favorite lines/quotes from books

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Do you underline, highlight, or in some way mark your favorite lines?

yes - easier to find them later
23
5%
yes - I usually mark books when I read so marking favorite lines is just part of the deal
19
4%
no - writing in a book is desecrating a book
318
62%
no - I don't usually find passages that I find worth marking
11
2%
sometimes - only if it's really good
66
13%
otter
73
14%
 
Total votes: 510

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matko5
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby matko5 » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:04 pm UTC

Rhaegar fought valiantly, Rhaegar fought nobly, Rhaegar fought bravely. And Rhaegar died.


HEEEEEEEEEELLO.

That's the best line EVER. It gives me chills every time I read it.
Hai.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby fjafjan » Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:46 pm UTC

I only ever Write in books when the Author has made a misstake, so when there is a typo, or even worse some actual miss in a calculation or such, I will correct it. Other than that I agree, I'd never write in a book
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby skellious » Thu Feb 11, 2010 9:38 pm UTC

I hate picking up errors in printed books but I cant help it, I naturally spot them, there are 4-5 at least in most novels...
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby matko5 » Fri Feb 12, 2010 5:34 am UTC

fjafjan wrote:I only ever Write in books when the Author has made a misstake, so when there is a typo, or even worse some actual miss in a calculation or such, I will correct it. Other than that I agree, I'd never write in a book


Yesterday I found a line in a programming book where it said:

2^8 = 1024

Thought it was pretty funny.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby ducknerd » Mon Feb 15, 2010 12:19 am UTC

Johnny Truant wrote:For a moment I was tempted. I could read the signs well enough to know she wanted a kiss. She'd always been fluent in that language of affection but I could also see that over the years, years of the same grammar, she'd lost the chance to understand others. It surprised me to discover I cared enough about her to act now on that knowledge, especially considering how lonely I was. I gave her an almost paternal hug and kissed her on the cheek. Above us airplanes roared for the sky.

This was just such a moving moment; Johnny coming out of his personal hell and doing something authentic and good for someone else. It's the way I want to think all the time.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby 123 » Thu Feb 18, 2010 5:59 am UTC

I would sit on the couch, can of beer in hand, watching survivor and thinking of an interesting variation of the game that would never make it to the network. If you simply add Dexter to the Castaways, and interpret the title a bit more literally...


Best quote ever in any of the Dexter books.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Thu Feb 18, 2010 2:19 pm UTC

123 wrote:
I would sit on the couch, can of beer in hand, watching survivor and thinking of an interesting variation of the game that would never make it to the network. If you simply add Dexter to the Castaways, and interpret the title a bit more literally...


Best quote ever in any of the Dexter books.

When I was 8 and Survivor was new, I actually thought this how it worked. I told my mom I didn't like the idea because "people die on that show!"
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby glitterbug12 » Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:21 pm UTC

Inkdeath, by Cornelia Funke wrote:
"Was there any more wretched existence than the life of a writer who had run out of words?"


It's not my favourite line or anything, but it came to mind because I decided to scribble it on a post-it when I first read it.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Decker » Sat Jun 19, 2010 7:23 pm UTC

From Umbrella Academy, Apocalypse Suite, a book about a madman creating a song that will end the world when played.
Brothers and sisters, listen to me! Gather your trumpets, your cellos, your harps! Lend me your lives and prepare for demise, for tonight we end the Umbrella Academy, and tomorrow we end the world...
I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby RabbitWho » Wed Jun 30, 2010 8:01 am UTC

If 63% of people have good sense then why do I always end up with the second hand books of the other 37%?

Underlining is like CAPS LOCKS to me. If I try to read a page with something underlined I shout those words in my head. Or I'm thinking.. why did he underline that.. what was he thinking.. what kind of a person was he... what significance did those lines hold for him, why didn't he underline that bit over there.. what makes this line important.. would I have noticed how important it was if it wasn't underlined...

