What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

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peter
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Postby peter » Sat Apr 14, 2007 10:23 pm UTC

The last book I read was The Firm by John Grisham.

Currently, I'm reading The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie.

Both excellent.

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Postby Pebbles » Tue Apr 24, 2007 7:20 am UTC

Im so lost at the moment. First month not working in my bookstore and i have nothing to read :(
any recommendations?
light fantasy, slightly sci-fi, funny, interesting ideas, explorations of different types of people... i know thats kinda vague.. but anything come to mind?
If nothing comes to mind just tell me your favourite or one of your most liked books and ill check that out instead, i really NEED something new to read.
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.
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Postby Alisto » Tue Apr 24, 2007 7:29 am UTC

I found myself unable to dive into Cryptonomicon. I needed something with less... volume to take to school, so I'm about halfway through Neverwhere. After that, I'll blow through the Harry Potter series so I can finally be caught up for the final book. (I've only read the first book so far)
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Postby OmenPigeon » Tue Apr 24, 2007 7:37 am UTC

Alisto wrote:After that, I'll blow through the Harry Potter series so I can finally be caught up for the final book. (I've only read the first book so far)


My favorite part of the Harry Potter books is how they're light enough that I can read them with little to no effort but long enough that it takes a while. So I sit down with a sandwich and a glass of water and do nothing but read for, like, eight hours. It's wonderful.
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Pebbles
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Postby Pebbles » Tue Apr 24, 2007 7:48 am UTC

ive kinda avoided reading harry potter ever since the first book was shoved down my throat years ago in school. School tends to ruin alot of things like that. I cant even read Brave New World anymore, despite the fact that i read it and loved it long before we studied it in school. sad.
Neverwhere was great though, im assuming you mean the one by Neil Gaiman
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Postby Belial » Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:20 pm UTC

Heh. Neverwhere. Probably the only novelization of a TV show that's worth reading...
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Postby Castaway » Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:41 pm UTC

Right now i'm reading The Corrections (which is fucking hilarious) and Grapes of Wrath for school. I hate John Steinbeck, his characters cannot conjugate their verbs.

I'm also rereading A Clockwork Orange, which is one of my favorite books.
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Postby fjafjan » Tue Apr 24, 2007 3:08 pm UTC

Is it a book?
The Warsun Prophecies - Penny arcade book 3

It had the funniest fore word I've ever read
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Postby miakoda » Tue Apr 24, 2007 3:55 pm UTC

I'm re-reading Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos series. Vlad is absolutely the funniest, most cynical human assassin ever to stick his nose into organized crime. And I mean that in an excellent way.

A friend also gave me the Doom Patrol TPBs to read. Haven't gotten to them yet. He assures me they're awful and yet impossible to put down, especially once Grant Morrison gets hold of the series.

One end of my dining room table is completely full of stacked books yet to be read. I actually had to organize them in stacks based on who lent them to me. :oops:

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Postby Jauss » Thu Apr 26, 2007 4:36 pm UTC

First I'll comment on some of the books already mentioned here.

I love the Ender series. I've read all of the Ender Quartet at least a couple of times, Speaker more than the latter two, and Ender's Game the most with several (5 or so) readings. Those books had a large influence on the way I think about things. I've only read and/or skimmed the Bean Quartet once so I'll have to do that again when I'm in the mood to explode my head and break my heart. I just found out about the upcoming books by reading this thread and I can't wait! The only other Card I've read was Hart's Hope. That book was fucked up.

I love Snow Crash and plan to re-read it again soon. I've started The Diamond Age a couple times, but have failed to read past the first few chapters. I will have to try again someday and finally check out Cryptonomicon as well.

I also love The Perks of Being a Wallflower and have to go back and read that every so often. I know about pick-ups and those certain songs and feeling infinite...

I've never read Dune. My only exposure has been watching the Children of Dune mini-series. *Hides* I plan to remedy that though.

I've been recommended House of Leaves on numerous occasions, but I'm scared to read it. My imagination is too strong for my own good and I already creep myself out sometimes.

The only Gaiman I've read was parts of Neverwhere. I'm plotting to get some Sandman and swipe American Gods from my housemate.

