¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Marywoeste
Posts: 25
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:26 am UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Marywoeste » Thu May 06, 2010 12:03 pm UTC

Also, you said "Llevo aprendiendo...", so can "Llevar" also be like "estar" in terms of present continuous? That's really interesting!
In the beginning, the Universe was created. This made a lot of people angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

Twelfthroot
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 1:40 am UTC
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Twelfthroot » Thu May 06, 2010 5:08 pm UTC

The verb llevar has many uses, but no, it can't quite be used as a present continuous modal in all cases - in this usage, it indicates a certain amount of time spent doing something. That is, how much spent time you have (or "carry") spent having done something. For example:

Llevan tres días tratando de hacerlo.
They've been trying to do it for three days.

Aprender a bailar lleva tiempo.
Learning to dance takes time.

Somewhat similarly, you can use the past participle to suggest having something done, with a nuance of duration / continuation:

Llevo leídas cincuenta páginas y todavía no entiendo ni madre.
I've read fifty pages (I've been reading for fifty pages / I have fifty pages read already) and I still don't understand shit.

But you can't just substitute it for estar in progressive constructions - *Él lleva lavando los platos. doesn't mean "He's washing the dishes." -- as far as I know it doesn't mean anything, unless it has some nonstandard / casual meaning I haven't heard (which is very possible -- native speakers?)


Also, if you realized this my apologies for re-explaining it, but I wasn't sure you were clear - "aprendiendo lo" is not technically correct; it's aprendiéndolo. Object pronouns can be placed after a gerund / present participle, and if they are, they must be affixed to it -- which can require an orthographic accent since they don't move the stressed syllable.

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Thu May 06, 2010 7:21 pm UTC

Marywoeste wrote:
kernelpanic wrote: But like you said, "I've been learning it for two days" is the way to go, and there are many ways to say it, like "Llevo aprendiéndolo por dos días", "Lo estoy aprendiendo desde hace dos días", "Hace dos días empecé a aprender español", etc.


I looked up aprender in a conjugation table, but I couldn't find aprendiendolo. I was really confused. And then I realized you meant "aprendiendo lo." :P

No, I didn't. That is a perfectly valid (and seldom used) word. That conjugation is used as such:

A: ¿De quién es ese libro?
Now, here B has two options:
B1: Mío. Lo estoy leyendo.
B2: Mío. Estoy leyéndolo.
Those two are exactly the same, as the "lo", instead of being an indefinite article (implied by A's question to be the book), is being appended to the end of the gerund ("leyendo")

Just out of curiosity, where was your table printed? Maybe it's from somewhere where that verb form is not used at all.
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

Twelfthroot
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 1:40 am UTC
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Twelfthroot » Thu May 06, 2010 8:21 pm UTC

Just out of curiosity, where was your table printed? Maybe it's from somewhere where that verb form is not used at all.


Actually, I don't think I've ever seen a verb table with these forms printed. Given that they're 100% regular and the same for every verb, it's probably unnecessary.

RabidDracoMukluk
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri May 23, 2008 5:53 pm UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby RabidDracoMukluk » Thu May 06, 2010 9:32 pm UTC

kernelpanic: Muchas gracias por tu ayuda. Todavía no tengo mucho confianza con el uso de "tu" y "usted" porque no nos enseña cuándo debemos usar los dos en la escuela. He tenido experiencia con el idioma en la clase, pero nunca he tenido ninguna experiencia con la conversación diaria.

A todos, especialmente los habladores nativos, tengo una pregunta. ¿Hay una diferencia entre "el/la/los/las cual(es)" y "el/la/los/las que" en las cláusulas relativias? ¿Por ejemplo, en la siguiente oración, sería otro sentido si se usara la otra frase en los dos lugares?

Los viajes que más le atraen son los que salen de Arroyo Hondo, pasando por aguas espumosas, las cuales son muy peligrosas.

Mis profesores me han dicho que necesito escuchar y leer más español para saber cuál es correcto, pero quiero que haya una regla, o una razón...

(In case it's not clear, my question is whether there is a difference in meaning between using "el/la/los/las cual(es)" and "el/la/los/las que" in relative clauses. Would there be different meanings of the above sentence if instead of using "los que" it were "los cuales" or, later, if instead of "las cuales" it was "las que"? Or are they just completely different? The teachers here have basically said that they're more or less interchangeable, and we'll just have to figure out through listening/reading when to use which.)