If something had a highlighter pen the book is destroyed and needs to be recycled. I once read a copy of Romeo and Juliet that someone had gone through with a red pen and drawn huge red Xs across certain parts, maybe they were doing a performance and leaving out those bits.. but I doubt it because there was a huge red X over the "What's in a name" soliloquy.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Woopate » Sun Jul 04, 2010 5:46 am UTC

Sometimes a second hand book with notations, underlines, and highlights can be interesting. But I hate it when I get a book that looks like this:

Then Stacy drove an extra fifteen minutes to the supermarket in Carstairs to buy some pomegranites for her juicer. All the ones at her local grocer were old and bruised. Even though it didn't influence the taste of her juice, something about the knowledge that the pomegranite was bruised made her drink less sweet. After her drink, Stacy went across the province in search of her long lost lover who had betrayed her for some handsome Captain of the Swedish Foreign Legion.

Seriously. When the unhighlited words are fewer than the highlited words, I just ask myself why they bothered doing it in the first place.

Oh, and for quotes, "Stand and fight men of Gondor for this is your hour of doom!" Might be a paraphrase. Something about it just clicks with me.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Sun Jul 04, 2010 3:40 pm UTC

Sons of Gondor! Of Rohan! My brothers! I see in your eyes the same fear that would take the heart of me! A day may come when the courage of men fails, when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship. But it is not this day. An hour of wolves and shattered shields when the age of Men comes crashing down! But it is not this day! This day we fight! By all that you hold dear on this good Earth, I bid you stand! Men of the West!

That's from the movie. If the book has an analogous quote, Wikiquote doesn't have it and I have no copy of ROTK.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Woopate » Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:17 am UTC

The one I'm thinking of is from Gandalf. Next time I have an ROTK around, I'll track down the whole thing and put it up.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby KestrelLowing » Tue Jul 13, 2010 1:22 pm UTC

I'm afraid I have a horrible memory for quotes, so I don't have any to share :(

However, I cannot write in my books. Ever. It's sacrilegious, and wrong and horrible. (Actually, I have written in my bible - but it was the New Testament that was bound like a magazine. I wonder what kind of person that makes me...)

I think it might be because the books I read, I read for the plot, not necessarily the language. If someone has a decent idea for the plot, I'm good, even if their writing is only mediocre. I guess this makes me slightly immature in my reading tastes, but I want to be entertained by my books.

Also, I read far too quickly to ever stop to write something down.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sasquatch » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:14 pm UTC

It's been ages since I've read it, but the quote I remember most from any book I've read came from a Redwall series book. I don't remember which one it was, but it had Martin the warrior alive. Anyway, the quote was something along the lines of
If you die, I'll kill you!

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby MerquiseOperatic » Thu Jul 15, 2010 3:38 am UTC

Toni Morrison, Beloved wrote:Standing alone on the porch, Beloved is smiling. But now her hand is empty. Sethe is running away from her, running, and she feels the emptiness in the hand Sethe has been holding. Now she is running into the faces of the people out there, joining them and leaving Beloved behind. Alone. Again. Then Denver, running too. Away from her to the pile of people out there. They make a hill. A hill of black people, falling. And above them all, rising from his place with a whip in his hand, the man without skin, looking. He is looking at her.


First time I went through this book, this line more than anything else burned with a real, deep truth to it for me. It's probably the best aesthetic description of white supremacy / privilege and how that plays out even now, ingrained as it is in a whole bunch of different cultures, that I've seen put to paper in a fiction book.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby kinigget » Thu Jul 15, 2010 4:33 am UTC

I think it's from the Bellmaker, and I believe its constance the badger talking to rosie of the long patrol. Don't ask me how I remember all of that, I just do, I haven't even read that book in something like ten years.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sir Novelty Fashion » Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:14 am UTC

Hale knew, before he had been in Brighton three hours, that they meant to murder him.

- The opening sentence of Brighton Rock, by Graham Greene.

This perfect replica of an old English Manor, a notice said, like all the buildings of Whispering Glades, is constructed throughout of Grade A steel and concrete with foundations extending into solid rock. It is certified proof against fire, earthquake and . . . [nuclear fission was being painted in as Dennis read the plaque].

- The Loved One, Evelyn Waugh

A copy of Dante's Purgatorio excited his especial disgust.

"French, eh?" he said. "I guessed as much, and pretty dirty too, I shouldn't wonder. Now just you wait while I look up these here books"—how he said it!—"in my list. Particularly against books the Home Secretary is. If we can't stamp out literature in the country, we can at least stop its being brought in from outside."

