What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

A slow, analog alternative to the internet

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

cv4
Posts: 138
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:32 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby cv4 » Sun Aug 01, 2010 2:12 am UTC

I was in need of books and Chapters had a Buy 2, Get 1 Free deal on pocket paperbacks. Ending up picking up

Starship Troopers
A Feast For Crows
American Gods
His Majesty's Dragon
Foundation
Mona Lisa Overdrive
Neverwhere
The Time Machine/The Invisible Man
Animal Farm

Normally I buy my books on Amazon but these were all ~ the same price as online, so it worked out good. Now just have to decide what to read.

User avatar
viscusanima
Posts: 352
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 6:39 am UTC
Location: Cyprus!

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby viscusanima » Tue Aug 03, 2010 10:02 pm UTC

Currently reading a book called The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine by James le Fanu. It's really interesting, there's an extended prologue (about 200 pages) which details the 12 defining moments of 20th century medicine, which is incredibly enlightening. However, I've just gotten to 'The Fall' and it's taken a turn for the pessimistic and depressing, which is sad. I don't like pessimistic outlooks, especially regarding something I want to move into as a career. I've got enough trouble with people trying to put me off already!

User avatar
Ishindri
Posts: 534
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:52 pm UTC
Location: Maryland, USA

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Ishindri » Wed Aug 04, 2010 4:20 am UTC

Just finished Fine Structure, an online sci-fi novella. Really a fantastic read. It's hard to absorb all the detail and threads on just one reading, though. Just the way I like it.
All is well. We are not like the others.

Chuff
CHOO CHOO I'M A TRAIN
Posts: 1018
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 8:45 am UTC
Location: The Purple Valley, Mass

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Chuff » Wed Aug 04, 2010 5:49 am UTC

Reading Emma right now. She annoys me but the pages turn so I guess I'm enjoying it.
The Great Hippo wrote:The internet's chief exports are cute kittens, porn, and Reasons Why You Are Completely Fucking Wrong.
addams wrote:How human of him. "If, they can do it, then, I can do it." Humans. Pfft. Poor us.

ImagingGeek
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:41 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Sat Aug 07, 2010 4:55 pm UTC

Working my way through the foundation series. On book four of the original series. Its OK, but I really don't see why its as famous as it is. Good yes, exceptional, no.

Please don't shoot me :?

Bryan
I have a new blog, on making beer.

Not that anyone reads it...

User avatar
ian
Posts: 706
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 3:55 pm UTC
Location: Sealand

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ian » Tue Aug 10, 2010 7:10 pm UTC

ImagingGeek wrote:Working my way through the foundation series. On book four of the original series. Its OK, but I really don't see why its as famous as it is. Good yes, exceptional, no.

Please don't shoot me :?

Bryan


It's no longer exceptional because it has influenced everything, thus it no longer stands out as individual.

ImagingGeek
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:41 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Tue Aug 10, 2010 11:17 pm UTC

ian wrote:
ImagingGeek wrote:Working my way through the foundation series. On book four of the original series. Its OK, but I really don't see why its as famous as it is. Good yes, exceptional, no.

Please don't shoot me :?

Bryan


It's no longer exceptional because it has influenced everything, thus it no longer stands out as individual.


That wasn't really how it was bothering me. I'm somewhat of a fan of "hard" sci-fi (i.e. fiction actually based on real science, vs. fantasy novels that happen to have spaceships). I thought going in that was what the foundation series would be - I've read some of his "robot" books in the past, and while they pushed the edge of credibility they still managed to stay on the credible side of the line. The foundation series started with a science-cred problem, and by book 2 had given up all trappings of being vaguely scientific. That was disappointing.

Those issues aside, I'm also not overly impressed with the overall story. Hollow characters, unreasonable jumps in the story, deus ex machina as a standard plotline, etc.

As I said, please don't shoot me :?

Bryan
I have a new blog, on making beer.

Not that anyone reads it...

