What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

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ImagingGeek
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ImagingGeek » Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:09 pm UTC

ahammel wrote:
rmsgrey wrote:It's a sociological essay disguised in an adventure story.
Well, yeah, but just because you're wrapping your story around a sociology essay, it doesn't give you license to write a bad story.

Many of Heinlein's novels fall into the same trap. I agree - its too bad that so many cool stories get ruined by excessive editorialization. Starship Troopers (if you've seen the movie, then you have no idea what the book is about) is one of my favourites by Heinlein, but it too gets preachy from time-to-time.

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Not that anyone reads it...

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby rmsgrey » Wed Feb 27, 2013 10:54 am UTC

ImagingGeek wrote:
ahammel wrote:
rmsgrey wrote:It's a sociological essay disguised in an adventure story.
Well, yeah, but just because you're wrapping your story around a sociology essay, it doesn't give you license to write a bad story.

Many of Heinlein's novels fall into the same trap. I agree - its too bad that so many cool stories get ruined by excessive editorialization. Starship Troopers (if you've seen the movie, then you have no idea what the book is about) is one of my favourites by Heinlein, but it too gets preachy from time-to-time.

Bryan

Amen - Starship Troopers is founded on the ideas that the franchise should only be given to those willing to earn it through some form of voluntary national service, and that the biggest problem with modern militaries is that there are too many noncombatants in the organisation, and there are detailed lectures on those points amongst the battles and other events that illustrate them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:14 am UTC

http://booklens.com/paul-bloom/descartes-baby

Descartes Baby

I am rereading it on the computer. I wanted the last page.
How does it end? I forgot.
Spoiler:
What is the last line?

When I knew I was leaving my books and would never see them, again;
I read the last line of many. Sometimes it turned into the last page.

I had a few books to go through.
Descartes Baby was loaned to me.

I gave the book back and we talked about it.
We attended a meeting together.

The meeting was like a class.
We were doing continuing ed.

She a judge. Me a nurse with a little guest house.
Of course, she outranked me, in every way.

One time she lost patience with me.
We were talking about Physics.

I think the argument ended with The Fact.
"Neither one of us is qualified to answer that question."

I liked to think that I "knew'.
Just, 'knew'. She hated that.

I can see her point.
The World was coming apart at the seams and I was doing my level best to be calm.
To at least appear calm.

What are you so Calm about?!
Inside or outside? What are you so calm about?

I have not seen her in years.
What would we have to talk about?
Nothing? I know about the internet, now.

We could look something up.
I read ''Age of Reason'' by Thomas Paine, because of her.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Age_of_Reason
Because, she could not, really, talk to anyone who had not read it.

Reading the book Age of Reason is easier than reading the Wikipedia article.
The book is not as long.

My favorite part of the book was in the article!
I believe in the equality of man; and I believe that religious duties consist in doing justice, loving mercy, and endeavouring to make our fellow-creatures happy.


That is more than enough from me.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby cplns » Mon Apr 08, 2013 11:38 pm UTC

I'm just starting Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman, after devouring American Gods in a matter of three days. It takes a lot for me to expend that kind of attention on a book, so I'm excited.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby rmsgrey » Tue Apr 09, 2013 9:37 am UTC

Kindle: Les Miserables
Dead-tree: A Blink of the Screen

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Puppyclaws » Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:12 pm UTC

Currently reading Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas. Or, trying to. I am a little disappointed in it so far, having read and loved both Still Life with Woodpecker and Jitterbug Perfume. I was told that this was among Robbins' best, but...eh. Maybe it gets better. And I at least appreciate the effort of trying to write a book in the second person.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Fri Apr 26, 2013 5:01 pm UTC

Puppyclaws wrote:Currently reading Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas. Or, trying to. I am a little disappointed in it so far, having read and loved both Still Life with Woodpecker and Jitterbug Perfume. I was told that this was among Robbins' best, but...eh. Maybe it gets better. And I at least appreciate the effort of trying to write a book in the second person.

Those were some weird Books.
Fun and fanciful, sort of.