I have lots of good Wheel of Time memories. I first got into them when I was 13 and the first 6 were out. I raced through them that summer. I read them all again before reading the 10th book. TDR, LoC, and CoS also got a couple more readings than the rest. Now I have the 11th, but haven't read it yet. I think I'll have to be in a certain mood to jump back in, probably need a refresher course in all the goings on. But yeah, this was my Lord of the Rings (of which I've only read most of Fellowship so far), my introduction into complex fantasy worlds and getting lost therein. I had the guide book and everything. :)

Eastern Standard Tribe is good times. I totally belonged to PST before I lived here. :)

As for stuff I'm reading/just read:

*The Finder series by Carla Speed McNeil. Freaking awesome "anthropological sci-fi" graphic novels.

*Concrete Vol. 7: The Human Dilemma. (I've been on a graphic novel kick since being properly introduced to their awesomeness a year or so ago.) I liked it a lot and will be looking for the others.

Other books I love and recommend are:

*The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
*The Empty Crown by Rosemary Edghill
*The Young Wizard series and related books by Diane Duane
*The Continuum Concept - Jean Liedloff
*The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How To Get A Real Life and Education. The book that got me to leave high school as a sophmore, travel the US and Canada at 17, and meet most of the many people I'm friends with (and live with) now. Yay unschooling, Quo Vadis and NBSTC!

Edit: Damn, my posts are long. :oops:
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Postby headosaur » Thu Apr 26, 2007 7:20 pm UTC

Currently reading The Man Who Loved Only Numbers, and I just picked up Thirst for Love by Yukio Mishima, so I'll probably read that next. Not much other than that! I'd like to read George RR Martin's books again before the next one comes out, but I don't want to start them too early and have to wait another year or something.

Also, Neal Stephenson is for yes. Cyptonomicon took me a while to get into though.

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Postby bbctol » Thu Apr 26, 2007 8:10 pm UTC

Finally finished The Diamond Age, holy fuck that was good, but it's by Neal Stephenson so you know it must be.

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Postby OmenPigeon » Fri Apr 27, 2007 1:20 am UTC

Finally, finally got done with Thus Spake Zarathustra, the last piece of Nietzsche I have to read for class. Now I can go read something other than the mad rantings of a cranky, dead German.

Richard Brautigan, methinks.
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Postby damienthebloody » Fri Apr 27, 2007 9:27 am UTC

bbctol wrote:Finally finished The Diamond Age, holy fuck that was good, but it's by Neal Stephenson so you know it must be.

goddamn i loved that book. i was in a seminar today about human-machine interaction stuff, and i couldn't stop thinking about the diamond age (and to a lesser extent, snow crash).
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Postby caladbolg » Fri Apr 27, 2007 2:01 pm UTC

Pebbles wrote:Im so lost at the moment. First month not working in my bookstore and i have nothing to read :(
any recommendations?
light fantasy, slightly sci-fi, funny, interesting ideas, explorations of different types of people... i know thats kinda vague.. but anything come to mind?
If nothing comes to mind just tell me your favourite or one of your most liked books and ill check that out instead, i really NEED something new to read.

Is it even remotely possible that you haven't read Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy yet. If not, go, run and buy it now. It is by Douglas Adams and it is HILARIOUS. And it fits every one of those criterion.

Edit: Its a five book Trilogy if you're in to that sort of thing...
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Postby JuliaGlass » Sat Apr 28, 2007 2:37 am UTC

I'm reading an encyclopedia set.
Well, minus the first book, because the friend that gave the set to me lost it. I am missing most of the letter A.

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Postby Akira » Sat Apr 28, 2007 3:09 am UTC

caladbolg wrote:Its a five book Trilogy if you're in to that sort of thing...


First time I read the series, I was like... "Whoa, this guy can't count."

Then, as time wore on, I understood more of the books... and I got it.

Looking back, I was so stupid. *nod*
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Postby Zach » Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:46 am UTC

I finally picked up House of Leaves. It's a bit hard to follow, but interesting so far. I'd like to see where Danielewski takes it.

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Postby Shro » Sun Apr 29, 2007 3:08 am UTC

Has anyone read The Namesake?

