rest
is prayer observance discipline thought and action
the hint half guessed the gift half understood is incarnation
here the impossible union
of spheres of existence is actual
here the past and future
are conquered and reconciled"

brilliance

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teamcorndog
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Postby teamcorndog » Fri Sep 14, 2007 12:51 pm UTC

Lewis Carroll's Jabberwoky (sp) is my favorite ever. I love how the nonsense words blend so perfectly with the real words. Even though half the words in it are made-up, you can understand it perfectly. Brilliant!

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Postby gmedina » Sat Sep 15, 2007 2:24 am UTC

I polis by Konstantinos Kavafis. I couldn't resist the temptation to post it here, so I searched for a "good" (I hope) English translation:

The City
(by Konstantinos Kavafis)

You said, "I will go to another land, I will go to another sea.
Another city will be found, better than this.
Every effort of mine is condemned by fate;
and my heart is -- like a corpse -- buried.
How long in this wasteland will my mind remain.
Wherever I turn my eyes, wherever I may look
I see the black ruins of my life here,
where I spent so many years, and ruined and wasted."

New lands you will not find, you will not find other seas.
The city will follow you. You will roam the same
streets. And you will age in the same neighborhoods;
in these same houses you will grow gray.
Always you will arrive in this city. To another land -- do not hope --
there is no ship for you, there is no road.
As you have ruined your life here
in this little corner, you have destroyed it in the whole world.
In Memoriam

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Postby platypus01 » Sat Sep 15, 2007 4:49 am UTC

Amicitia wrote:I Will Alarm Islamic Owls

I will be alarming

the Islamic owls

that are in

the barn

and which

you warned me

are very jittery

and susceptible to loud noises

Forgive me

they see so well in the dark

so feathery

and so dedicated to Allah

wow i guessed the author right, just from the "forgive me" line (this is just to say). weird?

and here is dejeuner du matin in the french, cause i know french a little, and i think it sounds way cooler in french lol. in case anyone else wanted to see it in french too.
Jacques Prevert wrote:Déjeuner du matin

Il a mis le café
Dans la tasse
Il a mis le lait
Dans la tasse de café
Il a mis le sucre
Dans le café au lait
Avec la petite cuiller
Il a tourné
Il a bu le café au lait
Et il a reposé la tasse
Sans me parler

Il a allumé
Une cigarette
Il a fait des ronds
Avec la fumée
Il a mis les cendres
Dans le cendrier
Sans me parler
Sans me regarder

Il s'est levé
Il a mis
Son chapeau sur sa tête
Il a mis son manteau de pluie
Parce qu'il pleuvait
Et il est parti
Sous la pluie
Sans une parole
Sans me regarder

Et moi j'ai pris
Ma tête dans ma main
Et j'ai pleuré
bleh

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Lyra Ngalia
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Postby Lyra Ngalia » Sat Sep 15, 2007 5:50 am UTC

Prologue from Romeo and Juliet (I don't even know why. I just like it a lot.)
"The Mower, Against Gardens" by Andrew Marvell
"Fire and Ice" by Robert Frost
"The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost
"Ode" by Author O'Shaughnessy
"The Bait" by John Donne
"Complaint to Four Angels" by Ogden Nash
"Sonnet 116" and "Sonnet 141" by Shakespeare

And then there's this, which just kind of makes me laugh a lot.

R. S. Gwynn wrote:Shakespearean Sonnet

A man is haunted by his father's ghost.
Boy meets girl while feuding families fight.
A Scottish king is murdered by his host.
Two couples get lost on a summer night.
A hunchback murders all who block his way.
A ruler's rivals plot against his life.
A fat man and a prince make rebels pay.
A noble Moor has doubts about his wife.
An English king decides to conquer France.
A duke learns that his best friend is a she.
A forest sets the scene for this romance.
An old man and his daughters disagree.
A Roman leader makes a big mistake.
A sexy queen is bitten by a snake.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path... Only I will remain.