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Thu May 06, 2010 11:01 pm UTC

RabidDracoMukluk wrote:A todos, especialmente los habladores nativos, tengo una pregunta. ¿Hay una diferencia entre "el/la/los/las cual(es)" y "el/la/los/las que" en las cláusulas relativias? ¿Por ejemplo, en la siguiente oración, sería otro sentido si se usara la otra frase en los dos lugares?

Now I want to know that too. Even though I'm sure it's one of those rules that'll leave you more confused than how you started.
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
BrainMagMo
Posts: 185
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 6:22 am UTC
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby BrainMagMo » Thu May 20, 2010 6:18 pm UTC

RabidDracoMukluk wrote:kernelpanic: Muchas gracias por tu ayuda. Todavía no tengo mucho confianza con el uso de "tu" y "usted" porque no nos enseña cuándo debemos usar los dos en la escuela. He tenido experiencia con el idioma en la clase, pero nunca he tenido ninguna experiencia con la conversación diaria.

A todos, especialmente los habladores nativos, tengo una pregunta. ¿Hay una diferencia entre "el/la/los/las cual(es)" y "el/la/los/las que" en las cláusulas relativas? ¿Por ejemplo, en la siguiente oración, sería otro sentido si se usara la otra frase en los dos lugares?

Los viajes que más le atraen son los que salen de Arroyo Hondo, pasando por aguas espumosas, las cuales son muy peligrosas.

Mis profesores me han dicho que necesito escuchar y leer más español para saber cuál es correcto, pero quiero que haya una regla, o una razón...

(In case it's not clear, my question is whether there is a difference in meaning between using "el/la/los/las cual(es)" and "el/la/los/las que" in relative clauses. Would there be different meanings of the above sentence if instead of using "los que" it were "los cuales" or, later, if instead of "las cuales" it was "las que"? Or are they just completely different? The teachers here have basically said that they're more or less interchangeable, and we'll just have to figure out through listening/reading when to use which.)


Esa es la misma diferencia que usamos en inglés entre "those that" y "those which".

User avatar
Laogeodritt
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:17 pm UTC
Location: Québec, Canada
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Laogeodritt » Fri May 21, 2010 2:39 am UTC

BrainMagMo wrote:Esa es la misma diferencia que usamos en inglés entre "those that" y "those which".

Entonces ¿uno distingue oraciones relativadas determinativas (those that[1] = los que), y el otro (those which = los cuales) distingue las que son indeterminativas?

[1] En inglés, which puede también delimitar una oración relativada determinativa, pero sólo sin comas. Sin embargo, es un uso más raro.


(Por si fracasé exprimirme correctamente... aquí lo que quería decir en inglés:

In that case, one of them determines a restrictive relative clause, while the other determines a non-restrictive clause?

[1] In English, which can also be used to introduce a restrictive relative clause, but only without commas. It is nonetheless rarer - perhaps more common in formal writing.)
Image

User avatar
Slpee
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Jan 15, 2010 12:51 am UTC
Location: Cloud 9, just all the time.

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Slpee » Sat May 22, 2010 7:24 pm UTC

¡Hola! Yo he estudiado español por casi cuatro años. Estoy en la clase de español en mi escuela.
No me gusta hablar español, pero me gusta escribir y leer. Esto es perfecto para mi.
Yo sé el presente, el presente progressivo, el subjuntivo, el preterito, el imperfecto (y cuando lo usas), el presente perfecto, el pluscuamperfecto, (creo que es el nombre, es cuando dices "yo había jugado...") y el presente perfecto del subjuntivo.

pues, debo empezar un conversacion...pues...

¿Estudiaron uds. español en escuela? ¿O estudiaban en otro lugar/tiempo?
"Are you insinuating that a bunch of googly eyes hot-glued to a Cheeto constitutes a sapient being?"
Can't let you brew that Starbucks!