User avatar
JayDee
Posts: 3620
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:13 am UTC
Location: Most livable city in the world.
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby JayDee » Wed Aug 11, 2010 12:45 am UTC

ImagingGeek wrote:The foundation series started with a science-cred problem, and by book 2 had given up all trappings of being vaguely scientific. That was disappointing.
Part of that is science marching on. When it was written it wasn't so far from plausible. I've read comments from Asimov (or Clarke, maybe) about sci-fi with various psychic themes - at the time, they hadn't been so thoroughly falsified. (I loved the first ~four stories, everything up to the introduction of the Mule, personally.) If Foundation doesn't seem like hard sf that's because the goalposts have moved since it was written.
ImagingGeek wrote:Those issues aside, I'm also not overly impressed with the overall story. Hollow characters, unreasonable jumps in the story, deus ex machina as a standard plotline, etc.
Those are all pretty reasonable criticisms. The jumps tend to come from the fact the books are collections of short stories from magazines, printed years apart. Short stories which tend to be idea focused rather than plot or character or setting, etc. So they rise and fall on those ideas. Which are a little dated. Mileage varies on how much that matters to an individual.

---

I'm currently reading a bunch of non-fiction. Including:

The Ambitions of Curiosity compares the beginnings of science in ancient Greece and China, asking various interesting questions. Fascinating stuff, and recommended to anyone interested in the history of science but who has only ever looked at the branch of history leading back to Egypt / Greece.

Last night I read The Cognitive Style of Powerpoint by Edward Tufte. Solid argument and solid presentation about something that I've vaguely railed against for years. I'm not sure I'm going to be able to easily tolerate many of my lectures this week.

Slowly making my way through The Big History Question: Snapshots of Australian History, a collection of essays adapted from a radio show. Short (a couple of pages) pieces answering questions like "Why was Sydney selected for the Second Coming of Christ? Who was the mysterious 'Great Teacher' and how was he to manifest his authority? Why was an amphitheatre built facing Sydney Heads?" or "What was the secret life of Governor Arthur Phillip? How did international espionage play a central role in Australia's early colonial history? And when is a scientific expedition not a scientific expedition?" So many interesting little things that tend to be left out of most formal history education in this country. It's criminal.

And slower still I'm reading the short stories collected in Asimov's Mysteries. He was apparently told that science fiction mysteries couldn't be written (because the readers wouldn't know all the rules!) and thought that was nonsense, then set out to write a murder mystery on the moon. Solid mystery shorts in science fiction settings, that tend hinge on scientific principles and follow the rules and conventions of the genre. Both genres. Plus there is an emphasis on chemistry which I do appreciate.
The Mighty Thesaurus wrote:I believe that everything can and must be joked about.
Hawknc wrote:I like to think that he hasn't left, he's just finally completed his foe list.

User avatar
emceng
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: State of Hockey
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby emceng » Wed Aug 11, 2010 2:47 pm UTC

I am currently reading...nothing. Which is weird. There are maybe 6 books that I stopped partway into that I should get back to, but no desire to do so really. I'm trying to figure out what I should read next. What I really should be doing is reading some technical material for work, but that's not happening right now.

My options:

Try and get back to GEB. I like it, but it's a really tough read, and I have a hard time dedicating the time and mental effort, instead of just grabbing a few pages here and there.

Steven Pinker's How the Mind Works. Interesting, but not enough to keep me engaged.

Random other non-fiction I never got back to. Some of it was decent, but again didn't wow me.

Midnight Tides. I've bought up through book 9 now, but only have read through book 4.

Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy - I've heard good things, and I liked his work on the WoT

O'Brien's Master and Commander series. I've gotten up to book 9, and enjoy them, but haven't read one in a year or two

Julian Stockwin's sailing series

Other random sci-fi - Piers Anthony's space emperor series, Farmer's world of tiers or other stuff, a few Heinlein books, a Peter Hamilton book, some Pynchon I couldn't get into, Stand on Zanzibar, I, Cladius, The Mayor of Castorbridge, One Hundred Years of Solitude, some Bester, some Harlan Ellison, A Canticle for Lebowitz, and on and on.
When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up. - CS Lewis

ImagingGeek
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:41 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Wed Aug 11, 2010 3:23 pm UTC

JayDee wrote:
ImagingGeek wrote:The foundation series started with a science-cred problem, and by book 2 had given up all trappings of being vaguely scientific. That was disappointing.
Part of that is science marching on. When it was written it wasn't so far from plausible. I've read comments from Asimov (or Clarke, maybe) about sci-fi with various psychic themes - at the time, they hadn't been so thoroughly falsified.