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RockMuncher
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Postby RockMuncher » Mon Sep 17, 2007 8:26 am UTC

Bloodanna wrote:1. 'Funeral Blues'/'Stop All the Clocks, Cut Off the Telephone' by W. H. Auden:


I've been looking for that poem and the author for about two years now. Thanks! :D


My favorites:

The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock, by TS Eliot,
Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came, by R. Browning,
Sand and Foam, by Khalil Gibran,
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, by Coleridge,
The Walrus and the Carpenter, by Carroll,
anything from Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman,
and anything of Robert Services', especially The Cremation of Sam McGee and Grin:

If you're up against a bruiser and you're getting knocked about --

Grin.

If you're feeling pretty groggy, and you're licked beyond a doubt --

Grin.

Don't let him see you're funking, let him know with every clout,
Though your face is battered to a pulp, your blooming heart is stout;
Just stand upon your pins until the beggar knocks you out --

And grin.

This life's a bally battle, and the same advice holds true

Of grin.

If you're up against it badly, then it's only one on you,

So grin.

If the future's black as thunder, don't let people see you're blue;
Just cultivate a cast-iron smile of joy the whole day through;
If they call you "Little Sunshine", wish that THEY'D no troubles, too --

You may -- grin.

Rise up in the morning with the will that, smooth or rough,

You'll grin.

Sink to sleep at midnight, and although you're feeling tough,

Yet grin.

There's nothing gained by whining, and you're not that kind of stuff;
You're a fighter from away back, and you WON'T take a rebuff;
Your trouble is that you don't know when you have had enough --

Don't give in.

If Fate should down you, just get up and take another cuff;
You may bank on it that there is no philosophy like bluff,

And grin.





I guess you could say I like a lot of poetry.

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blackeye
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Postby blackeye » Thu Sep 20, 2007 6:38 am UTC

T.S Elliot is overrated...
the actual depth of his poems are alarmingly shallow compared to E.E Cummings and other 20th century poets. He seems so desperate, almost like he was Prufrock himself, it personally disgusts me.
cat?

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Africantearoa
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Africantearoa » Thu Oct 04, 2007 10:02 pm UTC

Elegy for a Diver - Peter Meinke

Jacknife swandive gainer twist
High off the board you’d pierce the sky
And split the apple of the devil sun
And spit in the sun’s fierce eye.
When you were young you never missed,
Archer-diver who flew too high
So everything later became undone.

Later everything burned to ash
Wings too close to the sun broke down
Jacknife swandive gainer twist
Can’t be done on the ground
And nothing in your diver’s past
Had warned you that a diver drowns
When nothing replaces what is missed.

Everything beautiful falls away
Jacknife swandive gainer twist
Muscles drop and skin turns coarse
Even skin the sun had kissed.
You drank the sun down every day
Until the sun no longer existed
And only the drink had any force.

Only the drink had any force
Archer-diver who flew too high
When you were young you never missed
And spit in the sun’s fierce eye.
Later everything burned to ash:
Everything beautiful falls away
Even skin the sun had kissed
Jacknife swandive gainer and twist

II
And now I see your bones in dreams
Turning and twisting below our feet
Finger bones bending out like wings
As once again your body sings
Swandiving slowly through the stone
That sparks your skill and shoulder bones
Layer by layer and over and over
You flash through limestone sand and lava
Feet together and backbone arched
Like an arrow aimed at the devil’s heart
The dead are watching your perfect dive
Clicking their fingers as if alive
High off the board and to hell with the chances
As once again your body dances
Anything done well shines forever only polished by death’s dark weather
Diver diver diving still
Now and forever I praise your skill


Angelene
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Angelene » Thu Oct 04, 2007 10:15 pm UTC

E.E. Cummings - you said Is

you said Is
there anything which
is dead or alive more beautiful
than my body,to have in your fingers
(trembling ever so little)?
Looking into
your eyes Nothing,i said,except the
air of spring smelling of never and forever.