Image

User avatar
Weeks
Hey Baby, wanna make a fortnight?
Posts: 1866
Joined: Sat Aug 23, 2008 12:41 am UTC
Location: Panama

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Weeks » Sat May 22, 2010 8:43 pm UTC

Slpee wrote:¡Hola! Yo he estudiado español por casi cuatro años. Estoy en la clase de español en mi escuela.
No me gusta hablar español, pero me gusta escribir y leer. Esto es perfecto para mi.
Yo sé el presente, el presente progressivo, el subjuntivo, el preterito, el imperfecto (y cuando lo usas), el presente perfecto, el pluscuamperfecto, (creo que es el nombre, es cuando dices "yo había jugado...") y el presente perfecto del subjuntivo.

pues, debo empezar un conversacion...pues...

¿Estudiaron uds. español en escuela? ¿O estudiaban en otro lugar/tiempo?
Hola.

Nací en Panamá, así que el Español es mi lengua madre. ¿Qué te motivó a tomar la clase de Español? ¿A qué nivel de Español deseas poder hablar/escribir/leer?

(Haven't really been keeping up with the thread, but if you have a question you can PM me.)
Am I gregnant
suffer-cait wrote:One day I'm gun a go visit weeks and discover they're just a computer in a trashcan at an ice cream shop.
Kewangji wrote:I can solve nothing but I'd buy you chili ice cream if you were here, or some other incongruous sweet.

User avatar
Laogeodritt
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:17 pm UTC
Location: Québec, Canada
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Laogeodritt » Sun May 23, 2010 12:34 am UTC

Ha tanto más en un idioma que sólo la gramática y el vocabulario. Es después de poder escribir y entender perfectamente que alguno puede comenzar a realmente entender la belleza de una lingua. Ay, no estoy a esto nivel que con el inglés... =(

Estudio el español independiemente para ... creo seis o siete años, pero puede apenas practicarlo. Lo estudía porque lo necessitaba para la escuela secundaria a la cúal quería ir, y mismo que por fin no lo he ido, he continuado porque el poco del español que he aprendido habría activado in me un gran interés para las linguas.

Ay caramba, hace siglos que no escribí tanto en español. XD
Image

stolid
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 3:18 am UTC
Location: 25th state

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby stolid » Thu May 27, 2010 4:46 am UTC

Slpee wrote:¡Hola! Yo he estudiado español por casi cuatro años. Estoy en la clase de español en mi escuela.
No me gusta hablar español, pero me gusta escribir y leer. Esto es perfecto para mi.
Yo sé el presente, el presente progressivo, el subjuntivo, el preterito, el imperfecto (y cuando lo usas), el presente perfecto, el pluscuamperfecto, (creo que es el nombre, es cuando dices "yo había jugado...") y el presente perfecto del subjuntivo.

pues, debo empezar un conversacion...pues...

¿Estudiaron uds. español en escuela? ¿O estudiaban en otro lugar/tiempo?
Hola. Yo también he estudiado por tantos años como tí. Estoy de acuerdo con tu preferencía. Oír correctamente es difícil...Es más divertido escribir, especialmente si lo sabes muy bien como yo. ¡Y los nativos hablan tan rápido! Me gusta hablar (y puedo más o menos muy bien), pero cuando los nativos lo hacen, a veces estoy muy perdido. El año próximo voy a tomar español 5 en escuela y probablamente hacer el examen AP. ¡Espero que yo haga bien! Quiero hacer un menor (español necesita un verbo "menorar" en mi opinión) de español en la universidad. También pienso que estudiar fuera de los EE.UU. sería increíble.

¿Estudias otras idiomas? Es extraño pero estoy un poco obsesionado con sueco (Swedish). Sueña raro, pero la idioma es interesante y en muchas maneras muy facíl (no conjugación, similar con inglés, etc).
Registered Linux User #555399

User avatar
Laogeodritt
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:17 pm UTC
Location: Québec, Canada
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Laogeodritt » Thu May 27, 2010 5:06 am UTC

Estoy de acuerdo que los nativos son difíciles a entender, pero yo prefiero más hablar el idioma que escribirlo. No sé por qué - tal vez que escribirlo y leerlo me parece más fácil (ya que hablo el francés corrientemente), y prefiero el desafío del hablar. *se encoge de hombros*
Image

Joeldi
Posts: 1055
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 1:49 am UTC
Location: Central Queensland, Australia
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Joeldi » Tue Jun 01, 2010 3:37 am UTC

Just starting reading up on Spanish. initially thought gender was gonna be the sticking point, but it seems article placement is what's really screwing me over.
I already have a hate thread. Necromancy > redundancy here, so post there.

roc314 wrote:America is a police state that communicates in txt speak...