That makes sense - still bugs me though :wink:

That said, the whole psycohistory thing would have been laughable circa 1850 - it defies the very statistical principals Asimov apparently based psychohistory on.

JayDee wrote: (I loved the first ~four stories, everything up to the introduction of the Mule, personally.) If Foundation doesn't seem like hard sf that's because the goalposts have moved since it was written.
ImagingGeek wrote:Those issues aside, I'm also not overly impressed with the overall story. Hollow characters, unreasonable jumps in the story, deus ex machina as a standard plotline, etc.
Those are all pretty reasonable criticisms. The jumps tend to come from the fact the books are collections of short stories from magazines, printed years apart. Short stories which tend to be idea focused rather than plot or character or setting, etc. So they rise and fall on those ideas. Which are a little dated. Mileage varies on how much that matters to an individual.


I agree that the first books were short stories, and the jumps excusable. But the later books were written as books, and still had the same issues. But it was the general issues - deus ex machina in particular, which are driving me nuts. 2000+ years ago, when the term was invented, it was accepted as a poor story-telling motif. The fact it is so often used in the Foundation series is driving me batty.

Its especially irritating, as Asimov didn't do things like that in his robot books - many of which were also short stories. I had expected better.

Re-reading the above, it seems overly harsh. I'm not saying its bad - just below my expectations based on other Asmiov works I've read, and below what I expected based on the long-lasting hype the series has had.

JayDee wrote:The Ambitions of Curiosity compares the beginnings of science in ancient Greece and China, asking various interesting questions. Fascinating stuff, and recommended to anyone interested in the history of science but who has only ever looked at the branch of history leading back to Egypt / Greece.


Bought it after reading the description over at amazon - thanks for brining it to my attention.

JayDee wrote:Last night I read The Cognitive Style of Powerpoint by Edward Tufte. Solid argument and solid presentation about something that I've vaguely railed against for years. I'm not sure I'm going to be able to easily tolerate many of my lectures this week.


I see we share a pet peeve. I don't know if you've seen this vid, but it touches on the same topic as your book:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d04w4vvByDI

Bryan
I have a new blog, on making beer.

Not that anyone reads it...

User avatar
JayDee
Posts: 3620
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:13 am UTC
Location: Most livable city in the world.
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby JayDee » Wed Aug 11, 2010 11:54 pm UTC

ImagingGeek wrote:That said, the whole psycohistory thing would have been laughable circa 1850 - it defies the very statistical principals Asimov apparently based psychohistory on.
This I am curious about. I was willing to forgive it because I thought it was cool (mortal chessmaster putting into play a plan that unfolds in the thousands of years after he dies? Awesome.) As much as I didn't like Second Foundation (the book or the idea) the scenes set on second foundation with the maths were also pretty cool. I've read other stories from the period, from Heinlein and maybe others, that feature the notion that psychology would become a precise mathematical science. Perhaps it was due to the popularity of psychoanalysis at the time?

ImagingGeek wrote:But the later books were written as books, and still had the same issues.
I think the latter books were something of a cash-in / submission to popular demand. Thirty years passed between the writing of Second Foundation and Foundation's Edge. Haven't read those latter books, though, since I was under the impression they weren't worth it.
The Mighty Thesaurus wrote:I believe that everything can and must be joked about.
Hawknc wrote:I like to think that he hasn't left, he's just finally completed his foe list.

ImagingGeek
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:41 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Thu Aug 12, 2010 12:28 am UTC

JayDee wrote:
ImagingGeek wrote:That said, the whole psycohistory thing would have been laughable circa 1850 - it defies the very statistical principals Asimov apparently based psychohistory on.
This I am curious about. I was willing to forgive it because I thought it was cool (mortal chessmaster putting into play a plan that unfolds in the thousands of years after he dies? Awesome.). . . I've read other stories from the period, from Heinlein and maybe others, that feature the notion that psychology would become a precise mathematical science. Perhaps it was due to the popularity of psychoanalysis at the time?