- Vile Bodies, Evelyn Waugh

"The Beast stands for strong mutually antagonistic governments everywhere," he said. "Self-sufficiency at home, self-assertion abroad."

Lord Copper, in Scoop, by Evelyn Waugh

'Yes, sir,' said Jeeves in a low, cold voice, as if he had been bitten in the leg by a personal friend.

Carry On, Jeeves, PG Wodehouse

A certain critic—for such men, I regret to say, do exist—made the nasty remark about my last novel that it contained ‘all the old Wodehouse characters under different names’. He has probably now been eaten by bears, like the children who made mock of the prophet Elisha: but if he still survives he will not be able to make a similar charge against Summer Lightning. With my superior intelligence, I have outgeneralled this man by putting in all the old Wodehouse characters under the same names. Pretty silly it will make him feel, I rather fancy.

Preface to Summer Lightning, by P.G. Wodehouse. This always sends me into fits of laughter.

All right. Let's start with the basics, and see where we can go from there. This book is called Dead Romance. That's what O'm going to put on the cover, anyway, although it wasn't the first name I thought of. I was going to call it Living Space, but then it'd have "space" in the title, and you might expect it to be all about little bubble-headed rocket men, like you used to see on the covers of those old SF magazines before everyone started dropping acid and seeing Starchilds everywhere.

Opening lines, Dead Romance, Lawrence Miles.

2.41 Ur-Clich's

Imagine the quintessential Hollywood movie. Imagine that the wolrd, or the country (probably America), or just the characters, are under threat from an outside force: aliens if possible, foreigners otherwise, a virus if you get desperate. Now imagine that at the climax o the story, at that most dramatically crucial moment when the future hangs in the balance and the enemy's about to destroy everything that's good and right and civilised, the day is ultimately saved. Not by a weapon, and not by a brilliant strategy. No, ultimately the day is saved by... wait for it... the power of love.

You'd think it was the most devastating cliché imaginable.

Now name three films which actually end that way. To Hell with it, try to think of even one.

This Town Will Never Let Us Go, Lawrence Miles (p.124, to be precise)

(NB: Both quotes from Miles' novels here might imply that they aren't fiction - they are, but they both employ unreliable narrators, so directly address the audience, at least in parts.)
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Chuff » Mon Jul 26, 2010 6:47 am UTC

The building was on fire, and it wasn't my fault.
The opening line of Blood Rites, Book Six of Jim Butcher's Dresden Files. Harry Dresden is speaking.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby smw543 » Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:00 am UTC

Sir Novelty Fashion wrote:
Hale knew, before he had been in Brighton three hours, that they meant to murder him.
- The opening sentence of Brighton Rock, by Graham Greene.
I bought Brighton Rock, along with 5 other Greene novels, at Goodwill a while back for 50¢ a piece. I'm planning on a marathon reading session next week.
----------------------------
My mother is a fish.
-From Faulkner's As I Lay Dying. Five words; the everything2 writeup is 766 (spoiler warning). Reading Faulkner is like sweet torture for me—he's so damn good... and it constantly reminds me that I will never accomplish anything close.
Spoiler:
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Zohar » Wed Jul 28, 2010 6:46 am UTC

Just read this in The Last Watch, the fourth (and last for now) book in the excellent Watch series (the first book is The Night Watch). The hero meets an old acquaintance on a plane:
'What are you doing here?' I asked.
'Flying,' he replied stupidly.
But I was up to the challenge, and I asked an even more idiotic question.
'Where to?'

I thought that was pretty funny. :)
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sir Novelty Fashion » Wed Jul 28, 2010 5:17 pm UTC

smw543 wrote:
Sir Novelty Fashion wrote:
Hale knew, before he had been in Brighton three hours, that they meant to murder him.
- The opening sentence of Brighton Rock, by Graham Greene.
I bought Brighton Rock, along with 5 other Greene novels, at Goodwill a while back for 50¢ a piece. I'm planning on a marathon reading session next week.

