Names for new scientific discoveries

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EchoRomulus
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Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby EchoRomulus » Sat Jun 01, 2013 2:23 am UTC

I am concerned by electrons. (As we all should be.)

Whenever I watch the science channel, and they inevitably speak of anti matter, they refer to an electron's antimatter pair as either a "Position", a "Selectron" or an "Anti-Electron". This is confusing.

Now clearly all of these are appropriate names, (I do not understand the idea of adding an 's-' prefix to mean opposite but okay) but there is an undeniable fact we have to address; "Positron" is the coolest.

Now what would you name, say, antimatter Protons? Controns? Negatrons? Antitrons? Sprotons?

And what about Quarks? Squarks? Qualks?

I propose "Positron" set the standard, and we say "Negatrons".

I have no idea about Quarks, Neutrons, or even Neutrinos, though.

Science names should be cool.
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gmalivuk
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Jun 01, 2013 2:39 am UTC

EchoRomulus wrote:I do not understand the idea of adding an 's-' prefix to mean opposite
That's not what it means. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superpartner
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Derek
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby Derek » Sat Jun 01, 2013 5:23 am UTC

I have never heard "selectron". Positron is by far the most common term, with "anti-electron" appearing occasionally. The other particles are all "anti-" as far as I know.

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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Jun 01, 2013 5:25 am UTC

Right, because as I already pointed out, the 's' isn't for antiparticles.
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Carlington
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby Carlington » Sat Jun 01, 2013 5:32 am UTC

"Positron" kinda got grandfathered in, because it was named before we had a standard for naming antimatter.
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby PM 2Ring » Sat Jun 01, 2013 7:31 am UTC

EchoRomulus wrote:Now what would you name, say, antimatter Protons? Controns? Negatrons? Antitrons? Sprotons?

I've always liked the term "negatron", but I don't think I've ever seen it actually used, apart from in articles that mention it as a less common name for the antiproton.

Carlington wrote:"Positron" kinda got grandfathered in, because it was named before we had a standard for naming antimatter.

Good point. And all the Asimov fans would complain if "positron" were deprecated. :)

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EchoRomulus
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby EchoRomulus » Sun Jun 02, 2013 12:18 am UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
EchoRomulus wrote:I do not understand the idea of adding an 's-' prefix to mean opposite
That's not what it means. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superpartner


Through the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman didn't explain that bit.

They just had a wierd ramble about "Neil" and "Sneail" to explain.

My main point was "Negatron" though. I think people should start using it. But that's just my opinion.

Unless I find a way to get it on Wikipedia....and it will become a fact.
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby PM 2Ring » Sun Jun 02, 2013 2:54 am UTC

EchoRomulus wrote:My main point was "Negatron" though. I think people should start using it. But that's just my opinion.

I agree that it's a cool-sounding word, but I think it's more sensible to be systematic and use the "anti" prefix naming system for antimatter.

EchoRomulus wrote:Unless I find a way to get it on Wikipedia....and it will become a fact.

Huh? It's already on Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negatron wrote:Negatron may refer to:

• Electron, a subatomic particle formerly and occasionally known as negatron
• Negatron (album), a musical album by Canadian metal band Voivod
• Negatron, a four element vacuum tube which displays a negative resistance characteristic
• Antiproton, a less commonly used term for an antiproton or antimatter twin of the proton.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiproton wrote:The antiproton, or negatron, as it is less commonly known [...] is the antiparticle of the proton.

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EchoRomulus
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Re: Names for new scientific discoveries

Postby EchoRomulus » Sun Jun 02, 2013 3:23 am UTC

It is? Damn. I work fast.
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