My problems are two-fold. First, he consistently refutes his claims that individual actions don't matter. Each and every "sheldon crisis" that comes along is precipitated, and solved, by a small number of people. By his own rules, that shouldn't occur.

As for stats, the way he sets up psychohistory runs counter to the way statistics work. His basic premise is that in large enough groups peoples behavior becomes probabalistic. That may or maynot be a realistic expectation, but its irrelevant to my gripe. Where he goes wrong is in the idea that with a large enough population, probabalistic systems become predictive, or near-predictive enough to have a sheldon plan. Stat's don't work that way. Having a larger population size doesn't make the actual probability of an event change, so no matter how big the universe population was, events would remain probabilistic, not predictive.

He also ignores the effect of cumulative probabilities. Any sort of sheldon plan would require that tens of thousands - if not millions or even billions - of events come out the way they were predicted. Any small divergences would rapidly amplify to the point that all predictability would be lost. Lets say you have a series of events with 99.9% probability of occurring. If you have 2 of these events contingent on each other, the chance of both occurring as expected is 99.8%. If you have 50 events contingent on each other, all with a 99.9% chance of occurring, the chance of all 50 occurring is 95%. If you have 100 of said events, the probability of them all occurring is 90%. 500 of said events, the probability drops to 60%. Even assuming a low-ball of 1000 of said events, your cumulative probability of everything going right is only 36%. If there is 1 million events, your probability is a whopping 3 X 10-433%. While a plan based on those events could be kept on track by his "second foundation", formulating a plan where your predictability drops off like this would be impossible, mathematically speaking.

Bryan
I have a new blog, on making beer.

Not that anyone reads it...

User avatar
Psycho Goose
Posts: 173
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 5:41 am UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Psycho Goose » Thu Aug 12, 2010 6:25 am UTC

I recently finished reading Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. It was good. Very good. May be the best thing I've ever read, and I never say that after I finish a book.

No, seriously. Read it now. It's really a series of nested novellas--one takes place in the 1850s, and that stops halfway through to jump to one that takes place in the 1930s, and the main character of the 1930s story reads the journal that the first bit consists of. This continues into the distant future. For the first bit, it was kinda hard going, as the first few stories start out a wee bit slowly, and--frustratingly--break off just as soon as they start to get interesting. But then they pick up, and it's really the ending that matters--I have long believed that a story's ending is its most important part, and Cloud Atlas has six fantastic endings that range from hilariously uplifting to depressingly tragic. I'm not very good at describing books, but I can't think of a person I know who would flat-out dislike this book, and considering the people I know, that's some pretty high praise.

Now reading The Iliad. This is summer reading for school--I have to finish it before I begin my freshman year at college. So far, I think it's very good, but a bit overwhelming. I'm just not used to its poetic, overdescriptive (and a bit dry, but this may be a translation issue) style. The story, however, is picking up a bit--the characters are getting fleshed out, and it's brilliant the way Homer squeezes all sorts of past and future events into the present that he's describing. Oh, and just about everyone is totally fucking badass. A somewhat major (though, as far as I can tell, not too important) character just stabbed Ares. And made him cry.
Mother Superior wrote:Go to Checkov's guns on fifth. But be careful, any gun he shows you is liable to go off at some point while you're in the store.

cv4
Posts: 138
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:32 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby cv4 » Sun Aug 22, 2010 10:36 pm UTC

Just finished A Feast for Crows. Pretty bummed that I am now caught up in the series. WTB Dance with Dragons ASAP.

User avatar
The Milkman
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:19 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby The Milkman » Tue Aug 24, 2010 1:20 am UTC

I started reading Vonnegut. Now I don't want to put him down.

On Breakfast of Champions right now, and I'm gonna save it for my long and upcoming plane trip.
Do you love My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic? Did you wish that you had a place to talk about your love? Then join #xkcd-ponies! You won't be sorry.