"i hav teh dissentors brb""¡This cheese is burning me! u pwnd them bff""thx ur cool 2"

Twelfthroot
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 1:40 am UTC
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Twelfthroot » Wed Jun 02, 2010 10:31 pm UTC

Just starting reading up on Spanish. initially thought gender was gonna be the sticking point, but it seems article placement is what's really screwing me over.


Anything in particular we might be able to help you with? When to use or not use the article, what form of the article to use; or did you mean something else?

Hola...estoy contento que encontrar esta sitio


¡Hola! Bienvenido. ¿Cómo estas?

Espero que no te ofenda si te ofrezco unas pequeñas correcciones, pero "estoy contento que hacer algo" suena un poco raro. Más bien "estoy contento de encontrar este sitio", o tal vez "de haber encontrado". El error es semejante a decir "I'm happy that to find" en inglés. Y yo estoy contento de que lo hayas encontrado. ...espero no haberte quedado más confundido. Perdón; ¡bienvenido!

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Thu Jun 03, 2010 3:34 pm UTC

Twelfthroot wrote:
Hola...estoy contento que encontrar esta sitio

Espero que no te ofenda si te ofrezco unas pequeñas correcciones, pero "estoy contento que hacer algo" suena un poco raro. Más bien "estoy contento de encontrar este sitio", o tal vez "de haber encontrado". El error es semejante a decir "I'm happy that to find" en inglés. Y yo estoy contento de que lo hayas encontrado. ...espero no haberte quedado más confundido. Perdón; ¡bienvenido!

Y la palabra "sitio" es masculina; debe de ser "este sitio", no "esta sitio".
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

stolid
Posts: 167
Joined: Mon Sep 15, 2008 3:18 am UTC
Location: 25th state

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby stolid » Fri Jun 04, 2010 6:45 am UTC

Esto será un poco extraño, pero me ha molestado no poder decir lo que quiero cuando algo es muy bueno...en que esas palabras ("muy bueno") no son suficientes. Lo que más quiero traducir es algo similar con "awesome". He oído "guay" pero eso no me parece tanto fuerte y asocio eso con "cool". "Cool" y "awesome" significan más o menos lo mismo, pero varian en fuerza. También quiero saber si hay una frase coloquial como "that's the shit." Pueden ayudarme?

Phew. That was huge attempt at trying to naturally express myself (without rephrasing anything or pouring over it too much). I wonder how I did..
Registered Linux User #555399

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:14 pm UTC

stolid wrote:Esto será un poco extraño, pero me ha molestado no poder decir lo que quiero cuando algo es muy bueno...en que esas palabras ("muy bueno") no son suficientes. Lo que más quiero traducir es algo similar con "awesome". He oído "guay" pero eso no me parece tanto fuerte y asocio eso con "cool". "Cool" y "awesome" significan más o menos lo mismo, pero varian en fuerza. También quiero saber si hay una frase coloquial como "that's the shit." Pueden ayudarme?

Phew. That was huge attempt at trying to naturally express myself (without rephrasing anything or pouring over it too much). I wonder how I did..

As you likely have noticed, that's slang domain, in which case you have to be careful not to use it in inappropriate situations and when you are speaking with someone from a country with different slang; you sound like a complete moron. "Guay" is used in South America, and rarely in Spain. I could help you with Mexican (If you're from the US, I recommend that) and maybe Spanish (If you're from the UK) slang, and if you're from somewhere else, think about this: what is most likely to be the nationality of whoever you have to speak spanish with?
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
gaurwraith
Posts: 285
Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:56 pm UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby gaurwraith » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:49 pm UTC

Guay se usa mucho en España también, yo pensaba que era en Sudámerica donde no se usaba...