....and through the lattice which moved as
if a hand is touched by a
hand(which
moved as though
fingers touch a girl's
breast,
lightly)
Do you believe in always,the wind
said to the rain
I am too busy with
my flowers to believe,the rain answered


Emily Dickinson - I died for beauty

I died for beauty, but was scarce
Adjusted in the tomb,
When one who died for truth was lain
In an adjoining room.

He questioned softly why I failed?
“For beauty,” I replied.
“And I for truth,—the two are one;
We brethren are,” he said.

And so, as kinsmen met a night,
We talked between the rooms,
Until the moss had reached our lips,
And covered up our names.
"Some people need a red carpet rolled out in front of them in order to walk forward into friendship. They can't see the tiny outstretched hands all around them, everywhere, like leaves on trees."

jwwells
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby jwwells » Sun Oct 07, 2007 7:47 pm UTC

blackeye: I wouldn't say his poems lack depth, but Eliot was more priggish than Prufrock. Prufrock was able to admit that he wasn't Hamlet; I like him more than his author.

I WILL ALARM ISLAMIC OWLS is brilliant. The anthology that contains it can be found here; it's been released under Creative Commons, and is filled with poems based on anagrams of the names of poets. Sadly, most of it is not up to ISLAMIC OWL standards.

My favorites - I tend, like a lot of posters here, to prefer lyrical stuff.

WH Auden:

Lay your sleeping head, my love
The Fall of Rome

Also, as self-indulgent as the whole "ART AND NATURE" schtick gets after a while, The Sea and the Mirror contains some incredibly good poetry. Below is the piece that, when quoted, got me into W. H. Auden:

Code: Select all

Postscript
[i](Ariel to Caliban, Echo by the Prompter)

Weep no more but pity me,
Fleet persistent shadow cast
By your lameness, caught at last,
Helplessly in love with you,
Elegance, art, fascination,
    Fascinated by
    Drab mortality;
Spare me a humiliation,
    To your faults be true:
I can sing as you reply
                                ...I

Wish for nothing lest you mar
The perfection in these eyes
Whose entire devotion lies
At the mercy of your will;
Tempt not your sworn comrade, - only
    As I am can I love you as you are -
For my company be lonely
    For my health be ill:
I will sing if you will cry
                                 ...I

Never hope to say farewell,
For our lethargy is such
Heaven's kindness cannot touch
Nor earth's frankly brutal drum;
This was long ago decided,
     Both of us know why,
     Can, alas, foretell,
When our falsehoods are divided,
     What we shall become,
One evaporating sigh
                              ...I


I would have bet anything that a twentieth century poem beginning "Weep no more" and continuing into the phrase "Helplessly in love with you" would be terrible, but Auden knows how to make these things sing. His poetry's tightly crafted - compare an early draft of the first verse here, before he's worked out exactly what he wants to say:

Code: Select all

Seek no more, rejoice in me,
The unwanted shadow cast
By your lameness, found at last
Helplessly in love with you
     Order, energy, and beauty
     Fascinated by
Drab stupidity; [...]


-
Emily Dickinson:

There's a certain slant of light
Because I could not stop for Death

pictorignotus
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby pictorignotus » Mon Nov 19, 2007 4:32 am UTC

robert browning - andrea del sarto; the last ride together; two in the campagna; love in the ruins; my last duchess
gerard manley hopkins - the windhover; god's grandeur; i wake and feel the fell of dark, not day
george herbert - the windows; aaron; the collar; the pulley
john donne - a valediction: forbidding mourning, a valediction of weeping, the sun rising, song (sweetest love), elegy 10, holy sonnet 10 &14
emily dickinson - after a great pain, a formal feeling comes
philip larkin - when first we faced
john ashbery - soonest mended
sylvia plath - edge
t.s. eliot - the wasteland

...and most things by the romantic six minus wordsworth (blake, byron, shelley, keats, coleridge)

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby cathrl » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:22 pm UTC

"Dulce et decorum est" - Wilfred Owen. I'm not much into poetry, but that one really gets me.