Chuff
CHOO CHOO I'M A TRAIN
Posts: 1018
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 8:45 am UTC
Location: The Purple Valley, Mass

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Chuff » Tue Aug 24, 2010 2:21 am UTC

Waverly, by Sir Walter Scott. I'm not sure if it's supposed to be funny, but it definitely is. It's hilarious.
The Great Hippo wrote:The internet's chief exports are cute kittens, porn, and Reasons Why You Are Completely Fucking Wrong.
addams wrote:How human of him. "If, they can do it, then, I can do it." Humans. Pfft. Poor us.

liveeeee_
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 1:38 am UTC
Location: Brasil

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby liveeeee_ » Tue Aug 24, 2010 2:49 am UTC

The last book I read was "The Metamorphosis" by Kafka. It's the third book by Kafka that I read (the first too being "The Castle" and "The Trial"). The three books are very, very similar. I liked them, but I don't know exactly why. I think it's the quality of the narrative, the feeling of despair you get by those ever worsening situations in which the characters are.

I'm looking forward to read "Slaughterhouse Five" now. Or maybe something by Tolstoy.

User avatar
svensen
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Aug 11, 2010 12:38 am UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby svensen » Mon Aug 30, 2010 2:26 pm UTC

The Milkman wrote:I started reading Vonnegut. Now I don't want to put him down.

On Breakfast of Champions right now, and I'm gonna save it for my long and upcoming plane trip.


It's been a while since I've read Vonnegut, but I remember absolutely loving it... Sirens of Titan especially. I'm currently searching for something to read, which sucks. I need to start keeping a reserve pile of "books to get to" so I don't find myself in this situation anymore. But yeah, that's the third or fourth time over the past few weeks that someone's mentioned Cloud Atlas to me...I'm thinking it must be fate.

cv4
Posts: 138
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:32 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby cv4 » Mon Aug 30, 2010 3:55 pm UTC

Just finished Neverwhere by Gaiman. Most likely, going to either Foundation (Asimov) or Xenocide (Card) next.

ImagingGeek
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:41 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:08 pm UTC

Just finished Rendezvous with Rama. Next up: plato's replubic or flatland.
I have a new blog, on making beer.

Not that anyone reads it...

User avatar
Venn
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:35 am UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Venn » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:37 pm UTC

Despair by Nabokov (more inconspicuous to read on public transport than Lolita). I picked it up at a !local bookstore because the publisher (Vintage International) does excellent cover art for classic books. The Dostoyevsky covers were gorgeous, but the books were too fat to carry. :(

I just finished Freakonomics because I was feeling acutely uneducated for not reading Another One of Those Books Everyone Is Supposed to Have Read (But This Time They Actually Did).

User avatar
emceng
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon May 19, 2008 9:38 pm UTC
Location: State of Hockey
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby emceng » Tue Sep 07, 2010 1:50 pm UTC

Venn wrote:Despair by Nabokov (more inconspicuous to read on public transport than Lolita). I picked it up at a !local bookstore because the publisher (Vintage International) does excellent cover art for classic books. The Dostoyevsky covers were gorgeous, but the books were too fat to carry. :(

I just finished Freakonomics because I was feeling acutely uneducated for not reading Another One of Those Books Everyone Is Supposed to Have Read (But This Time They Actually Did).



I found Freakonomics very interesting. I know it is pop psychology/sociology/economics so you need to take some of it with a grain of salt, but it was a fun read. I think it also had more data and actual science behind versus say Malcolm Gladwell's stuff.

Reading The Princess Bride right now. I looked at my list for the year - 32 books. That seems pretty sad, and make me think I will fall significantly short of 50. I would try and read a bunch to work on it, but I am swamped with other things right now.
When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up. - CS Lewis

User avatar
Dave_Wise
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:59 pm UTC
Location: Wales. Explaining much.
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Dave_Wise » Sat Sep 11, 2010 5:47 pm UTC

I'm reading vanity fair by Thackeray. It's kinda sarcastic, but a lot of fun to read.
The future is always bright. Bombs generate quite substantial amounts of illumination
-a friend.

delfts
Posts: 63
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2010 10:43 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby delfts » Sun Sep 12, 2010 1:33 pm UTC

I just finished The Catcher in the Rye and I'm currently reading Ender in Exile.

cv4
Posts: 138
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:32 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby cv4 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:15 pm UTC

Just finished Foundation. Really liked it. Either doing American Gods or Xenocide next I think.