Para decir muy bueno de otra forma, "awesome", sin ir al ámbito coloquial puedes usar:

genial
fantástico
muy muy bueno :)
maravilloso

Y otros más coloquiales (en España)

cojonudo: Es una película cojonuda / Ese guitarrista es cojonudo I recommend this for awesome, only in very informal situations.

es la polla: Esa película es la polla / Ese guitarrista es la polla

tremendo: Esa película es tremenda / Ese guitarrista es tremendo

que te cagas: Esa película está que te cagas / Ese guitarrista toca (la guitarra) que te cagas (if you say está que te cagas, you mean himself)

muy chulo: Esa película está muy chula / Tu nuevo disco está muy chulo

En México podrías decir cuando algo es muy bueno, que está padre: Esa película está padre
I am a lvl 89 sword barb

Joeldi
Posts: 1055
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 1:49 am UTC
Location: Central Queensland, Australia
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Joeldi » Sat Jun 05, 2010 4:16 am UTC

Twelfthroot wrote:
Just starting reading up on Spanish. initially thought gender was gonna be the sticking point, but it seems article placement is what's really screwing me over.


Anything in particular we might be able to help you with? When to use or not use the article, what form of the article to use; or did you mean something else?



Well, I'm not really taking this 100% seriously, so you can put an explanation if you like and I'll read it, but for now I'm happy just learning verb conjugations and building some vocabulary.
I already have a hate thread. Necromancy > redundancy here, so post there.

roc314 wrote:America is a police state that communicates in txt speak...

"i hav teh dissentors brb""¡This cheese is burning me! u pwnd them bff""thx ur cool 2"

User avatar
animeHrmIne
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 4:33 pm UTC
Location: Missouri, USA, Sol III

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby animeHrmIne » Sat Jun 05, 2010 6:50 pm UTC

¡Hola!

Ahora que no tengo que ir a la escuela por tres meses, creo que necesito practicar mi español más. Acabo de terminar mi cuarto año de clases de español. En el año proximo, voy a tomar la clase de SL IB Español, y después HL IB Español. Es necesario que antes de ese año yo pueda hablar y escribir en Español, y entender Español escrito y hablado. Ahora, puedo entender lo que leo bien, y puedo hablar sin piensando en cada palabra. No puedo escribir muy bien porque siempre quiero usar palabras que no conozco bien – pienso en una palabr en Ingles, busco por él en un diccionario, elijo unas palabras, busco por aquéllos, elijo el mejor. Lo hizo cada vez porque no quiero usar una palabra con la connotación incorrecta. También, no puedo entender español hablado, porque no puedo ver como las palabras están escritos, y entonces no puedo ver los <<h>>s, o puedo distinguir entre <<ll>> y <<y>>.

Pues, tengo dos preguntas para Uds.

1) ¿Pronuncia una palabra que empieza con <<h>> diferente que una que no lo tiene?

2) He visto tres tipos de marcas que están usados por “” en Ingles, – – , <<>>, y “”. ¿Que son las reglas? ¿Cuando debo usarlos?

((P.S. Sorry if my spelling is a bit off in some places. My keyboard is crap.))
I wanted to see the universe, so I stole a Time Lord and ran away. And you were the only one mad enough.
Biting's excellent! It's like kissing, only there's a winner.
-Sexy

Twelfthroot
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 1:40 am UTC
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Twelfthroot » Sat Jun 05, 2010 11:14 pm UTC

¡Hola, animeHrmIne!

Siento lo que dices; a menudo no se puede entender lo que dice un hispanohablante aunque se conocen las palabras. Por supuesto, la conexión entre lo hablado y lo escrito es algo tenue, y como la que hay entre la música y la partitura, sólo una representación. Sin embargo, creo que es una lástima que no hay más películas disponibles en español con subtítulos en español (o al menos, yo no las puedo encontrar). Me parece que escuchar el idioma mientras leyendo lo que se oye ayuda mucho la comprensión oral.

Para contestar tus preguntas, en la mayoría de las variedades del español no se pronuncia la hache nunca. Simplemente hay que saber si la palabra se escribe con h. (Por esto muchas hablantes nativas confunden "haber" y "a ver" cuando las escriben.) Sí hay dialectos que tienen la hache aspirada pero como estudiante es más importante poder oír palabras con haches no pronunciadas. (Una palabra con hache que tal vez oirás pronunciada como jota es hámster, pero si alguien la pronuncia así, quizá la escribirá jámster. No es estándar.)