And have I mentioned yet in this forum how much I hate Prevert's poetry? Having to write lit crit on his work for my French A level put me off poetry very efficiently for the past 19 years. I'm only just now starting to be able to enjoy reading it again.

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1337geek
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby 1337geek » Mon Nov 19, 2007 8:13 pm UTC

My all-time favorite poem is "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe.

I'm also very partial to silly ones like:
"Roses are red
Violets are blue
Most poems rhyme
But this one doesn't."

I also like several of the poems that I have written.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Asleep or Wrong » Tue Nov 20, 2007 6:10 am UTC

Carmen V by Catullus
Catvllvs wrote:Vivamvs mea Lesbia, atqve amemvs,
rvmoresqve senvm severiorvm
omnes vnivs aestimemvs assis!
soles occidere et redire possvnt:
nobis cvm semel occidit brevis lvx,
nox est perpetva vna dormienda.
da mi basia mille, deinde centvm,
dein mille altera, dein secvnda centvm,
deinde vsqve altera mille, deinde centvm.
dein, cvm milia mvlta fecerimvs,
contvrbabimvs illa, ne sciamvs,
avt ne qvis malvs invidere possit,
cvm tantvm sciat esse basiorvm.


Also much love to the person who posted Invictus.

Since this is becoming general poetry-y, I want to put to word that one day I will get a copy of Ezra Pound's Cantos and sit down and read and not stop until completion or death.

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liza
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby liza » Tue Nov 20, 2007 7:35 am UTC

Oh, wow, haven't thought of that poem in a good while.

Helpful hint: when the task of memorizing a poem is presented to you while in tenth grade and you're easily distracted by classmates' sniggers, don't choose a poem that has the word 'Lesbia' in the first line.
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"Attempting to save the free world and preserve Democracy...without Liza"
But...But [that would] just be announcing you're definitely about to fail.

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Unakau » Thu Nov 22, 2007 7:05 pm UTC

I love pretty much anything by ee cummings.

I also adore William Blake.

Plato Told by cummings is probably my favorite poem, followed by London by William Blake.

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Ans: 42 » Sun Dec 09, 2007 1:55 pm UTC

The Eve of St. Agnes, John Keats. . .I fall in love with falling in love everytime I read it.

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Amarantha
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Amarantha » Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:33 am UTC

Many of my favourites have been mentioned already. I shall add:

In My Craft Or Sullen Art by Dylan Thomas
To a Poet a Thousand Years Hence by James Elroy Flecker
Remembrance by Emily Brontë
The Goat Paths by James Stephens
The Stone Troll by J.R.R. Tolkien
Cargoes by John Masefield

I'm sure I've forgotten some.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby schmiggen » Mon Dec 10, 2007 5:27 am UTC

Invictus = win. Always has, for me. Same with "Do not go Gentle into That Good Night" by Dylan Thomas.
Spoiler:
Dylan Thomas wrote:Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near dath, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tiers, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Also, The Sun Rising is one of my favorite love-poems:
Spoiler:
John Donne wrote:Busy old fool, unruly Sun,
Why dost thou thus,
Through windows and through curtains call on us?
Must to thy motions lovers' seasons run?
Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide
Late school-boys, and sour 'prentices,
Go tell court-huntsmen that the King will ride,
Call country ants to harvest offices;
Love, all alike, no season knows, nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

Thy beams, so reverend and strong
Why shouldst thou think?
I could eclips and cloud them with a wink,
But that I would not lose her sight so long:
If her eyes have not blinded thine,
Look, and tomorrow late tell me,
Whether both the Indias of spice and mine
Be where thou left'st them, or lie here with me.
Ask for those kings whom thou saw'st yesterday,
And thou shalt hear, 'All here in one bed lay.'