Still Life may be worth a reread.
Honey; Why wade through a Book you do not enjoy?

I did that with 'A Prayer for Owen Mennie'.
Because it had What's His Name's name on it, I read Every Word.
It was worse than a Textbook, by A Bunch.

When I met a person who's favorite book is A Prayer for Owen Meanie.
I did not want to hear their side of The Story. I was still angry.

That was a long book. It never got Off The Ground for me.
I forget what it was about. A lot of Prepwork for What?

Was it a Midlife Crisis Book?

I came to This Thread because of a Book.
I don't know whether I will read it or not.

It sure Produced a Beautiful peice of Art Work.
The book is Old. 1951. A Long time ago.

The paper has Yellowed and become Brittle.
Science and Religion in Accord.
The New Psychology

It was New in 1951? What is that now?
The Old Psychology?

I picked up The Book. The jacket is falling apart.
I ended up with The Back of The Jacket in My Hand.

It is So Beautiful. It stands alone.
Read The Book? Why?
The internet has Modern Real Psychology.

The Art and Science of Psychology are Complete. Right?
No work to be done There.

On the shelf and ready for prosperity, who I hear is nosey,
to check on it, Someday.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Puppyclaws » Fri Apr 26, 2013 9:14 pm UTC

addams wrote:Those were some weird Books.
Fun and fanciful, sort of.

Still Life may be worth a reread.
Honey; Why wade through a Book you do not enjoy?

I did that with 'A Prayer for Owen Mennie'.
Because it had What's His Name's name on it, I read Every Word.
It was worse than a Textbook, by A Bunch.

When I met a person who's favorite book is A Prayer for Owen Meanie.
I did not want to hear their side of The Story. I was still angry.


I like them for their fantastical qualities; they are not quite sci-fi, but not quite real; speculative fiction, the best thing really.

A lot of my favorite books, are books I give up on after the first 40 pages or so, and then come back to later and find they are great (The Sound and the Fury, for one). So, I tend to slog a bit more than I did when I was younger.

When other people love things I hate, I usually launch into tirades about the objective nature of taste. I am not very popular sometimes, but it feels good.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Mon Apr 29, 2013 4:07 am UTC

The Medusa and the Snail,
by Lewis Thomas

Weird and Wonderful.
Some dense sentences in the first chaper.
Weird; Very Weird.

Spoiler:
I Like It!
The man seems to have an optimimistc long view.
I also think he is funny. He writes, "Uniquiness is so common place a property of living things there is really nothing at all unique about it."

That is funny stuff.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Guu
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Guu » Fri May 24, 2013 8:48 pm UTC

K-PAX by Gene Brewer
I really like it, it's funny and well written... there was also a film about it with Kevin Spacey :)

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Thu Jun 27, 2013 3:36 pm UTC

The Steinbeck book 'Cannery Row' was made into a Move.

Cannery Row may be the only Book that The Movie is Better.
The Young Nick Noltie. It is in Black and White?

So funny. Watching a Movie like that is Like reading in Old English.
How could people stand to watch Black and White?

Stienbeck's books were depressing. oh. They tended to be about The Depression. (shrug.)
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby cplns » Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:18 am UTC

Still working on Anansi Boys (I lost a few weeks to a complete lack of concentration), and also listening to the audiobook of John Dies at the End by David Wong.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby teenidle » Tue Jul 16, 2013 9:41 pm UTC

I've just finished reading Lolita and I think there was exactly one reference in the whole book that I got. Something about the Erlkönig. Sure, I suspected something was up with "Edgar H. Humbert" and some other stuff (Carmen?), but whatever. And notes which are at the end of the book are considerably harder to check in case of ebooks, so I also missed the French phrases. (again, exactly one thing I understood: billet doux).

Also I've read The Alchemist recently. I feel like I somehow missed the point. Like, there was no point. But then again, I'm not a person with hopes and dreams, so.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Sebastiaan » Thu Jul 25, 2013 10:02 am UTC

Things and books I've been reading lately:

* I'm rereading Steven Erikson's Memories of Ice, the third volume of The Malazan Book of the Fallen.