La elle y la y griega es un asunto más complicado. Algunos dialectos las distingue, otros no. También varían sus maneras de articularse. Lo que te sugiero es que escoges el tipo de español que quieres aprender, y escucharlo hasta que sepas los sonidos de las palabras y la distinción (o la falta de distinción) entre ll e y. Si alguien dice sólo "se cayó" en un dialecto que nunca he oído, yo no voy a saber si es realmente "se calló" sin el contexto. Qué opinan los hablantes nativos; ¿podrían distinguirlas?

Algunos detalles pequeños: no se dice "buscar por". Yo busco palabras. Los idiomas no se escriben con mayúsculas. Pero tu español me parece bien, creo que te irán bien tus clases que vienen.


...ya que acabo de escribir mucho en poco tiempo, seguro que hay errores; por favor corríjanme, gracias.

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:02 am UTC

animeHrmIne wrote:1) ¿Pronuncia una palabra que empieza con <<h>> diferente que una que no lo tiene?

2) He visto tres tipos de marcas que están usados por “” en Ingles, – – , <<>>, y “”. ¿Que son las reglas? ¿Cuando debo usarlos?

((P.S. Sorry if my spelling is a bit off in some places. My keyboard is crap.))

1: La verdad, no. Tal vez "hu" puede pronunciarse como "w" en inglés (Chihuahua -> "chiwawa", pero "huso" (huso horario - time zone) suena igual que "uso")
2: los guiones se usan como comentario adicional: "Pepito iba al cine a ver una película - que por cierto no era muy buena - cuando fue abducido por extraterrestres". In English: "Timmy was going to see a movie - which really wasn't very good - when he was abducted by aliens"
2: La diferencia entre << >> y " " es tipográfica; puedes usar el que sea y se entiende lo que dices, pero lo que importa es que hay que ser consistente. Algunos textos usan " " para delimitar diálogo y << >> para delimitar citas textuales: " "Se lo juro, oficial, el niño iba caminando cuando lo raptaron los aliens", dijo Doña Hortencia, mientras el policía apuntaba en su libreta las palabras <<Hortencia - ¿sospechosa?>>". In English: " "I'm telling you, officer, the kid was walking by when the aliens took him", said Mrs. Jones, while the policeman wrote in his notebook <<Mrs. Jones - suspect?>>".
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
animeHrmIne
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 4:33 pm UTC
Location: Missouri, USA, Sol III

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby animeHrmIne » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:46 am UTC

kernelpanic wrote:2: La diferencia entre << >> y " " es tipográfica; puedes usar el que sea y se entiende lo que dices, pero lo que importa es que hay que ser consistente. Algunos textos usan " " para delimitar diálogo y << >> para delimitar citas textuales: " "Se lo juro, oficial, el niño iba caminando cuando lo raptaron los aliens", dijo Doña Hortencia, mientras el policía apuntaba en su libreta las palabras <<Hortencia - ¿sospechosa?>>". In English: " "I'm telling you, officer, the kid was walking by when the aliens took him", said Mrs. Jones, while the policeman wrote in his notebook <<Mrs. Jones - suspect?>>".


Pero en mis clases, hemos leido cuentos en que usan un –- donde usamos unos “” en Ingles. Lo he visto en fanficción* también. Por ejemplo:

–- No podemos hacerlo –- ella dijó en voz alta, –- Si lo hacemos, moriríamos.
–- Estás loca -- respondío su amiga.


*Sí, leo fanficción. En español. Lo ha ayudado.
I wanted to see the universe, so I stole a Time Lord and ran away. And you were the only one mad enough.
Biting's excellent! It's like kissing, only there's a winner.
-Sexy

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:59 pm UTC

animeHrmIne wrote:
kernelpanic wrote:2: La diferencia entre << >> y " " es tipográfica; puedes usar el que sea y se entiende lo que dices, pero lo que importa es que hay que ser consistente. Algunos textos usan " " para delimitar diálogo y << >> para delimitar citas textuales: " "Se lo juro, oficial, el niño iba caminando cuando lo raptaron los aliens", dijo Doña Hortencia, mientras el policía apuntaba en su libreta las palabras <<Hortencia - ¿sospechosa?>>". In English: " "I'm telling you, officer, the kid was walking by when the aliens took him", said Mrs. Jones, while the policeman wrote in his notebook <<Mrs. Jones - suspect?>>".