She's all States, and all Princes I;
Nothing else is.
Princes do but play us; compared to this,
All honour's mimic; all wealth alchemy.
Thou, Sun, art half as happy as we,
in that the world's contracted thus;
Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be
to warm the world, that's done in warming us.
Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere;
This bed thy centre is, these walls thy sphere.

It's wonderful when someone so nearly touches how you feel about the person you feel most strongly about.

EDIT: Check out my new spoilers!
Last edited by schmiggen on Tue Mar 18, 2008 8:53 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Phentos » Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:07 pm UTC

First off, I'd like to complain that people would load in a huge poem without spoilering it for space.

Second, I'd like to introduce you all to http://www.fishousepoems.org/, an audio archive of poetry.

Third, I would like to present Here, Bullet, by Brian Turner, in addition to a link of him reading it (courtesy fishhouse)

Spoiler:
Here, Bullet

If a body is what you want,
then here is bone and gristle and flesh.
Here is the clavicle-snapped wish,
the aorta’s opened valves, the leap
thought makes at the synaptic gap.
Here is the adrenaline rush you crave,
that inexorable flight, that insane puncture
into heat and blood. And I dare you to finish
what you’ve started. Because here, Bullet,
here is where I complete the word you bring
hissing through the air, here is where I moan
the barrel’s cold esophagus, triggering
my tongue’s explosives for the rifling I have
inside of me, each twist of the round
spun deeper, because here, Bullet,
here is where the world ends, every time.



Link : http://www.fishousepoems.org/archives/brian_turner/here_bullet.shtml
Image

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Gunfingers
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Gunfingers » Tue Dec 11, 2007 10:15 pm UTC

I would like to second Stephen Crane's "In the Desert" and also mention poe's "The bells" which is just so lyrical. I love it.

thejdawg
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby thejdawg » Tue Dec 11, 2007 11:12 pm UTC

Oh yes
there are worse things than
being alone
but it often takes decades
to realize this
and most often
when you do
it's too late
and there's nothing worse
than
too late.

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby aion7 » Sun Dec 16, 2007 2:40 am UTC

I can't believe Edward Lear hasn't been mentioned. He is definitely one of my favorites. As are Poe, and Homer of course.

Spoiler:
The Jumblies - Edward Lear

They went to sea in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they went to sea:
In spite of all their friends could say,
On a winter's morn, on a stormy day,
In a Sieve they went to sea!
And when the Sieve turned round and round,
And every one cried, 'You'll all be drowned!'
They called aloud, 'Our Sieve ain't big,
But we don't care a button! we don't care a fig!
In a Sieve we'll go to sea!'
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.


II

They sailed away in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they sailed so fast,
With only a beautiful pea-green veil
Tied with a riband by way of a sail,
To a small tobacco-pipe mast;
And every one said, who saw them go,
'O won't they be soon upset, you know!
For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long,
And happen what may, it's extremely wrong
In a Sieve to sail so fast!'
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.


III

The water it soon came in, it did,
The water it soon came in;
So to keep them dry, they wrapped their feet
In a pinky paper all folded neat,
And they fastened it down with a pin.
And they passed the night in a crockery-jar,
And each of them said, 'How wise we are!
Though the sky be dark, and the voyage be long,
Yet we never can think we were rash or wrong,
While round in our Sieve we spin!'
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.


IV

And all night long they sailed away;
And when the sun went down,
They whistled and warbled a moony song
To the echoing sound of a coppery gong,
In the shade of the mountains brown.
'O Timballo! How happy we are,
When we live in a Sieve and a crockery-jar,
And all night long in the moonlight pale,
We sail away with a pea-green sail,
In the shade of the mountains brown!'
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.