* I've just finished Why Does the World Exist? by Jim Holt.

* I've picked up Connectionism and the Mind by Bechtel and Abrahamsen again.

* I'm at three-quarters of Neil Stephenson's Cryptonomicon

* Refreshing my knowledge with the second edition of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Huettel, Song, & McCarthy, 2008)

Most of the reading time is devoted to scientific literature, though.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Plasma Man » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:27 pm UTC

^ Thanks for reminding me that I've been intending to read more Neil Stephenson.

I'm currently reading the Tactics of Mistake, the first in the Dorsai trilogy by Gordon Dickinson. I haven't read them before, and I'm quite enjoying it so far. The scheming is complicated enough to be interesting, without being so complex it becomes confusing.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Felstaff » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:30 pm UTC

I recently finished The Quarry, Iain Banks' untimely posthumous final book. It was alright, but needed a lot more tightening up; the time constraints really shewed through. The characters, particularly their dialogue, were more like a homogenous blob, rather than individuals. Nobody spoke differently from each other. The protagonist's social retardation, OCD, and Asperger's-like behaviour was too fluid and changing to be believable. I much prefer the characterisation of the kid in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime which was far more affecting and sympathetic, which is why that is a heartbreaking story and this one I could care less about (but only a little). It's a gentle, throwaway story with a lot of swearing and cancer.

Before that I finished the Casual Vacancy. The ending of which spoiled the story that preceded it. It was unrelenting in its demonisation of the middle class and treating the working/criminal classes as noble savages. None of the characters had any redeeming qualities whatsoever.

Now I'm re-reading Paul Auster's New York Trilogy, 'cause I didn't finish it last time and I saw it at the liberry the day before. I completely forgot the content of City of Glass and Ghosts, so flicked through them and am now reading the third story I didn't finish last time.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby jestingrabbit » Sun Aug 11, 2013 3:50 am UTC

Felstaff wrote:Before that I finished the Casual Vacancy. The ending of which spoiled the story that preceded it. It was unrelenting in its demonisation of the middle class and treating the working/criminal classes as noble savages. None of the characters had any redeeming qualities whatsoever.


What about the rich folk?

I'm currently reading Joanna Russ' "the female man". Its very strongly feminist, and a little bit scifi. And good. Though I was expecting more scifi and less feminism, it really works.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Sun Aug 25, 2013 4:53 am UTC

The World Without Us, by Alan Weisman

The way the author writes about water makes sense to me.
Water is a powerfully destructive force.

This book is about how and how fast man made creation would fall apart without The Creators constant intervention.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ahammel » Tue Aug 27, 2013 6:38 pm UTC

Sunshine, Robin McKinley
The Stress of Her Regard, Tim Powers

Traditional vampires vs. weird vampire/nephilim/lamia/gorgon things that are made out of rocks and fight Percy Shelley and Lord Byron.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Djehutynakht » Thu Sep 19, 2013 7:07 am UTC

Simultaneously, for education, Machiavelli's The Prince and Aristotle's The Nichomachean Ethics.


I think reading them both at once approaches the literary analogy of a matter-antimatter annihilation.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby aldonius » Sun Sep 22, 2013 11:44 am UTC

Plasma Man wrote:I'm currently reading the Tactics of Mistake, the first in the Dorsai trilogy by Gordon Dickinson. I haven't read them before, and I'm quite enjoying it so far. The scheming is complicated enough to be interesting, without being so complex it becomes confusing.


Sheesh, I haven't read anything in that universe for years now! Thanks for reminding me.

NinjaEdit: Whilst not readioactive right now, I have been working my way through the first couple of 1632 ebooks.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ahammel » Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:08 am UTC

Shaman, Kim Stanley Robinson's new book.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Mon Oct 21, 2013 9:11 am UTC

An Amerian Literature Textbook.
It was good. Each one is a little different.

Justice Jackson's statement is in this one.
I had never read it before.