Brighton Rock isn't generally considered one of Greene's best, but I thought it was pretty good. It does rely a lot on heaven/hell dualism and imagery, so if that's not your kind of thing, it may get a dull quickly. Also: be sure to watch the film of The Third Man, which is by Greene. It's awesome. :)
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sartorius » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:28 pm UTC

This has got to be my favorite quote in any science fiction book ever:

Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein wrote:I have never learned the co-ordinates of Sanctuary, nor the name or catalogue number of the star it orbits...But I can tell you what sort of a planet it is. Like Earth, but retarded.


I think I actually laughed when I came across it.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby melladh » Sun Aug 01, 2010 8:55 am UTC

Text or marks that clearly doesn't belong to the rest of the text breaks immersion for me. I'm walking on a dark, cobbled street, between wet stone walled houses, and snow is softly falling. I can hear nothing but the sound of my footsteps - that special crunchy sound they make when the stones under my soles are slightly dirty and slightly slippery, and suddenly... there's some writing in the margin that's commenting on what's going on from a reader's perspective, and I find myself being a reader instead - sitting on the noisy, crowded train where that damn teenager across from me won't have the decency to speak just a little more quietly into her cell phone - they can hear you from the next cart over damn it!

Bleeding print does that too, I just have a higher chance to be able to ignore it.

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One of my absolute favorite lines, not said by a character, just in the middle of the text (not an exact quote)
The Fourth Bear, by Jasper Fforde wrote:[He] accepted the explanation without questioning it, and you should too.


There's a beautiful section of The Diving Bell And The Butterfly that never made it into the movie as far as I remember (imho, they removed everything wonderful about the book in that movie) that I've only ever read in swedish, so pardon the poor translation attempt...
It's from the chapter "the empress", where he sits by a bust of Eugenie, which is protected by a glass case, and dreaming that he's actually spending time with the real person, as she visits the hospital.
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, by Jean-Dominique Bauby wrote:She didn't push me away. She pulled her fingers through my hair and said quietly "There, there, my child, you must be very patient." [...]
And then, one afternoon when I was confiding my sorrows to her, an unknown character came and stood between the portrait bust and myself. In the glass case there was the mirror image of a man who looked as if he had been lying in a dioxin barrel. The mouth was contorted, the nose damaged, the hair on end, the eyes filled with dread. One eye was sewn shut, and the other wide open like the eye of Cain. I glared at the dilated pupil for a while before I understood that it was actually me.
Then I was filled with a strange rush of joy. Not only was I lame, mute, half deaf, bereft of every pleasure and forced to a Medusa existence, I also looked appalling. I started laughing hysterically, a laugh triggered by all too many catastrophes gathering up, and after a last twist of fate you finally decide to meet the whole thing like it's a joke. My happy wheezes at first perplexed Eugenie, but then she gave in to my contagious cheerfulness. We laughed so hard that we cried.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby ririca » Thu Aug 05, 2010 4:33 am UTC

This is from Gabriel GarcÍa-Márquez's Memories of My Melancholy Whores:

When the storm had passed I still had the feeling I was not alone in the house. My only explanation is that just as real events are forgotten, some that never were can be in our memories as if they had happened. For if I evoked the emergency of the rainstorm, I did not see myself alone in the house but always accompanied by Delgadina. I had felt her so close during the night that I detected the sound of her breath in the bedroom and the throbbing of her cheek on my pillow. It was the only way I could understand how we could have done so much in such short a time. I remembered standing in the library footstool and I remembered her awake in her little flowered dress taking the books from me to put them in a safe place. I saw her run from one end of the house to the other battling the storm, drenched in rain and in water up to her ankles. I remembered how the next day she prepared a breakfast that never was and set the table while I dried the floors and set order upon the shipwreck of a house...

From then on I had her in my memory with so much clarity I could do what I wanted with her. I changed the color of her eyes according to my state of mind: the color of water when she woke, the color of syrup when she laughed, the color of light when she was annoyed. I dressed her according to the age and condition that suited my changes of mood: a novice in love at twenty, a parlor whore at forty, the queen of Babylon at seventy, a saint at one hundred.


I like the first part because it talks of memories -- the kind that never happened but remain with you. The second part is mostly lyrical.