LoganCale
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 7:37 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby LoganCale » Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:27 pm UTC

I'm reading a bunch of books at once currently, though primarily The Pope's Rhinoceros by Lawrence Norfolk, along with Bad Art by Eric Gideon, We The Living by Ayn Rand and The Mongoliad by Neal Stephenson, Greg Bear, etc. I've also got many other books queued up on my Kindle and a giant box of assorted hardcover books I bought used for $5.

User avatar
Dave_Wise
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:59 pm UTC
Location: Wales. Explaining much.
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Dave_Wise » Sun Sep 19, 2010 9:47 pm UTC

The human stain by Philip Roth. It's brilliant! You feel kind of dirty reading it, but at the same time it's unputdownable.
The future is always bright. Bombs generate quite substantial amounts of illumination
-a friend.

User avatar
blu
Posts: 144
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 6:48 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby blu » Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:50 pm UTC

It's been a while since I'd read a new book so I went to a close book store and bought a couple at random.

One was The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, which was an OK book, but the English translation wasn't very good and the
characters and their actions were dubios at times. I don't think I'll give it a second read.

Second is Gardens of the Moon. I am currently at the end of the Darujhistan section.
This book is obtuse at times and it took me a while to get into it. That being said, it's getting better as I read.

Zohar wrote:I started reading a book in Hebrew called (translated) "Frost", it's some weird suspense book that occurs 500 years in the future in Tel Aviv. It's weird...
Is this worth a read? I don't usually bother with local books (too expensive, among other reasons). Last one I read was A Week in the Life, 2 years ago or so.

User avatar
vector
Posts: 113
Joined: Fri Feb 06, 2009 3:58 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby vector » Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:49 am UTC

Just finished Bridget Jones's Diary, which reads like a modern-day, comedic Pride and Prejudice (for good reason, too). Definitely recommend: it's one of the few "chick novels" in which I actually found myself rooting for the heroine's romances (others are Special Topics in Calamity Physics and The Princess Bride).
Come visit the Bay12 Mafia subforum: http://www.bay12forums.com/smf/index.php?board=20.0

delfts
Posts: 63
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2010 10:43 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby delfts » Sun Sep 26, 2010 7:54 pm UTC

I'm currently reading Foundation. I'm almost done with it (about 50 pages left to go), and it's pretty good, but a lot of ideas and events are discussed very quickly, so it's a bit confusing... Perhaps I need to re-read it in a couple of years.
My blog about a bunch of random ideas, which are pretty darn interesting.

User avatar
JayDee
Posts: 3620
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2007 3:13 am UTC
Location: Most livable city in the world.
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby JayDee » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:55 am UTC

delfts wrote:I'm currently reading Foundation. I'm almost done with it (about 50 pages left to go), and it's pretty good, but a lot of ideas and events are discussed very quickly, so it's a bit confusing.
Asimov's Foundation? It might be worth knowing that those were short stories written for magazines in an age when that was the thing. It's one explanation of the quickness, at least.
The Mighty Thesaurus wrote:I believe that everything can and must be joked about.
Hawknc wrote:I like to think that he hasn't left, he's just finally completed his foe list.

User avatar
theGoldenCalf;
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:16 am UTC
Location: Elbow deep inside the borderline

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby theGoldenCalf; » Sun Oct 03, 2010 1:51 pm UTC

Just finished "The Road" by Cormack McCarthy. Rough experience. It is a brilliant book, but a very depressing, bleak read, full of cruelty, cannibalism, despair, fear, grotesque death and other such stuff that make for a super-fun-tuesday. It gave me fucking nightmares. Nothing gives me nightmares, and that includes Palahniuk.

Started reading Michael Chabon's "The Yiddish Policemen's Union", so far it's a delight.
それは彼女が言ったことだ!

User avatar
KingSkin
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:04 am UTC
Location: England

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby KingSkin » Mon Oct 04, 2010 9:19 pm UTC

The Road is a brilliant book but also horrifically depressing. I read it when my son was about 3 months old and some parts really did get to me. Very well written though. It didn't give me nightmares but did leave me thinking about it constantly during the day. I'm not sure why Pahalniuk's stuff would give anyone nightmares though, it seems to be written with the point of view of shocking you which immediately makes it less shocking. Neuropath by Scott Bakker is far more horrible and more likely to give you nightmares (or at least sleepless nights), especially if you've got kids.