Jackson's statement is inside the spoiler, if you want to know what he said.
oh. He may have been the last self educated attorney that was taken seriously.

Spoiler:
Statement by Justice Jackson on War Trials Agreement; August 12, 1945
There are some things I would like to say, particularly to the American people, about the agreement we have just signed.

For the first time, four of the most powerful nations have agreed not only upon the principles of liability for war crimes of persecution, but also upon the principle of individual responsibility for the crime of attacking the international peace.

Repeatedly, nations have united in abstract declarations that the launching of aggressive war is illegal. They have condemned it by treaty. But now we have the concrete application of these abstractions in a way which ought to make clear to the world that those who lead their nations into aggressive war face individual accountability for such acts.

The definitions under which we will try the Germans are general definitions. They impose liability upon war-making statesmen of all countries alike. If we can cultivate in the world the idea that aggressive war-making is the way to the prisoner's dock rather than the way to honors, we will have accomplished something toward making the peace more secure.

This, too, is the first time that four nations with such different legal systems have tried to knit their ideas of just criminal procedure into a cooperative trial. That task is far more difficult than those unfamiliar with the differences between continental and Anglo-American methods would expect. It has involved frank and critical examination by the representatives of each country of the other's methods of administering justice. Our discussions have been candid and open-minded.

The representatives of the United Kingdom have been headed by the Lord Chancellor and the Attorney General. The Soviet Republic has been represented by the Vice President of its Supreme Court and by one of the leading scholars of Soviet jurisprudence. The Provisional Government of France has sent a judge of its highest court and a professor most competent in its jurisprudence.

It would not be a happy forecast for the future harmony of the world if I could not agree with such representatives of the world's leading systems of administering justice on a common procedure for trial of war criminals.

Of course, one price of such international cooperation is mutual concession. Much to which American lawyers would be accustomed is missing in this instrument. I have not seen fit to insist that these prisoners have the benefit of all of the protections which our legal and constitutional system throws around defendants.

To the Russian and French jurist, our system seems unduly tender of defendants and to be loaded in favor of delay and in favor of the individual against the state. To us, their system seems summary and to load the procedure in favor of the state against the individual.

However, the continental system is the one the Germans themselves have employed and understand. It does not seem inappropriate that a special military commission for the trial of Europeans in Europe, for crimes committed in Europe, should follow rather largely although not entirely the European procedures. The essentials of a fair trial have been assured.

Another price of international cooperation is slow motion. No doubt Russia acting alone, or the United States, or any one country acting alone, could try these defendants in much shorter time than we can do it when we consult with each other and move along together. Our associates, for example, have a claim as good as ours to have the trial proceed in a language which they understand.

This requires a trial rendered into four languages-German, Russian, French, and English. This will be a dreary business, and there is no use trying to dodge that fact. It is a tedious prospect for me and for representatives of all the governments which will engage in it.

But I do not think the world will be poorer even if it takes a month or so, more or less, to try these men who now are prisoners and whose capacity for harm already has been overcome.

I do think the world would be infinitely poorer if we were to confess that the nations which now dominate the western world hold ideas of justice so irreconcilable that no common procedure could be devised or carried out.

The danger, so far as the moral judgment of the world is concerned, which will beset these trials is that they come to be regarded as merely political trials in which the victor wreaks vengeance upon the vanquished. However unfortunate it may be, there seems no way of doing anything about the crimes against the peace and against humanity except that the victors judge the vanquished.

Experience has taught that we can hardly expect them to try each other. The scale of their attack leaves no neutrals in the world. We must summon all that we have of dispassionate judgment to the task of patiently and fairly presenting the record of these evil deeds in these trials.

We must make clear to the Germans that the wrong for which their fallen leaders are on trial is not that they lost the war, but that they started it. And we must not allow ourselves to be drawn into a trial of the causes of the war, for our position is that no grievances or policies will justify resort to aggressive war. It is utterly renounced and condemned as an instrument of policy.

