spelling question (english-ish)

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mosc
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spelling question (english-ish)

Postby mosc » Mon Feb 01, 2016 8:18 pm UTC

Hard to ask how to spell a word you know you're misspelling.

Like if I want to invite you over to my house-restaurant I might say "welcome to ___ mosc". Shey? Chey? Chay? French sucks.

Help?
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Znirk
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Re: spelling question (english-ish)

Postby Znirk » Mon Feb 01, 2016 8:27 pm UTC

Why are we calling French English-ish? :|

It's "chez mosc".

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mosc
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Re: spelling question (english-ish)

Postby mosc » Mon Feb 01, 2016 8:46 pm UTC

It's sometimes used in English sentences. I think that makes it English-ish!

There are certainly other french words that show up in the english dictionary.

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Re: spelling question (english-ish)

Postby somehow » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:18 pm UTC

The strange part is that (as I understand it, bearing in mind that I don't speak French) "chez [name]" doesn't actually mean "[name]'s house" in French. It means "to [name]'s house" or "at [name]'s house". In other words, "chez" is a preposition meaning "(at/to/etc.) the house of". I think it's sometimes (maybe even mostly?) used in the same way in English, too, so that you'd say "I invited them to dinner on Friday night chez mosc" rather than "I invited them to dinner at chez mosc".
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Re: spelling question (english-ish)

Postby eviloatmeal » Mon Feb 08, 2016 2:28 pm UTC

somehow wrote:In other words, "chez" is a preposition meaning "(at/to/etc.) the house of".

I wouldn't say "house" or "home" is always implied.

"Chez moi" could mean "where I'm from" as much as it means "at/to my place."

"Chez le dentiste" could mean "at the dentist's house", if the context were something like "my neighbor is a dentist and I'm going to visit him", but really it translates to "at the dentist."

And to borrow one from wiktionary: "Il y avait telle coutume chez les Grecs", "there was such a custom among the Greeks."

As for French sucking, English is mostly French, anyway. Rogue, beef, pigeon. Favorite, royal, people, and so on, and so forth. The rest of English is just viking-speak, like "þe" and "egg" and "saga".
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Grop
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Re: spelling question (english-ish)

Postby Grop » Mon Feb 08, 2016 4:13 pm UTC

Well depending on context it is obvious whether you are talking about your place or some more generic place you are from.


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