It's by Jhumpa Lahiri, who happens to be Bengali. I also happen to be Bengali. She happened to have won a Pulitzer Prize for Interpreter of Maladies, which is a collection of short stories. I also happened to have won a Pulitz---no wait.

Anyway, her stuff resonates hardcore with me... It's very powerful stuff, even if you aren't sons or daughters of immigrants. The bf likes it, and he's white bread American.

And I hear the movie is really good too. The movie poster is really pretty anyway.
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Postby apricity » Sun Apr 29, 2007 3:14 am UTC

argyl3 wrote:Has anyone read The Namesake?

It's by Jhumpa Lahiri, who happens to be Bengali. I also happen to be Bengali. She happened to have won a Pulitzer Prize for Interpreter of Maladies, which is a collection of short stories. I also happened to have won a Pulitz---no wait.

Anyway, her stuff resonates hardcore with me... It's very powerful stuff, even if you aren't sons or daughters of immigrants. The bf likes it, and he's white bread American.

And I hear the movie is really good too. The movie poster is really pretty anyway.


I read both, The Namesake twice, and also saw the movie. I LOVED the movie, possibly even more than the book, which I also adore. Everything about Indian culture is fascinating to me, and a lot of that is due to how awesome her books are. Honestly, being white bread American myself, I envy everyone who has culture like that in their lives, and reading about it is the closest I can get.
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Postby Shro » Sun Apr 29, 2007 3:30 am UTC

lanicita wrote:I read both, The Namesake twice, and also saw the movie. I LOVED the movie, possibly even more than the book, which I also adore. Everything about Indian culture is fascinating to me, and a lot of that is due to how awesome her books are. Honestly, being white bread American myself, I envy everyone who has culture like that in their lives, and reading about it is the closest I can get.


All you need to get culture is to marry into it.

All kidding aside, sometimes it's SO weird thing about my heritage that way. Sure, it's something that other people don't have, but it's always been such an integral part of me that I hardly notice the fact that I'm all that different anymore. Some of the glamor of another culture is somewhat parallel to the glamor of a new boy. Amazingly novel and intriguing at first, but you realize its faults once you get to know it better. One of my favorite things about my heritage is its vibrancy... the fearlessness to be loud and colorful and noticed, even if it's something that other people might not understand.
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Postby zydehkim » Sun Apr 29, 2007 5:15 am UTC

I just read The Children of Húrin, the newly released Tolkien book. I've never really gotten into the Middle Earth universe. Tolkien's exhaustive world-building attracts some people, but it bores me to tears; who wants to read dry family histories of fictional tribes of fictional races of a fictional world? Okay, enough ranting. The book was actually pretty good. Its like a darker, condensed version of the Lord of the Rings fit into the Hobbit's story structure.
Next, I think I'll attempt to read A Void, the english translation of la Disparition by Georges Perec. You know, the book without any E's.
That or Kerouac's On the Road.

Edit:

In between my last post and this one, I read through the His Dark Materials trilogy. All I have to say is that I could kick myself for letting my younger self miss that. I wasted my time reading the Lord of the Rings during the time I could have been reading that! I really hope they don't screw up the movie.
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Postby Trooth » Sun Apr 29, 2007 5:28 am UTC

I'm reading Gulliver's Travels. :)

I just thought it would be a worthwhile read due to some obscure references to it that are evidently present in The Littl' Bits... In foreign versions of it anyway... I know that in Spanish, it's said that they live in Liliput, (an island existing in the book) and in French, they are called Liliputiens (similar to Lilliputians, the name given to the island's inhabitants). It's turning out to be a really good read anyway. I'm just about done with the whole area regarding Lilliput and Blefuscu.
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Postby Anmorata » Sun Apr 29, 2007 5:31 am UTC

I just picked up Slaughterhouse Five today.. hoping to have time to read it, though I might not until after finals.
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Postby damienthebloody » Sun Apr 29, 2007 6:34 am UTC

Anmorata wrote:I just picked up Slaughterhouse Five today.. hoping to have time to read it, though I might not until after finals.

:)

that's a fine, fine book.
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Postby apricity » Sun Apr 29, 2007 6:41 am UTC

argyl3 wrote:All you need to get culture is to marry into it.