I therefore want to make clear to the American people that we have taken an important step forward in this instrument in fixing individual responsibility of war-mongering, among whatever peoples, as an international crime. We have taken another in recognizing an international accountability for persecutions, exterminations, and crimes against humanity when associated with attacks on the peace of the international order.

But I want to be equally clear that to make these advances fully effective through international trials is a task of difficulty and one which will require some public patience and some understanding of the wide gulf which separates the judicial systems of the nations which are trying to cooperate in the effort.

Source:
United States Department of State Bulletin.
August 12, 1945
Washington, DC : Government Printing Office, 1945.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby emceng » Mon Oct 21, 2013 1:21 pm UTC

Bleh. So bought...7 new books last night? Which isn't bad, but when I put them in my list of purchased books for the year, the list was around cell 90. Didn't buy 90 books, but guessing I'm at 50-60. And I've read 26 books on the year(counting HP1-7 as one), and few of those were new purchases. I need to stop buying books, and read what I've got.

Currently trying to finish something like 92 secrets of meeting people, or something like that. Basically a quick guide on social cues and ways to improve how people perceive you. About 60-70% of the ideas are good, some mediocre. Author definitely shows her age though.

Also started flipping through Body for Life. I'm not going on a 12 week program, but I'm hoping it will help motivate me to do better at working out and maintaining a healthy diet.

Then also trying to finish Prometheans in the Lab. Interesting mini-bios of chemists that changed the world - inventors of soap, clothing dyes, leaded gas, CFCs, etc. A little light on the science and chem, but still interesting.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Paul in Saudi » Mon Oct 28, 2013 2:31 am UTC

Edison's Conquest of Mars (1898) Which is a remarkable book however you approach it.

The Man from Snowy River (1890, I think) which oddly I had never read before. I am memorizing it.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby no-genius » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:52 pm UTC

Felstaff wrote:Hee, it's a good book, but it is so achingly quaint and woolly middle-aged-middle-class ('quintessentially British'), I was a little disappointed after the wonderful heartbreaking work of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

I got a couple of chapters into that but I was too annoyed to finish it. Pretty much only started it because I kept getting asked at university interviews if I'd read it.

Currently reading Fearsum Enjinn by Iain M. Banks, and The Shadow Out Of Time by HP Lovecraft (from the Necronomicon collection - just finished At The Mountains Of Madness, and The Shadow Over Innsmouth)
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby SnoringFrog » Fri Nov 01, 2013 8:21 am UTC

Recently finished up Jack London's The Sea Wolf, which reminded me of how much I love London's work and how much I love books set on old ships (like Captains Courageous).

Now I've started on the 11th book in the Wheel of Time series, Knife of Dreams.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Suzaku » Sat Nov 02, 2013 3:58 am UTC

A Princess of Mars, the first of the Barsoom novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs. 'Tis good stuff.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Djehutynakht » Thu Nov 07, 2013 8:27 am UTC

Both Academically:

The Education of Cyrus by Xenophon. Fascinating tale of how one of the world's first empire builders rose from a boy in Persia to somehow conquer much of his known world. Not entirely factual, but then again, what was?

The Bible by ...? I've read the Books of Samuel at another time, but right now starting back at Genesis.

It's actually a fascinating read. But it's kind of weird honestly. I dunno, reading it has given me much respect, if not absolute and everdevoted faith, to the book itself.

But very interesting in any case.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Suzaku » Fri Nov 15, 2013 1:01 pm UTC

The Complete Sherlock Holmes

I've tried to read Sherlock before, but never really got into it. The collection I just bought (Kindle) has everything in the order of original publication starting with the first two novels. It's been much easier starting from there, for some reason, and I'm really enjoying it this time.

I was surprised how closely the first BBC Sherlock episode (A Study in Pink) followed the first novel (A Study in Scarlet).
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby ahammel » Fri Nov 15, 2013 3:14 pm UTC

Moffat and Gatiss are huge Holmes nerds. I'm sure you'll be picking up a new inside joke every few pages.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Fri Nov 15, 2013 4:22 pm UTC

ahammel wrote:Moffat and Gatiss are huge Holmes nerds. I'm sure you'll be picking up a new inside joke every few pages.