V

They sailed to the Western Sea, they did,
To a land all covered with trees,
And they bought an Owl, and a useful Cart,
And a pound of Rice, and a Cranberry Tart,
And a hive of silvery Bees.
And they bought a Pig, and some green Jack-daws,
And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws,
And forty bottles of Ring-Bo-Ree,
And no end of Stilton Cheese.
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.


VI

And in twenty years they all came back,
In twenty years or more,
And every one said, 'How tall they've grown!
For they've been to the Lakes, and the Torrible Zone,
And the hills of the Chankly Bore!'
And they drank their health, and gave them a feast
Of dumplings made of beautiful yeast;
And every one said, 'If we only live,
We too will go to sea in a Sieve,---
To the hills of the Chankly Bore!'
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.
Spoiler:
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The Great Hippo
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby The Great Hippo » Sun Dec 16, 2007 4:11 am UTC

ThanatosDrive wrote:Stephen Crane - In The Desert


I believe (perhaps incorrectly--maybe I just hang out with the wrong sort of people) that Stephen Crane is criminally underrated. Not just In The Desert, but all his poems--War is Kind stands out as another great one. Seriously--Stephen Crane's poems tend to be very short but manage to somehow transfer so much information into this tiny flash of brilliance. He's fantastic. You can find all of his stuff online.

Here's another one of my favorites by him:

Stephen Crane, A Man Said to the Universe wrote:A man said to the universe:
"Sir I exist!"
"However," replied the universe,
"The fact has not created in me
A sense of obligation."

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby parkaboy » Sun Dec 16, 2007 8:08 am UTC

^_^ thats been my sig on a few forums, a few times. i love that one.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby segmentation fault » Thu Dec 20, 2007 9:02 pm UTC

The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot. i wasnt a fan of any of his other works. but just the first couple of lines of that poem get me:

April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.
...


it gives me goosebumps.
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AtomicLlama
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby AtomicLlama » Thu Dec 20, 2007 10:47 pm UTC

William Carlos Williams - Red Wheelbarrow and This Is Just To Say
Pablo Neruda - The Book Of Questions

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Knucklecallus093
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Knucklecallus093 » Tue Feb 26, 2008 3:49 am UTC

Whitman, especially his long poems that can sound like the definition of comfort when the right voice reads them.

But this one by Emily Dickenson:
The Soul selects her own Society
The Soul selects her own Society –
Then – shuts the Door –
To her divine Majority –
Present no more –

Unmoved – she notes the Chariots – pausing –
At her low Gate –
Unmoved – an Emperor be kneeling
Upon her Mat –

I’ve known her – from an ample nation –
Choose One –
Then – close the Valves of her attention –
Like Stone –

Want to attempt the interpretation? Here is a hint: Pay close attention to the narrator, and what he may be subconsciously implying.
Be curious, not judgmental. - Walt Whitman
"Tyrannosaurs in F-14s!" - Calvin

Every man's life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that
distinguish one man from another. -Hemingway

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Tue Feb 26, 2008 4:30 am UTC

I've always like Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.


And this one, let's see if I can still do it by memory...

Spoiler:
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler; long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent into the undergrowth

Then took the other, being just as fair
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black
Oh! I left the first for another day
Though knowing how way leads onto way
I doubted if I should ever come back

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence
Two roads diverged in a wood and I--
I took the one less traveled by
And that has made all the difference.


Amazing. Especially since the common interpretation ("strike out on your own path") isn't necessarily true.

And Rudyard Kipling:

Spoiler:
If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same:.
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build'em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings,
And never breathe a word about your loss:
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!"

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings---nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much:
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And---which is more---you'll be a Man, my son!
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Knucklecallus093 » Tue Feb 26, 2008 5:28 am UTC

Sir_Elderberry wrote:I've always like Robert Frost

Spoiler:
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler; long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent into the undergrowth

Then took the other, being just as fair
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black
Oh! I left the first for another day
Though knowing how way leads onto way
I doubted if I should ever come back

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence
Two roads diverged in a wood and I--
I took the one less traveled by
And that has made all the difference.