This one is from (surprisingly) Paulo Coelho's The Fifth Mountain:
Everything that could have happened but did not is carried away with the wind and leaves no trace. Life is made of our attitudes. And there are certain things that the gods oblige us to live through. Their reason for this does not matter, and there is no action we can take to make them pass us by.


I think Coelho is overrated and that he simply struck gold with The Alchemist, but I took the quote above personally, hence I like it.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby johnny_7713 » Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:30 pm UTC

From Nation by Terry Pratchett, Locaha, the god of Death addresses Mau (the hero of the story):
'I recall no arrangement, Mau, no bargain, covenant, agreement or promise. There is what happens, and what does not happen. There is no 'should'.'


from Hogfather:

No. Humans need fantasy to be human. To be the place where the falling angel meets the rising ape.


and of course from Reaper Man

WHAT CAN THE HARVEST HOPE FOR, IF NOT THE CARE OF THE REAPER MAN


I could go on looking for and finding favourite Pratchett quotes for hours, but these are three that have stuck with me.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby rat4000 » Mon Aug 30, 2010 9:45 am UTC

"A fake smile and a real one may be similar, but they are as different as morning dawn and evening dusk. Can you separate dawn from dusk?" G. R. R. Martin, A Song of Ice and Fire

Maybe not exactly how it appeared in the book.
Last edited by rat4000 on Tue Aug 31, 2010 9:17 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby natraj » Mon Aug 30, 2010 3:06 pm UTC

Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell wrote:"Can a magician kill a man by magic?" Lord Wellington asked Strange.
Strange frowned. He seemed to dislike the question. "I suppose a magician might," he admitted, "but a gentleman never could."

-----

"Such nonsense!" declared Dr Greysteel. "Whoever heard of cats doing anything useful!"
"Except for staring at one in a supercilious manner," said Strange. "That has a sort of moral usefulness, I suppose, in making one feel uncomfortable and encouraging sober reflection upon one's imperfections."


That first one was already in here, but, man. I wish I had my copy of the book next to me because it has so many great quotes.

Also, Wodehouse is pretty much chock-full of hilarious quotability.

"He had just about enough intelligence to open his mouth when he wanted to eat, but certainly no more."

"Intoxicated? The word did not express it by a mile. He was oiled, boiled, fried, plastered, whiffled, sozzled, and blotto."

"I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled."

"It was as if Nature had intended to make a gorilla and then changed her mind at the last moment."

"I can detach myself from the world. If there is a better world to detach oneself from than the one functioning at the moment I have yet to hear of it."
You want to know the future, love? Then wait:
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Jesse » Thu Sep 02, 2010 9:44 am UTC

In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried, by Amy Hempel wrote:I think of the chimp, the one with the talking hands.
In the course of the experiment, that chimp had a baby.
Imagine how her trainers must have thrilled when the
mother, without prompting, began to sign to her newborn.
Baby, drink milk.
Baby, play ball.
And when the baby died, the mother stood over the body,
her wrinkled hands moving with animal grace, forming again
and again the words: Baby, come hug, Baby, come hug, fluent
now in the language of grief.


In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson Is Buried, by Amy Hempel wrote:What do I remember?
I remember only the useless things I hear -- that Bob
Dylan's mother invented Wite Out, that twenty-three
people must be in a room before there is a fifty-fifty chance two will
have the same birthday. Who cares whether or not it's true?
In my head there are bath towels swaddling this stuff.
Nothing else seeps through.

I review those things that will figure in the retelling: a kiss
through surgical guaze, the pale hand correcting the position
of the wig. I noted these gestures as they happened, not in
any retrospect -- though I don't know why looking back
should show us more than looking at.

It is just possible I will say I stayed the night.
And who is there that can say that I did not?


Amy Hempel is my hero, in all ways.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby andrewxc » Thu Sep 02, 2010 9:05 pm UTC

One of my friends was reading Prelude to Foundation by Asimov for the fifth or so time recently. He was woken up by his baby and after putting her down couldn't go back to sleep. He's been enthralled with all the sciences and been working on a doctorate in political science recently, so the whole Foundation series is essentially his Bible and, potentially, an idealistic target to aim for.

He was reading on the couch and jumped about a foot, almost knocking over his end-table, water and throwing the book across the room, when he read the first line where his bookmark was:
Isaac Asimov wrote:Sleep eluded Seldon. He tossed and turned in the dark, thinking.
"We never do anything well unless we love doing it for its own sake."
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Dave_Wise » Fri Sep 17, 2010 6:29 pm UTC

The very last line of 100 years of solitude is a brilliant end to the book. I won't spoil it for you, though.
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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Spots » Thu Oct 28, 2010 11:53 am UTC

My view on the poll topic is odd (then again, that's consistent with my character). I would never ever write anything into a printed book, not even an underline. I actually sometimes go a step further and download a pdf/word/html version of the book and read it on the computer/phone, leaving my printed copy in perfect shape. I write down my favorite lines and passages in a notebook or into a computer file. That way, they are easy to find and require no desecration of the source.
Having said that, if I get a book from a library or from a friend, I quite enjoy seeing little notes on margins. It adds a bit of character to the copy and makes it unique. As long as it doesn't cover the original text, I'd actually prefer a book that has that "added value".

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Euphonium » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:43 am UTC

Natasha threw off the shawl from her shoulders, ran forward to face 'Uncle,' and setting her arms akimbo, also made a motion with her shoulders and struck an attitude.

Where, how, and when had this young countess, educated by an emigree French governess, imbibed from the Russian air she breathed that spirit, and obtained that manner which the pas de chale would, one would have supposed, long ago have effaced? But the spirit and the movements were those inimitable and unteachable Russian ones that 'Uncle' had expected of her. As soon as she had struck her pose and smiled triumphantly, proudly, and with sly merriment, the fear that had at first seized Nicholas and the others that she might not do the right thing was at an end, and they were already admiring her.

She did the right thing with such precision, such complete precision, that Anisya Fedorovna, who had at once handed her the handkerchief she needed for the dance, had tears in her eyes, though she laughed as she watched this slim, graceful countess, reared in silks and velvets and so different from herself, who yet was able to understand all that was in Anisya and Anisya's father and mother and aunt, and in every Russian man and woman.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Euphonium » Fri Oct 29, 2010 12:51 am UTC

Felstaff wrote:"A battered book, ironically, is a well-loved book" ~~Now there's a good quote. And it's by me.


I still have my old Boy Scout Handbook. It is an excellent example of this maxim.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby serhina » Tue Nov 02, 2010 1:33 am UTC

I dislike writing in fiction books. Like I've seen mentioned a few times before, it just detracts from the story for me. I'd prefer not to get distracted by my previous notes. Or other people's...one of the best examples I have of this is a book that I bought used, and then as I was reading it discovered that the previous owner had white-outed every swear word or mention of God, and replaced them with various nonsense words (I don't have the book with me currently, or I'd give some examples). It's kind of hilarious to me that someone was that offended or something by it that they went to all the trouble of "fixing" the book, but at the same time I was unhappy with it because every time I encountered one of their markings I'd stop and think about their motives, or try to figure out what word they had covered up, instead of being able to focus on the story like I like to do.

So yeah, no writing in novels for me. Textbooks though, I have no problem with marking up as much as I need/want to. If a quote really strikes me, I'll copy it down or write down the page number so I can find it later. I don't have too many, as it has to really hit me somehow that it's worth writing down, otherwise it just stays in the book so I can read it again later :) This is the most recent one, it just hit me as really true or relevant or something, but whatever the reason, I really like it.
Xavier Harkonnen, Dune: The Butlerian Jihad wrote:Even the expected can be a terrible shock when we have been holding on to threads of hope.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby Sir Novelty Fashion » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:49 pm UTC

Oh, a couple of favourite quotes I forgot before:
And frenssh she spak ful faire and fetisly,
After the scole of Stratford atte Bowe,
For Frenssh of Parys was to hire unknowe.

- The Prioress, the General Prologue, the Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer.

Nor public flame, nor private, dares to shine;
Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine!
Lo! thy dread empire Chaos! is restored:
Light dies before thy uncreating word;
Thy hand, great Anarch! lets the curtain fall,
And universal darkness buries all.

The Dunciad, Alexander Pope.

‘You and Julia…’ she said. And then, as we moved on towards the house, ‘When you met me last night did you think, “Poor Cordelia, such an engaging child, grown up a plain and pious spinster, full of good works”? Did you think “thwarted”?’

It was no time for prevarication. ‘Yes,’ I said, ‘I did; I don’t now, so much.’

‘It’s funny,’ she said, ‘that’s exactly the word I thought of for you and Julia. When we were up in the nursery with nanny. “Thwarted passion,” I thought.’

Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh

“I need hardly say there was a collision. The pessimists all round me looked anxiously from one Professor to the other Professor to see which was really the more feeble. But I won. An old man in poor health, like my rival, could not be expected to be so impressively feeble as a young actor in the prime of life. You see, he really had paralysis, and working within this definite limitation, he couldn’t be so jolly paralytic as I was. Then he tried to blast my claims intellectually. I countered that by a very simple dodge. Whenever he said something that nobody but he could understand, I replied with something which I could not even understand myself. ‘I don’t fancy,’ he said, ‘that you could have worked out the principle that evolution is only negation, since there inheres in it the introduction of lacuna, which are an essential of differentiation.’ I replied quite scornfully, ‘You read all that up in Pinckwerts; the notion that involution functioned eugenically was exposed long ago by Glumpe.’ It is unnecessary for me to say that there never were such people as Pinckwerts and Glumpe. But the people all round (rather to my surprise) seemed to remember them quite well, and the Professor, finding that the learned and mysterious method left him rather at the mercy of an enemy slightly deficient in scruples, fell back upon a more popular form of wit. ‘I see,’ he sneered, ‘you prevail like the false pig in Æsop.’ ‘And you fail,’ I answered, smiling, ‘like the hedgehog in Montaigne.’ Need I say that there is no hedgehog in Montaigne? ‘Your claptrap comes off,’ he said; ‘so would your beard.’ I had no intelligent answer to this, which was quite true and rather witty. But I laughed heartily, answered, ‘Like the Pantheist’s boots,’ at random, and turned on my heel with all the honours of victory. The real Professor was thrown out, but not with violence, though one man tried very patiently to pull off his nose. He is now, I believe, received everywhere in Europe as a delightful impostor. His apparent earnestness and anger, you see, make him all the more entertaining.”

The Man Who Was Thursday, GK Chesterton
The art of advertisement, after the American manner, has introduced into all our life such a lavish use of superlatives, that no standard of value whatever is intact.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby melladh » Fri Nov 05, 2010 10:44 pm UTC

I'm having my boyfriend read Hogfather and was just reminded of this wonderful bit

"No sense in bein' bashful about goin' bald. Anyway, you know what they say about bald men, Dean."
"Yes, they say, 'Look at him, he's got no hair.'"
Image Image

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby rat4000 » Tue Nov 09, 2010 10:06 pm UTC

I read most quotes that get posted here, and bought Snow Crash because of one of them; this because perhaps people will post more knowing other people read them.

That said, have some Cormac McCarthy ("All the Pretty Horses").

There was an old horseskull in the brush and he squatted and picked it up and turned it in his hands. Frail and brittle. Bleached paper white. He squatted in the long light holding it, the comicbook teeth loose in their sockets. The joints in the cranium like a ragged welding of the bone plates. The muted run of sand in the brainbox when he turned it.

What he loved in horses was what he loved in men, the blood and the heat of the blood that ran them. All his reverence and all his fondness and all the leanings of his life were for the ardenthearted and they would always be so and never be otherwise.

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby deborahrjackson » Tue Sep 16, 2014 6:27 am UTC

I have been reading the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and love this one:

"He could out-superintend any boy I ever see. He knowed how to do everything."

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Re: favorite lines/quotes from books

Postby charlizebe » Wed Apr 15, 2015 2:12 pm UTC

A. A. Milne: "God, grant that we wanted as we did not want to".
"Why is it so hard sometimes to talk about? Instead, requests for explanations serve cold stares . Instead of a joke - silence. We need to talk like good food , and voluntarily choose emotional anorexia. In the middle of everything screams talk to me ! embrace me! love me! and the only thing that comes out of our mouths are words that do not have any meaning ."
- Jaroslaw Borszewicz


My favourite.


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