Something wrong with a person that can't stop talking.
What ever that is. I have it.

Thank the Gods of the Internet you don't have to open the Spoiler.
Spoiler:
ech. Who done its'.
I don't like to read 'who done its'.

It is not that I do not have respect for the art form. Well?...maybe.
I love books. I love to hear other people's stories.

Other people's real stories and who done its' are a lot alike.
In my deep dark memory, I seem to remember having friends.

People told me stuff. Talking to me was like talking to The Dog.
Dogs listen, Dogs don't care, much.

Every once in a while, I would have to look at someone and ask,
"Did this really happen, to you?"

Sometimes I got the answer, "Yes."
"Who Done it?"

Sometimes, what people told me is not legal to print.
It should not be legal to print that shit.
Most people will not think of that weird shit on their own.

!The World Needs Mods!

Sometimes I got the answer, "No."
"This is from the Movie, 'xxx,xx,X,xx,xxx'
Didn't you see it?"

Then I get The Movie! Kind of fun.
Have you ever had anyone tell you a Movie?

Sometimes I got the answer, "No. It's a book."
If that person liked Who done its
and had not finished the book. Well....

"It's a Book! Look in the back for the answers"
Wrong thing to say to one of Those guys.

Who done its? History Channel in paperback form?
***

If the speaker has read the who done it all the way through
and is satified with that;

They often express surprise, that I would want to Jump to the end.
Some saw it as a critisam of their story telling style.

Sometimes the fiction is so stupid.
Then in the retelling some Idiot thinks I should Care Deeply
about some third guys Made Up People.

Those who done its cause me Reality Shift Problems.
Who gives a flying fuck who did it? Is that the point?

In some of those old books, it is not who done it, but with such style and grace it was described?
Sherlock Homes. Such a strong meme.

A man and his best friend, lover and secretary all rolled into one, walk though the dark fog softened streets of London.
In fuckall-before the birth of the Internet. Dr. Watson? Was his lover named Dr. Watson?

Dr. Watson was a character. right?
I don't read who done its

Sometimes I like being told a who done it.
It is nice to have a friend, when it is dark and foggy.

Dark and foggy in London is not the same today as it was when the Author of Sherlock Holmes slunk through the city streets.
How Terrifying would London=Any Big City be, without electricity? Now, add Fog! Who did it? The Weather Gods!
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We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
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Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Quercus » Sun Nov 17, 2013 4:53 pm UTC

I'm reading On the Steel Breeze, the latest Alastair Reynolds space opera, and it is most excellent. The nice thing with Reynolds is that he doesn't use FTL travel or instantaneous communications in his books at all.
Spoiler:
(well, in the Revelation Space series there is FTL, but it's a very bad idea to use it very much in the interests of not, say, destroying the universe)
This leads to interesting situations - his books can be simultaneously future histories and tight action novels (okay, well maybe not very tight - but I'm a guy who thinks sprawling is good in a book - Moby Dick or The Baroque Cycle anyone?), because they might encompass thousands of years of planetary time, but only a few years of subjective time. This latest book has communications between some of the key characters delayed by 20 years or so by distance, which actually gives a lovely flow to the writing (all the "boring bits" of the protagonists' lives are skipped without the skipping seeming arbitrary).

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby poxic » Fri Nov 22, 2013 9:07 pm UTC

Chris Hadfield's An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth. A good read, full of details about what it's like to be an astronaut (spoiler: it's a master crapload of hard work and very little actual being-in-space).

Also talks about lessons learned through the process, and how it can apply to non-astronauts. One example: the power of negative thinking. Trying to imagine every bad thing that could possibly happen, then figuring out how you would best deal with it if it does, goes a long long way toward increasing calmness and competence whether bad things happen or not.