All kidding aside, sometimes it's SO weird thing about my heritage that way. Sure, it's something that other people don't have, but it's always been such an integral part of me that I hardly notice the fact that I'm all that different anymore. Some of the glamor of another culture is somewhat parallel to the glamor of a new boy. Amazingly novel and intriguing at first, but you realize its faults once you get to know it better. One of my favorite things about my heritage is its vibrancy... the fearlessness to be loud and colorful and noticed, even if it's something that other people might not understand.


Hmm, maybe that's why I'm always attracted to Indian guys! :)

I do love the vibrancy of the Bengali culture. And I really love all the tradition. I can understand why if you grow up with it it's not so amazing to you, but to someone like me who grew up with hardly any exposure to any kind of culture, even religion-based, it's so exciting to think about what it must be like for you to have a community like that, something so stable over time and with a sort of built-in aspect to your identity.
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Postby Pebbles » Sun Apr 29, 2007 12:41 pm UTC

caladbolg wrote:
Pebbles wrote:Im so lost at the moment. First month not working in my bookstore and i have nothing to read :(
any recommendations?
light fantasy, slightly sci-fi, funny, interesting ideas, explorations of different types of people... i know thats kinda vague.. but anything come to mind?
If nothing comes to mind just tell me your favourite or one of your most liked books and ill check that out instead, i really NEED something new to read.

Is it even remotely possible that you haven't read Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy yet. If not, go, run and buy it now. It is by Douglas Adams and it is HILARIOUS. And it fits every one of those criterion.

Edit: Its a five book Trilogy if you're in to that sort of thing...


haha yeah I have read it.. all five.. altho they get a bit iffy after awhile they are still fantastic pieces of creativity. While on this topic Douglas Adams wrote other books.. shockingly enough. Dirk Gently. Check him out, I think I like the two Dirk Gently books better than the HitchHikers Guide.
She only looked away for a moment, and the mask slipped, and you fell. All your tomorrows start here.

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Postby Hawknc » Sun Apr 29, 2007 12:48 pm UTC

I've read about three and a half books so far, aside from breaking my brain it's good fun. :)

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Postby JuliaGlass » Sun Apr 29, 2007 9:40 pm UTC

I'm on C now.

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Postby Narsil » Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:34 pm UTC

I just finished The Count of Monte Cristo today. All I can say is that it's the greatest book I have ever read. Anyone out there who has not read it yet is doing themselves a great disservice.

Now I am reading the first unread thing on my shelf, which happens to be Stephen King's Insomnia. It's good, but honestly "Monte Cristo" is a wee bit of a tough act to follow.
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Postby bookishbunny » Tue May 01, 2007 5:27 pm UTC

My currents are:

The Scar by China Meiville (almost done with that one)

Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind by David Quammen

In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez

The Killing Doll by Ruth Rendell (that's my office read)

I'm also half-way through Cages by Dave McKean, but I'm missing some issues.
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Postby miakoda » Tue May 01, 2007 5:49 pm UTC

bookishbunny wrote:The Scar by China Meiville (almost done with that one)


This is going to sound funny, but ... I can't read China's books. I read King Rat and Perdido Street Station, and while he is an excellent writer, I felt like I needed a shower every time I put the book down. Seriously. Everything in his books is filthy, rotting and/or disease-ridden. And if you could see my desk, you'd know I'm most definitely not a neat freak.

The only exception to this was his most excellent children's novel, Un-Lun-Dun, which I highly recommend. I mean ... still with the grime and trash, but in a very cute Gaiman-esque fantasy kind of way.
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Postby bookishbunny » Tue May 01, 2007 5:58 pm UTC

miakoda wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:The Scar by China Meiville (almost done with that one)


maikoda wrote:This is going to sound funny, but ... I can't read China's books.


You are a bad, bad person.


maikoda wrote:The only exception to this was his most excellent children's novel,
Un-Lun-Dun, which I highly recommend. I mean ... still with the grime and trash, but in a very cute Gaiman-esque fantasy kind of way.


