Origin of "in grim despair and awestruck wonder"

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Suzaku
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Origin of "in grim despair and awestruck wonder"

Postby Suzaku » Thu Feb 04, 2016 7:51 am UTC

This phrase seems to be universal in online dictionary/thesaurus definitions of "awestruck" (e.g. here, but I haven't been able to find where it originates.

Just wondering if anyone knows, or has any educated guesses that I might be able to follow up?
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Lazar
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Re: Origin of "in grim despair and awestruck wonder"

Postby Lazar » Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:07 am UTC

In every ghit that I can find for it, it's paired with that exact definition, "having or showing a feeling of mixed reverence and respect and wonder and dread" – and Princeton University's WordNet lexical database, which you've linked, seems to be the original source. So I suspect that what you're observing is simply plagiaristic behavior on the part of "no-name" online dictionaries. You'll notice that it's not found in any of the more reputable ones, like Oxford, Cambridge, Collins, Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster or American Heritage.

As for the provenance of the phrase itself, it was probably just cooked up without any particular literary antecedent, as dictionary examples typically are. It seems a little purple, to be honest.
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Re: Origin of "in grim despair and awestruck wonder"

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Feb 04, 2016 5:43 pm UTC

It doesn't show up in the Google Books corpus, so I strongly doubt it has any literary origin.
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Suzaku
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Re: Origin of "in grim despair and awestruck wonder"

Postby Suzaku » Thu Feb 04, 2016 11:07 pm UTC

Thanks for the replies.
Pronouns: he/him/his > they/them/their >> it/it/its
Time Zone: JST (UTC+9)
─────────────────────────
Some guy on the Internet wrote:The thing about the inevitable, it has a bad habit of actually happening.


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