Short quote, about sitting in the cockpit waiting for launch and wondering whether it will be scrubbed (for weather or other reasons): "But as every second passes, the odds improve that we're going to space today." No indication whether that's an xkcd reference. :wink:
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Citric » Mon Nov 25, 2013 8:09 pm UTC

I'n now reading a book about coyotes called "The Coyote: The Defiant Songdog of the West." It was written by Francois Leydet. It's not just about coyotes themselves but also their interrelationship with mankind over the ages-- from their status as deity / culture hero in several Native American cultures to the large-scale mostly unsuccessful extermination campaign waged against them by US modern wildlife control... it's a very good book and I recommend it to all of you. :!:

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Suzaku » Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:21 am UTC

Rereading Bill Bryson's 'A Short History of Nearly Everything', 'cause I just got the illustrated edition for my Kindle.

This has to be one of my favourite nonfiction books ever, I think. I just love his imagery and turn of phrase.
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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby addams » Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:54 am UTC

Suzaku wrote:Rereading Bill Bryson's 'A Short History of Nearly Everything', 'cause I just got the illustrated edition for my Kindle.

This has to be one of my favourite nonfiction books ever, I think. I just love his imagery and turn of phrase.

Thank you.
I am enjoying it.

It's funny.
The following is from the book.

Perhaps nothing better typifies the strange and often accidental nature of chemical science in its early days than a discovery made by a German named Hennig Brand in 1675. Brand became convinced that gold could somehow be distilled from human urine. (The similarity of color seems to have been a factor in his conclusion.) He assembled fifty buckets of human urine, which he kept for months in his cellar. By various recondite processes, he converted the urine first into a noxious paste and then into a translucent waxy substance. None of it yielded gold, of course, but a strange and interesting thing did happen. After a time, the substance began to glow. Moreover, when exposed to air, it often spontaneously burst into flame.

http://cdn.preterhuman.net/texts/histor ... ything.pdf

It IS funny.
In 1781 Herschel became the first person in the modern era to discover a planet. He wanted to call it George, after the British monarch, but was overruled. Instead it became Uranus.

George?

He was brilliant.
He knew.

I like your book.
Spoiler:
As is often the way in science, the principle had actually been anticipated three years previously by an amateur chemist in England named John Newlands. He suggested that when elements were arranged by weight they appeared to repeat certain properties—in a sense to harmonize—at every eighth place along the scale.


I have heard people argue that the Universe is set up in a scale of 8's.
There is some kind of Music that is read in 8's.

They say it is more than coincidence.
I have no idea.

I have neither the Chemistry background nor the Music background to make that call.
I do like some of the Music. They say it is the Music of the Spheres.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_signature
I can not find a good example of 4/4 time.(shrug)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=on1DDSLdDOo
3/4 time is nice, I suppose.

(The Rock and Roll of its time.)

This machine is amazing.
It is a library in an my lap.
A library and so much more.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Apparently Anonymous » Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:08 am UTC

La mala hora (en: "In Evil Hour") by Gabriel García Márquez.
I'm not really enjoying it that much, but it's good for my Spanish.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby Djehutynakht » Fri Apr 25, 2014 11:09 am UTC

I've never read La Mala Hora or any of Garcia Marquez's works in Spanish for that matter, but what I have read in English (Hundred Years of Solitude and part of Autumn of the Patriarch) were both amazing pieces of work.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez just died several days ago actually... I'm very saddened.
____________

I just finished reading Thirteen Days, Robert F. Kennedy's account of dealing with the Cuban Missile Crisis.

It was a pretty short read but very informative. There was a lot he talked about with regards to decision-making and dealing with other countries through understanding their point of view that I thought was very insightful. If he's accurate, it was great governing that apparently stopped us from killing ourselves.

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Re: What are you readioactive now(and other book related stu

Postby EMTP » Mon Jun 09, 2014 2:55 am UTC

Digging into Russell's History of Western Philosophy.
"Reasonable – that is, human – men will always be capable of compromise, but men who have dehumanized themselves by becoming the blind worshipers of an idea or an ideal are fanatics whose devotion to abstractions makes them the enemies of life."
-- Alan Watts, "The Way of Zen"


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