I haven't read Yiddish Policeman's Union but I highly reccommend Chabon's Gentlemen of the Road which is a great little adventure story which he originally wanted to call 'Jews With Swords'.

I'm reading The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson which is a lot more interesting than I thought it was going to be. Very light reading but his descriptions of burn treatments are very interesting.
After that I'm thinking about re-reading Dhalgren by Samuel Delaney because (for all it's faults) it's one of the wost beautifully written books I've ever read and certainly one of my favourites.

User avatar
theGoldenCalf;
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:16 am UTC
Location: Elbow deep inside the borderline

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby theGoldenCalf; » Tue Oct 05, 2010 7:47 am UTC

Well, 'Guts' haunted me for quite some time. I ate very little the following few days, had phantom stomach aches, had to shake disturbing images out of my head pretty often, but slept like a rock.
それは彼女が言ったことだ!

ImagingGeek
Posts: 380
Joined: Fri Aug 06, 2010 6:41 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:01 pm UTC

Just finished Ringworld and The Republic, mid-way through Man in the Iron Mask. Read them all before, but they're favs of mine that I read every 3 or 4 years.

Not sure what's next - I've got neuromancer and the entire wheel of time series loaded up on my ebook reader. Question is, do I want to blow through neuromancer first, or get started on the 10,000 pages (or so ) of the WOT series?

Choices, too many choices.

Bryan
I have a new blog, on making beer.

Not that anyone reads it...

User avatar
minesweeper
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:37 pm UTC

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby minesweeper » Sun Oct 10, 2010 12:42 pm UTC

Currently reading Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and a couple of DSP textbooks.
"Goldeneye has a better control method than any other game in history. And not just video games. The control method's better than cards." - from the old Edge Forums (bastardised)

"you know what's odd? fifteen." - found on Everything2

paravatar
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 8:12 am UTC
Location: Ulm, Germany

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby paravatar » Tue Oct 12, 2010 8:50 pm UTC

Just finished with "The Quiet War" by McAuley; liked it very much, hard SF with speculative biology. Continuing with the sequel "The gardens of the Sun".
In parallel Mort (Pratchett), Visual Explanations (Tufte), Dune, A World without End and some more.
Re-reading Ringworld, and QED
And the stuff for work…
…is listening to the swooshing sound of deadlines passing by

User avatar
MotorToad
Really Repeatedly Redundantly Redundant
Posts: 1114
Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2007 10:09 pm UTC
Location: Saint Joseph, CA
Contact:

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby MotorToad » Thu Oct 14, 2010 6:17 pm UTC

Just finished reading (erm, listening to) Nation by Pratchett. I didn't know when I got it that it was "young adult," but it might just be my favorite book since Letters from the Earth for provoking thought and absolving doubt.

Presently about 2/3 through Unseen Academicals which common opinion had caused me to expect little of, but I'm enjoying it a lot.
What did you bring the book I didn't want read out of up for?
"MAN YOUR WAY TO ANAL!" (An actual quote from another forum. Only four small errors from making sense.)

User avatar
charliepanayi
Posts: 1531
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 7:26 pm UTC
Location: London, UK

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby charliepanayi » Thu Oct 14, 2010 6:43 pm UTC

I'm reading The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen, which I am enjoying despite the fact pretty much every character in it is a complete ass.
"Excuse me Miss, do you like pineapple?"

"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work, I want to achieve it through not dying"

User avatar
ian
Posts: 706
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 3:55 pm UTC
Location: Sealand

Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ian » Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:01 am UTC

MotorToad wrote:Just finished reading (erm, listening to) Nation by Pratchett. I didn't know when I got it that it was "young adult," but it might just be my favorite book since Letters from the Earth for provoking thought and absolving doubt.

Presently about 2/3 through Unseen Academicals which common opinion had caused me to expect little of, but I'm enjoying it a lot.

I'm waiting for my housemate to finish up Nation so I can read it. I've been waiting a while.

Reading 'all you need is KILL' atm. It's pretty good. Though the last few fiction books I read before it were classics so the lower quality of writing, which is by no means bad, can be a bit obvious at times.


Return to “Books”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests