Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby tiny » Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:36 pm UTC

You will possibly rip off my head for this, but... I read the first two pages or so of 'Dune' and they were so unbelievably bad that I put the book away again. The gender roles are flipped around. Oh, what an extraordinary idea. The desert ist good, woods are bad, oh, another extraordinary idea. Just switch stuff and it becomes cool? No... no, this concept is too simple to impress me.

Lord of the Flies. Had to read it for school. Thank all gods for secondary literature.
Mary Stuart... secondary literature.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Vanguard » Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:44 pm UTC

I got bored of Harry Potter at the 5th book. The first 4 really enthralled me but the rest were boring... I have yet to read the last two books. And order of the phoenix was, blegh.

I think it was the whole "magic school" thing I liked. When everyone got out of school that's when the series died in me.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby jdharper » Tue Dec 11, 2007 5:36 am UTC

tiny wrote:You will possibly rip off my head for this, but... I read the first two pages or so of 'Dune' and they were so unbelievably bad that I put the book away again. The gender roles are flipped around. Oh, what an extraordinary idea. The desert ist good, woods are bad, oh, another extraordinary idea. Just switch stuff and it becomes cool? No... no, this concept is too simple to impress me.


Oh, man, did you ever miss out. The story has absolutely nothing to do with gender-role reversal--the main character is Paul Atreides, the son of a Duke, who ends up playing a pivotal role in the course of history. I'm not sure how a male leader, the son of a male leader, is gender role reversal.

And "the desert is good, the woods are bad"? Half the story, the characters are trying to just survive in the desert; it's by no means a paradise. Arrakis, the planet on which Dune is set, is a direct analog to the Middle East. There's a tremendously valuable resource on the planet, which is why people are willing to risk their lives to work there.

You really ought to go and buy the Audible version of this book, and give it more than two minutes this time. It's one of my all-time favorite sci-fi stories.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby thejdawg » Tue Dec 11, 2007 4:41 pm UTC

Any and all of the Wheel of Time books past book 3 or so. Not that I don't like heaving bosoms, but when every female character possesses one, along with looks like daggers, it gets repetitive. Oh, and Rand broods. A lot. I get it. It doesn't help that the books get progressively longer while less and less happens as the series continues.

Confederacy of Dunces. I admit, I never finished it. I also admit that I never had the desire to punch someone in the face as the people who told me this book was 'amazing,' 'fantastic,' or anything but 'awful.'

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Kythyria » Sun Dec 16, 2007 12:50 pm UTC

Harry Potter #7. The near-death experience Harry has near the end is lame. As is the epilogue.

The Riverworld series. After the first book, it went downhill. The whole premise was just wrong.

The Dangerous Visions anthologies (I found them in a pile of my father's old books). Half the stories were forgettable, and the other half were bizarre. As I recall, the worst was "Riders of the purple wage" by Philip Jose Farmer - the author of the Riverworld series, and indeed the bizarreness had the same style. Rather like Alice in Wonderland, it made me think "WTF was this guy high on?". Actually Purple Wage is worse than Riverworld in that respect, as in, he came up with the Riverworld while high but wrote it while in a normal state of mind, while he wrote the entire of Purple Wage while on something illegal.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Boatz! » Mon Dec 17, 2007 10:32 pm UTC

As above, Harry Potter 7 was quite disappointing in the fact it was really a bit of a cop-out ending.

The rest of the stories are solid though, don't me wrong, and I've been reading and re-reading these books for 9 years, when it ended, I felt very hollow...
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby bbctol » Tue Dec 18, 2007 1:59 am UTC

tiny wrote:You will possibly rip off my head for this, but... I read the first two pages or so of 'Dune' and they were so unbelievably bad that I put the book away again. The gender roles are flipped around. Oh, what an extraordinary idea. The desert ist good, woods are bad, oh, another extraordinary idea. Just switch stuff and it becomes cool? No... no, this concept is too simple to impress me.

Yes, the premise you understand after two pages is pretty simple, I must admit.

A pity you didn't actually read the book and find out that you're entirely wrong. Gender roles are not at all switched around. Males still control everything. The Bene Gesserit are a secret society, not directly connected with government or much of anything. Plus, the desert sucks. Really sucks. And woods are just about never mentioned.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby jynjin » Tue Dec 18, 2007 2:12 am UTC

thejdawg wrote:Confederacy of Dunces. I admit, I never finished it. I also admit that I never had the desire to punch someone in the face as the people who told me this book was 'amazing,' 'fantastic,' or anything but 'awful.'

Where exactly do you live? I'm willing to take a punch in the face for having this book as one of my top 30. Ignatius was quite amusing to me. His perspective was so ludicrous and egotistical - I couldn't help rooting for him.

Hmm. A book I was disappointed in after finishing: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Nothing that left a lasting impression. It was cold. He was feeling ill. Tadaa. Nothing more than a dull short story.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby JayDee » Tue Dec 18, 2007 2:28 am UTC

I meant to mention this one earlier: Watchmen. Great book (comic/graphic novel/whatever) - shit ending.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby The Great Hippo » Tue Dec 18, 2007 2:41 am UTC

JayDee wrote:I meant to mention this one earlier: Watchmen. Great book (comic/graphic novel/whatever) - shit ending.


POPPYCOCK.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby thejdawg » Tue Dec 18, 2007 4:32 am UTC

jynjin wrote:
thejdawg wrote:Confederacy of Dunces. I admit, I never finished it. I also admit that I never had the desire to punch someone in the face as the people who told me this book was 'amazing,' 'fantastic,' or anything but 'awful.'

Where exactly do you live? I'm willing to take a punch in the face for having this book as one of my top 30. Ignatius was quite amusing to me. His perspective was so ludicrous and egotistical - I couldn't help rooting for him.

Chicago.

I guess I don't get the book. I simply couldn't find a point to reading on. None of the characters were charismatic, and the plot wasn't engaging enough to make me want to care.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby JayDee » Wed Dec 19, 2007 9:40 am UTC

The Great Hippo wrote:
JayDee wrote:I meant to mention this one earlier: Watchmen. Great book (comic/graphic novel/whatever) - shit ending.


POPPYCOCK.

You may now visualize my monocle popping out of my eye-socket with indignation!

I bought the comic because it was so worshipped. Love it up to the last couple pages. Can't stand the ending.

I used to feel guilty about this, until recently.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby The Great Hippo » Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:01 pm UTC

JayDee wrote:I bought the comic because it was so worshipped. Love it up to the last couple pages. Can't stand the ending.

I used to feel guilty about this, until recently.


Well, certainly never feel guilty about disliking something! Still, I can't even recall (and my copy is currently on loan)--what were the last few pages?

Spoiler:
I remember the talk between Ozymandias and Dr. Manhattan, and I think I remember the right-wing nutjob newsrag publisher saying "I leave it to you" as one of his writers reached towards a pile where Rorschach's journal sat. I thought it was a great way to end it; literally, the author leaves what happens to you.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Aesar » Wed Dec 19, 2007 4:53 pm UTC

Andromeda Nebula by Ivan Yefremov.

I read a little synopsis and it really intrigued me (its sci-fi in a communist future) but I thought it was really disappointing, I had a hard time forcing myself to finish it. Just to much romantisizing to me.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby JayDee » Fri Dec 21, 2007 1:03 am UTC

The Great Hippo wrote:Well, certainly never feel guilty about disliking something! Still, I can't even recall (and my copy is currently on loan)--what were the last few pages?

Well, I felt like I was missing something rather than guilty, perhaps.
As to the ending:
Spoiler:
It was Heroes Season 1 that convinced me. If the, um, bomb, had have gone off I would have hated it. It would have been a bad ending. That's the impression I got from Watchmen - that the bad guys* won. That's an ending that's very hard to pull of, and I don't think they did in Watchmen.

*I'm sure there are plenty would disagree on Ozymandius being a bad guy, but I'd say it's pretty clear if you judge on narrative structure alone.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby katwingz18 » Fri Dec 21, 2007 4:04 am UTC

Out of the seven books of the Harry Potter series, I think I was actually the most disappointed by Book 6, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. In fact, I was so disappointed that it made me angry. It wasn't so much the specific events that pissed me off (although there was plenty of that too) so much as it was just that the book itself seemed out of place compared to the other books - the writing style, the portrayal of the characters, heck, even the title sounded a bit "off." Throughout the whole thing, I kept thinking to myself, 'This reads like some of the lesser-quality fanfiction I've come across on the net!' It was like I was reading a book written by someone else who was just trying to pass themselves off as J. K. Rowling, and despite that massive FAIL, still managed to pull the wool over everyone's eyes.

So, in light of that let-down, Book 7 wasn't so bad for me. Granted, the epilogue did kind of grate on my nerves, and the vicious bit of character-culling she did in one of the earlier chapters still makes me see red, but all in all, by the time I finished the book, I was relieved.

It could have turned out so much worse than it did.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Aesar » Fri Dec 21, 2007 2:51 pm UTC

HP didn't end cool. He just should've died. And that last chapter was really pathetic and useless.

After 7 I reread #1, and the style and tone were soooo different. I think it really changed after #3 and that's a shame, though maybe it had to be like that, for the storyline...
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby bbctol » Sat Dec 22, 2007 4:44 am UTC

I think it's essentially universally agreed that Harry should have died. The final time where he doesn't get a weird escape clause that lets him live. Not yet another, "But due to love, you're still alive! Again!" Harry dies, Voldemort dies, and the reader finishes shocked and happy.

The epilogue read like really bad fanfiction. And the ending lines were the worst ending lines imaginable.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby JayDee » Sat Dec 22, 2007 5:21 am UTC

I didn't mind how Deathly Hallows ended. You can assume* that I tore out the fan service epilogue before reading. I thought the Kings Cross Station chapter was dodgy, but so was the whole book. I never really expected Harry to die.

*Assume, becuase I would never do that to a book.
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Re:

Postby theamberkey » Sun Dec 23, 2007 7:20 pm UTC

Nyarlathotep wrote:Riverworld.

. . .

In short, I should have just left it at To Your Scattered Bodies.


Well, I've only read the first two. I guess I'll keep it that way.


I've got to agree with Koontz, though I quite liked The Bad Place--it was just weird enough. But after reading three or so books, I realized that hey, guess what, every single plot is the same. "Gee, Mr. Koontz, I wonder who the sadistic, villainous sociopath is gonna be in this one! I'm on the tips of my toes, here!"


Ah, but the clincher has to be the Assassin's Trilogy by Robin Hobb. I read 2.5/3.0 books before looking back on the series and realizing that I just didn't care. At all. It was an entire trilogy of potential that was never, ever tapped. I love her as an author, thought The Liveship Traders was brilliant in all sorts of ways, but there was nothing of that to Assassin's.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby The Great Hippo » Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:52 am UTC

Let me jump on top of the Koontz hate-train for a minute.

My first Koontz book was Watchers, when I was in middle-school. Totally loved it. I think I read Midnight after that, and it really flabbergasted me with all the tragedy and death and mayhem.

But soon I started to realize that all his characters were exactly the same. Not only that, but all his sociopaths were irredeemably evil carictures. The man seems incapable of producing a complicated character; I read most of the Odd Thomas series, and--surprise!--the villains are all irredeemable super-narcissistic douchebags. Come on.

The last book of his I seriously sat down and read was some sort of crappy story about this evil voodoo practitioner. For one moment, he accidentally adds complexity to the villain; the character notes he is motivated by his brother's unjust death at the hands of a criminal cartel and will not rest until he delivers vigilante justice on their heads. One page later? He reveals this is all actually bull shit and he just wants to kill the criminals (and their innocent children) because he's a fucking douchebag. No, seriously. That's his motivation. "HAR HAR JUST KIDDING, I ACTUALLY JUST LIKE KILLING PEOPLE BECAUSE I AM A DOUCHEBAG". What the fuck?!

I stopped reading when it was also revealed that the voodoo practitioner got off on watching children being torn apart (as in he FAPPED while watching it), and was also probably a pedophile. Jesus Christ.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby The Great Hippo » Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:56 am UTC

Let me also add that I used to absolutely adore the Xanth series as a child and thought Piers Anthony was the best author ever.

I finished the space pirate series of his (can't remember the name--main character was Hugo, I think? About his rise to power? Sci-fi), and while it was great fap material as an adolescent (please pardon my brusqueness here ): ), I just could not stomach having that much propaganda shoved down my throat. Even when I was a teenager, I could smell something stinky in Denmark.

I guess this is just my thing, though; I really, really don't like authors who write to express a point--at least not when they do it by creating an artificial world that reaffirms that point at every other goddamn page. It feels so masturbatory. "Look, this is how the world works! This is how things should be! And I will prove it to you--by making up a totally fictional story that proves me right!" A lot of authors do this.

This might be something particular to me. If so, my apologies for smearing my particular brand of crazy over the thread. D:

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby theamberkey » Mon Dec 24, 2007 6:17 am UTC

tiny wrote:You will possibly rip off my head for this, but... I read the first two pages or so of 'Dune' and they were so unbelievably bad that I put the book away again. The gender roles are flipped around. Oh, what an extraordinary idea. The desert ist good, woods are bad, oh, another extraordinary idea. Just switch stuff and it becomes cool? No... no, this concept is too simple to impress me.


Wut?

I don't care if you don't like Dune, but Wut? :?
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Masuri » Mon Dec 24, 2007 4:07 pm UTC

Dan Simmons' Illium/Olympos books. They looked great at the outset and it turned out to be a confusing mass of crap. Plus, the only part of the two-book series I truly loved was stolen verbatim from Robert Browning's Caliban Upon Setebos. I knew it sounded familiar, but thought it only borrowed until I reread the poem. Yes, it's great writing - too bad it wasn't Simmons'.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Masuri » Mon Dec 24, 2007 4:13 pm UTC

tiny wrote:You will possibly rip off my head for this, but... I read the first two pages or so of 'Dune' and they were so unbelievably bad that I put the book away again. The gender roles are flipped around. Oh, what an extraordinary idea. The desert ist good, woods are bad, oh, another extraordinary idea. Just switch stuff and it becomes cool? No... no, this concept is too simple to impress me.


This kind of reminds me of the people who make comments about how The Lord of the Rings rips off stuff from The Wheel of Time or various other fantasy series that came years after it. ;)

Dune is heavy going for the first 3 or 4 chapters, but after that it's impossible to put it down. It's a damn fine book and 2 pages isn't enough to really decide anything. Try it again, it's worth reading. (I'll admit I never got through the others in the series, though.)

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby MotorToad » Mon Dec 24, 2007 4:32 pm UTC

This isn't pure to the topic, but I'm afraid it's going to be and I would like to stop it if possible.

I recently raided a used book store and picked up the Bourne Identity trilogy. Has anyone read these books? I'm curious if it gets any better.

So far, this is one of those rare cases where the movie is better than the book. (I say "rare," but I really can't remember this happening before.) They really chopped the story up to make the movie. They'd have had to make some changes even if they'd tried to follow the book since the book is before cell phones and intartubez, but there is really no effort to keep to the book. No character has the same motives, none has the same background, nothing. The only similarities are the amnesiac assassin and there's a girl. What's weird, though, is that the movie is credible (in that movie-about-superhuman-millionaire-assassins kind of way) that the book really isn't carrying.

Anyway, my question is, has anyone read this? Is it a book worth reading? Is it just me being to critical because the story isn't what I expected? Could I keep up with T. E. Lawrence if we rode motorcycles together?
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Masuri » Mon Dec 24, 2007 5:20 pm UTC

I read all three Bourne books, and, no, it doesn't get any better. In fact, it pretty much gets progressively worse.

After reading those books, I am astonished that Robert Ludlum is as popular as he is. I guess it's just the style of writing in that genre and at that time that turns me off. The story-telling just struck me as disjointed, confused, and, well, lame.

The movies are based very loosely on the idea of this trilogy. I think they did it a hell of a lot better than the original, too.

On a random tangent, somewhere out there, there's a movie solely dedicated to Carlos the Jackal. I think it starred Bruce Willis and was awful, if memory serves.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby xndrew » Mon Dec 24, 2007 9:23 pm UTC

Masuri wrote:On a random tangent, somewhere out there, there's a movie solely dedicated to Carlos the Jackal. I think it starred Bruce Willis and was awful, if memory serves.

The name of the movie is, in fact, The Jackal.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby JayDee » Mon Dec 24, 2007 10:09 pm UTC

MotorToad wrote:Anyway, my question is, has anyone read this? Is it a book worth reading? Is it just me being to critical because the story isn't what I expected? Could I keep up with T. E. Lawrence if we rode motorcycles together?
I'm fairly certain I'm not the only person on these boards thinking "Sacrilege!" They are certainly different. The book is longer, more complex and dense. That doesn't neccisarily mean better or worse. I've found that pretty much all of Ludlums books are much the same, but since I like them, that doesn't bother me. Of those I've read I'd say the Bourne Identity is the best.

And yeah, a lot of it would be a matter of taste. If you don't like the Ludlum book you've read because of the style or whatnot, I wouldn't expect you to like any of the others.
Masuri wrote:On a random tangent, somewhere out there, there's a movie solely dedicated to Carlos the Jackal. I think it starred Bruce Willis and was awful, if memory serves.
It didn't occur to me that it was the same Jackal. Although I was under the impression that the Willis version was a remake of an earlier (and better, so I've heard) movie, also called the Jackal. But I could be wrong.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby marep » Mon Dec 24, 2007 10:55 pm UTC

harry potter and the fucking deathly hallows

shit

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby alice.nell » Mon Dec 24, 2007 11:18 pm UTC

the "twilight" series by Stephenie Meyer
though i can't really say i was terribly disappointed because my hopes weren't too high to begin with considering it fell under "teen drama". Though after constant hounding i read the first and was not enthralled. It irks me to see how horribly obsessed people get over that series. It's sad, and now they are making a movie... which is even more sad.
the books SUCK.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Narsil » Thu Dec 27, 2007 4:32 am UTC

The Great Hippo wrote:though; I really, really don't like authors who write to express a point--at least not when they do it by creating an artificial world that reaffirms that point at every other goddamn page. It feels so masturbatory. "Look, this is how the world works! This is how things should be! And I will prove it to you--by making up a totally fictional story that proves me right!" A lot of authors do this.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby darwinwins » Thu Dec 27, 2007 5:04 am UTC

i happened to like the harry potter and the deathly hallows as a whole. LOVED IT, you buncha jerks.

as it stands, the book that i had the highest expectations for and ended up hating absolutely was The Alchemist by that kahlo fella. suckkkkkkked.
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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby theonemephisto » Fri Dec 28, 2007 2:23 am UTC

MotorToad wrote:So far, this is one of those rare cases where the movie is better than the book. (I say "rare," but I really can't remember this happening before.) They really chopped the story up to make the movie. They'd have had to make some changes even if they'd tried to follow the book since the book is before cell phones and intartubez, but there is really no effort to keep to the book. No character has the same motives, none has the same background, nothing. The only similarities are the amnesiac assassin and there's a girl. What's weird, though, is that the movie is credible (in that movie-about-superhuman-millionaire-assassins kind of way) that the book really isn't carrying.

Anyway, my question is, has anyone read this? Is it a book worth reading? Is it just me being to critical because the story isn't what I expected? Could I keep up with T. E. Lawrence if we rode motorcycles together?

I thought that the books were amazing, and got really angry at the book's for basically taking the name Bourne and slapping on a movie with nothing near the same plot. As you noted, pretty much EVERYTHING is different, and it only deviates more and more as you go on in the series.

But I really liked the book, partially just because, as someone else said, the hero's motivations are much more complex and interesting than most action/thriller heroes (as people have been bashing, cough Koontz cough). He's not trying to be moral, he's not really trying to survive, he's just obsessed with those parts of his forgotten history and Marie, along with having an interesting pseudo-multiple personality disorder.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby SecondTalon » Fri Dec 28, 2007 4:56 pm UTC

Narsil wrote:
The Great Hippo wrote:"Look, this is how the world works! This is how things should be! And I will prove it to you--by making up a totally fictional story that proves me right!" A lot of authors do this.

You would love Ayn Rand.


I lol'd

The Wheel of Time series past the second one... read the first one, and it was a good year or more before I got my hands on the second one (I think the fifth was just coming out) so my friends and I bought and read through 2-5 as quickly as possible, then six came out.. then seven... and... I kept waiting for it to get going and do something.

And.. it was like reading a narrative based on the Zeno's Paradox... each book being the characters realizing that to do the task they planned in the last book, they'd have to first get halfway there... and that was the entire book. Next book was the characters realizing that to finish the next half, they'd have to get halfway there... and so on. I could literally watch the whole thing coming to a slow, grinding halt.

Supposedly somewhere around 10 or something that problem was fixed, but.. I've lost all interest in finding out for myself. At this point, I'd rather read the phone book, as though the characters there are pretty one dimensional, they don't smooth their skirts and tug on their braids.
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heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Belial » Fri Dec 28, 2007 5:54 pm UTC

On watchmen:

JayDee wrote:
Spoiler:
It was Heroes Season 1 that convinced me. If the, um, bomb, had have gone off I would have hated it. It would have been a bad ending. That's the impression I got from Watchmen - that the bad guys* won. That's an ending that's very hard to pull of, and I don't think they did in Watchmen.


Spoiler:
I think it doesn't matter. If the bomb had gone off, if it hadn't gone off, either way, it's an afterthought. The real climax, the real point of interest, is the existence of the dilemma in the first place. The point where you realize "This guy wants to do something totally heinous, and he could very well be right!" is the interesting part.


Spoiler:
*I'm sure there are plenty would disagree on Ozymandius being a bad guy, but I'd say it's pretty clear if you judge on narrative structure alone.


Spoiler:
I think saying that he's the bad guy because he occupies the space normally occupied by a bad guy in the narrative structure is ignoring the point of the book: to subvert and blur the distinction between hero and villain. Just because Rorschach fights to save people doesn't make him good. Just because Ozymandias wants to destroy people doesn't make him bad. If anything, Ozymandias is too good, and too wounded by the evil and suffering in the world, and Rorschach too stubborn and callous to it.
addams wrote:A drunk neighbor is better than a sober Belial.


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Re:

Postby Pai » Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:24 pm UTC

Aetre wrote:Stranger In A Strange Land - Heinlein. Considering how my friends and the sci-fi community hyped this one up before I read it, I was expecting a much better book. Now all I get is, "Wait. HOW could you not like it?!" Well... Sorry, but it's really just not that great a story. It's sexist, preachy, and there's no plot after the halfway point, so it just drags on being sexist and preachy, with no redeeming plot value, for about two hundred pages. That, and it's a lesson to all authors that you should never, ever, ever overuse a non-neutral word. Because it tends to get annoying as hell by the end. Grok?


I agree with your opinion. The first half was interesting, then it got all 'hippy free-love commune' and I lost interest.
"I have never made but one prayer to God, a very short one: 'O Lord make my enemies ridiculous.' And God granted it." ~Voltaire

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby phlip » Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:54 pm UTC

I picked up a book called "01/01/00 12:01" (or something like that) out of a bargain bin at a bookshop once (I don't remember the exact title, and as you can imagine, plugging it into Google doesn't help much).
[edit]Amazon's search, however, is more useful than Google: R. J. Pineiro, 01-01-00[/edit]

Anyways, the first 80% of the book is your usual computer hackery, virus attacks, whatever... the usual pap written by someone who clearly doesn't know how computers work... but the story it was wrapped around was (just) good enough to keep me reading (that was the sort of story I was in the mood for at the time).

But then, you get to the end, and...
Spoiler:
It turns out that the major plot-point so far, a computer virus which was programmed to run at one minute past midnight UTC on the first day of 2000 (hence the book title), was actually written by Mayan aliens, and when 12:01 hits, the protagonists, who are all at the ruins of a Mayan city, suddenly become omniscient (for no adequately explained reason, just "aliens did it"... indeed, "aliens did it" is the explanation for most remaining plot threads, such as how the virus managed to infect almost every computer in the world without being detected, or why the virus's payload somehow couldn't be disassembled). The last two chapters are just an exposition data-dump, in the form of a conversation between the now-omniscient characters. This is followed by a brief random musing on the meaning of life, and then the book ends.


Seriously. WTF.
Last edited by phlip on Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:49 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby MotorToad » Tue Jan 15, 2008 12:19 am UTC

phlip wrote:
But then, you get to the end, and...
Spoiler:
It turns out that the major plot-point so far, a computer virus which was programmed to run at one minute past midnight UTC on the first day of 2000 (hence the book title), was actually written by Mayan aliens, and when 12:01 hits, the protagonists, who are all at the ruins of a Mayan city, suddenly become omniscient (for no adequately explained reason, just "aliens did it"... indeed, "aliens did it" is the explanation for most remaining plot threads, such as how the virus managed to infect almost every computer in the world without being detected, or why the virus's payload somehow couldn't be disassembled). The last two chapters are just an exposition data-dump, in the form of a conversation between the now-omniscient characters. This is followed by a brief random musing on the meaning of life, and then the book ends.


Seriously. WTF.
I don't think it's legal to kill an author for this, but I bet you don't get convicted! So long as the book is in evidence.
What did you bring the book I didn't want read out of up for?
"MAN YOUR WAY TO ANAL!" (An actual quote from another forum. Only four small errors from making sense.)

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Re: Books that you're disappointed in after having finished.

Postby Alibaba » Tue Jan 15, 2008 1:30 am UTC

Harry Potter and the blah blah blah (Number 7).

I didn't feel surprised enough by anything. The hype of someone dying had detached me from any of the characters, unlike when
Spoiler:
Sirius died.
Also, Brave New World.


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