Amazing. Especially since the common interpretation ("strike out on your own path") isn't necessarily true.

While that poem influences me greatly, I believe that robert frost, and especially The Road Not Taken, have been introduced into major society, which sort of ruins it for me. I feel like it is cliché to emphasize your love of robert frost, because he is so recognized and loved, even though most people enjoy his work just because he is well known. But this isnt a personal assault on your preferences. I don't like clichés, because what ever has been turned into a cliché usually has had its meaning twisted by the public.
Be curious, not judgmental. - Walt Whitman
"Tyrannosaurs in F-14s!" - Calvin

Every man's life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that
distinguish one man from another. -Hemingway

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Re:

Postby BizzleBot » Tue Feb 26, 2008 5:57 am UTC

Maseiken wrote:That's a toughie...
My favorite Soliloquy is Macbeth's Dagger speech,
I really want to perform that some day...



good answer. that play is so righteous, the last time i did it i was one of the witches :)
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Teh Russians » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:06 am UTC

William Carlos Williams wrote:I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox

and which
you were probably
saving
for breakfast

Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet
and so cold
Confucius wrote:Sit by the river long enough, and the bodies of your enemies will float by.

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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby pieaholicx » Tue Feb 26, 2008 2:04 pm UTC

While I don't read much poetry, I am an Emily Dickinson fan.

I'm nobody! Who are you? wrote:I'm nobody! Who are you?
Are you nobody, too?
Then there's a pair of us--don't tell!
They'd banish us, you know.

How dreary to be somebody!
How public, like a frog
To tell your name the livelong day
To an admiring bog!


Also did enjoy Beowulf.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby wery67564 » Tue Feb 26, 2008 7:52 pm UTC

o_O....O_o

This is gonna get me hated forevers, but all of Bukowski, the man is a frickin' literary genius.
Also ee cummings, deliciousness all around his sparsely punctuated verbage.


Side note: I read Bukowski before the Modest Mouse song, and I'm not emo. Continue.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Wed Feb 27, 2008 1:16 am UTC

Knucklecallus093 wrote:
Sir_Elderberry wrote:I've always like Robert Frost

Spoiler:
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler; long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent into the undergrowth

Then took the other, being just as fair
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black
Oh! I left the first for another day
Though knowing how way leads onto way
I doubted if I should ever come back

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence
Two roads diverged in a wood and I--
I took the one less traveled by
And that has made all the difference.


Amazing. Especially since the common interpretation ("strike out on your own path") isn't necessarily true.

While that poem influences me greatly, I believe that robert frost, and especially The Road Not Taken, have been introduced into major society, which sort of ruins it for me. I feel like it is cliché to emphasize your love of robert frost, because he is so recognized and loved, even though most people enjoy his work just because he is well known. But this isnt a personal assault on your preferences. I don't like clichés, because what ever has been turned into a cliché usually has had its meaning twisted by the public.


Yeah, well, there's a certain desire to be unique and such, of course, but if someone's good, they're good in spite of the general public's opinion one way or the other.

Admittedly, I haven't consciously sought out much poetry, which probably accounts for liking things that are already popular.
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Re: Favourite poem(s)?

Postby steewi » Wed Feb 27, 2008 1:20 am UTC

All my favourites have already been mentioned (it seems I have obvious taste).

The Second Coming
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
Stop All the Clocks
The Hollow Men
The Raven
Dulce Et Decorum Est
Do not go gentle into that good night

I also have a fondness for an Australian poet Bruce Dawe, after seeing a dramatic performance of his poetry during high school, and for some troubador poetry, such as Mendinho's Sedia-m’ eu na ermida de San Simión.

I like poetry that rolls off the tongue easily as much as (or more than) deep meaning.


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