Your Own Contribution to the English Language

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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby RebeccaRGB » Sun Feb 26, 2012 1:40 am UTC

Eugo wrote:Maybe I did invent some words, can't remember - but what I have somewhere in a file is this list of twisted, misconnected or otherwise mangled sayings.

2nd class struggle
a completely different kettle of worms
let whoever lives in a glass house cast the first stone
benefit of the shade of the doubt
our story takes place and time at...
life or death insurance
let's call it an afternoon
let's try and/or get it done by tomorrow
for the very first time after time and again.
observation makes you see things
he doesn't take no for an answer - he takes it for a walk/for a while/for a fool/to a dinner.
it only goes to show, but then can't find its way back
then the paramilitary band played a polka.
she shortchanged. into a miniskirt.
I'm a time warner. I warn when it's time.

Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddler on a hot tin roof?
Stephen Hawking: Great. The entire universe was destroyed.
Fry: Destroyed? Then where are we now?
Al Gore: I don't know. But I can darn well tell you where we're not—the universe!
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby O Choco » Sat Oct 12, 2013 6:03 am UTC

Flustrated adj. - so frustrated as to be flustered.
http://prosepage.com
MODEST MOUSE wrote:Oh, and we carried it all so well
As if we got a new position
Oh, and we owned all the tools ourselves
But not the skills to make a shelf with
Oh, what useless tools ourselves.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Envelope Generator » Sat Oct 12, 2013 4:05 pm UTC

Incomprehencyclopedia was born in a wits'-end attempt to pin down why I couldn't finish either Ulysses or Pound's Cantos. I can't remember which. It fits both anyway.
cjm wrote:The panel where only the cellphones drop to the ground is the clearest indication yet that everyone in XKCD is in fact naked.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Copper Bezel » Sun Oct 13, 2013 8:28 pm UTC

Katifer Dragonite wrote:My friend said this by accident once (she didn't even realise that it's not a real word), but it has now become integrated into our dialogue.
melge: v. To combine two words with the same or similar meanings to create a portmanteau with the same or similar meaning.
or n. A word created by melging.
The best thing about it is that melge is itself a melge. Another example (said by the same friend a few days later) would be cram-packed, a melge of jam-packed and crammed.

I like these, words that use phonosemantic matching to make sense despite not being real words. I've used whick by the same means, though I've just found that it's also a variation of quick. Grr.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Znirk » Mon Oct 14, 2013 11:53 am UTC

Simbera wrote:I think I've mentioned it in another thread, but I extended the "once, twice, thrice" system to be applicable to all numbers: just do it as "fourth, fifth, sixth" do it but replace the "th" with "ce". I tend to spell the 5 one "fivce" because I prefer how it looks, but everything else works exactly as you'd expect.


The great puzzle game Deadly Rooms of Death (see caravelgames.com) names its sub-levels by counting cardinal directions from the entrance room to the level: you might be playing level 4 once north twice west etc. They're going with the pseudolatinate option for the less-familiar numbers: Once, twice, thrice, quarce, quince, sence, septence ... (the actual latin ones are different: semel, bis, ter, quater; from there on out there's a productive -ies suffix as in quinquies, sexies ...)

As for myself, I've successfully introduced "workwithable" to a group of friends. It's an utterly pointless word since we use it to mean simply "workable".
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby heatsink » Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:05 pm UTC

No neologisms here, but I do play with grammar. I remove the auxiliary verb "do" from sentences.

It doesn't work. ⟶ It worksn't.
Where did they come from? ⟶ Whence came they?

I also mix the different uses of the copula.

This is a heavy box. ⟶ This box is a heavy.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Ephemeron » Wed Oct 30, 2013 11:39 pm UTC

I have another one, and it's a back-formation. Spread it around if you like it. :D

coland
[KOL-und / kɒlənd] v, transitive
To strain, to sieve, usually by means of a colander.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Copper Bezel » Thu Oct 31, 2013 4:09 am UTC

I bought a colander today, so I see myself using this term in the very near future. = )
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Rhombic » Sat Feb 22, 2014 7:23 pm UTC

articraft IPA: [ˈɑɾtɨˌkɾæft]
1. An invented design of an artifact used to solve some problem, usually kinda like a botched job that you don't care about, as long as it can get the work done.
2. An object, usually part of another one, which by itself has no interesting use whatsoever, ending up being used to play around, store in pencil-cases or use them as Proto-tools.
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