I have this on my shelf as we speak! I found a copy at the local book-brothel and it was the last one. I didn't even know it was out. I hope to get to it in the next month or so.[/quote]
Last edited by bookishbunny on Tue May 01, 2007 6:32 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby caladbolg » Tue May 01, 2007 6:24 pm UTC

Pebbles wrote:
caladbolg wrote:
Pebbles wrote:Im so lost at the moment. First month not working in my bookstore and i have nothing to read :(
any recommendations?
light fantasy, slightly sci-fi, funny, interesting ideas, explorations of different types of people... i know thats kinda vague.. but anything come to mind?
If nothing comes to mind just tell me your favourite or one of your most liked books and ill check that out instead, i really NEED something new to read.

Is it even remotely possible that you haven't read Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy yet. If not, go, run and buy it now. It is by Douglas Adams and it is HILARIOUS. And it fits every one of those criterion.

Edit: Its a five book Trilogy if you're in to that sort of thing...


haha yeah I have read it.. all five.. altho they get a bit iffy after awhile they are still fantastic pieces of creativity. While on this topic Douglas Adams wrote other books.. shockingly enough. Dirk Gently. Check him out, I think I like the two Dirk Gently books better than the HitchHikers Guide.


Dirk Gently is awesome, too. Just like the first three books of the HGTG, there are some parts where I just have to put the book down and giggle merrily to myself.
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Postby bookishbunny » Tue May 01, 2007 6:27 pm UTC

calabolg wrote:Dirk Gently is awesome, too. Just like the first three books of the HGTG, there are some parts where I just have to put the book down and giggle merrily to myself.


I loved the Dirk Gently books, too.
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Postby JuliaGlass » Tue May 01, 2007 6:46 pm UTC

Holy mackerel, I just remembered that I haven't read those yet. Ordering now.

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Postby Jauss » Tue May 01, 2007 7:40 pm UTC

The day of my last post (Thursday) I spent way too much on some notebooks and journals and the following:

American Gods - Neil Gaiman

Dune - Frank Herbert

Concrete Vol. 2: Heights - Paul Chadwick

Island of the Sequined Love Nun - Christopher Moore

Catch-22 - Joseph Heller

Wolf Tales II - Kate Douglas (everyone needs werewolf erotica, right? :) )

and a copy of Ender's Game to give to a moving friend (I have like, 4 or more friends/housemates who've never read it. :shock:)

That's what I get for reading this thread right before going to Powells. I think I'll start with American Gods.

I've been meaning to see The Namesake and perhaps read it as well. Yay culture!

Edit: Regarding the mentions of His Dark Materials, if you're a big dork like me go here and click on dæmons. Make your own!
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Postby damienthebloody » Wed May 02, 2007 2:11 pm UTC

bookishbunny wrote:
miakoda wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:The Scar by China Meiville (almost done with that one)


maikoda wrote:This is going to sound funny, but ... I can't read China's books.


You are a bad, bad person.
[/quote]

ooh, china mieville. i read perdido street station, and enjoyed it muchly, especially the slimy ickyness of it all. so i'm wondering - what should i read next?
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bookishbunny
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Postby bookishbunny » Wed May 02, 2007 2:20 pm UTC

damienthebloody wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:
miakoda wrote:
bookishbunny wrote:The Scar by China Meiville (almost done with that one)


maikoda wrote:This is going to sound funny, but ... I can't read China's books.


You are a bad, bad person.


ooh, china mieville. i read perdido street station, and enjoyed it muchly, especially the slimy ickyness of it all. so i'm wondering - what should i read next?


I just finished The Scar last night. Loved it, though slightly less than Perdido. For a creepy, quick graphic novel read, I'd suggest Mr. Punch by Neil Gaiman.
~Some people are like Slinkies - not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you push them down the stairs.

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Postby Scarblac » Wed May 02, 2007 2:46 pm UTC

I love Mieville, and Gaiman. Automatically order all their books.

Recently, Charles Stross has also made it to that list. I read The Atrocity Archives, Singularity Sky and Iron Sunrise, and now I'm going to order his other SF as well, saving the fantasy for later.

It's great to read books where you feel you must be the only person in the world to get all the little nerdy references :-) The Atrocity Archives especially should appeal to xkcd readers. What if Turing actually discovered math constructs that allow summoning Lovecraftian monsters?

Amazon wishlist currently included the usual bunch of programming books, the MIT encyclopedia of cognitive science, and chess books. Mostly.


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