Pero en mis clases, hemos leido cuentos en que usan un –- donde usamos unos “” en Ingles. Lo he visto en fanficción* también. Por ejemplo:

–- No podemos hacerlo –- ella dijó en voz alta, –- Si lo hacemos, moriríamos.
–- Estás loca -- respondío su amiga.


*Sí, leo fanficción. En español. Lo ha ayudado.

Nunca había visto eso, probablemente sea algo local. De los libros en español que he leído, sin importar que estén escritos o impresos en México, Argentina, Colombia, o España, usan " ". A lo mejor te estás confundiendo con el guión largo, que como no aparece en los teclados se sustituye por dos cortos, pero ese no se usa para delimitar diálogo en línea:
...[Texto descriptivo]..."Sí", dijo pepito"...[más texto descriptivo]...
—Pero yo no creo que ese sea el caso —dijo su mamá.
—¿Pero porqué no? —dijo Pepito.
—Porque los ovnis no existen; —explicó su madre— son objetos ficticios.
—Pues si no me crees, me voy a mi cuarto.
—Muy bien, vete.
...[Texto descriptivo]...

Esto tiene reglas muy bien definidas:
1) Es un guión largo, no corto, y menos dos cortos.
2) El diálogo es de una sola persona, cuando alguien más habla se usa otro guión.
3) Todo el diálogo emitido por esta persona está en un párrafo separado.
4) No hay espacio entre el primer guión y el inicio del diálogo, pero sí hay entre el final del diálogo y el comentario final.
5) Sólo hay guión al final si se tiene que decir algo, como quién dijo lo precedente. Nótese como en las últimas dos líneas es obvio quien está hablando, por lo que se omite el guión.
6) Si se tiene que intercalar algo en la conversación (el —explicó su madre—) hay espacios exactamente como se muestra en el ejemplo.

Si no entendiste muy bien, aquí te va en inglés:
I'm going to use a programming analogy here. I think it'll help you understand even if you don't know how to program.
If you use " ", then you are inline with other text. Think of it as a simple command, say, create a variable. You wouldn't make a whole new function just to declare a variable, you simply put it in the main body of the program. However, if you are going to do something more complicated, for example, check if a number is prime, you normally use a separate function. That is the point of the em dash, separate a more complicated, important piece of dialog from the main body of the text. However, it must NOT be used inline, just like you can either type the whole function into the program, or you can put it elsewhere so both the function (i.e., dialog) and the main body (i.e., descriptive text) are clearer, but you can't (well, you can, but it's stupid) define a function inside the main body and use it straight afterwards.
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
animeHrmIne
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 4:33 pm UTC
Location: Missouri, USA, Sol III

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby animeHrmIne » Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:25 pm UTC

Me acuerdo de ti, lo que dices parece correcto, pero los cuentos que he leído usan - o -- en párrafos. Un ejemplo que no he leído, pero lo demuestra. No solo están usados en párrafos sin descripción. Los he visto en párrafos largos cuales tienen solo una palabra de diálogo. El mejor cantidad de los cuentos que he leído usan -, no usan "" o <<>>. He visto "" en traduciones, y he visto <<>> para letras, pero es raro que veo ellos para diálogo.

ETA: Estoy tonta. No te entendí. Entiendo ahora. Lo borraría, pero quiero que alguien corrige lo que he escribido. Yo usaría un guión, pero no puedo en mi teléfono, y cuando trato de usarlos en mi computadora cambian a guiones cortos. No sé porque. Uso dos guiones cortos usualmente por un guión. Gracias por tu ayuda.

He cambiado éste alrededor diez veces. ¡No puedo pensar hoy!

Una pregunta mas: ¿Cual palabra/frase se usan por "anyway"? Por ejemplo, -Era interesante. Ella se dice algo, y él se enoja, y ... (anyway) ... Era interesante.- Cuando está usado como un interjección, después de dicieno algo que no es importante.

Una cosa más: me gusta escribir español en mi iPhone. Puedo usar un teclado para español y mi teléfono "autocorrecta" las palabras que necesitan tildes, y en palabras como esta/está solo tengo que tocar la letra por un ratito y el teclado muestra todos los tildes (aáàäâãåąæā, por ejemplo). Me lo gusta mucho.
I wanted to see the universe, so I stole a Time Lord and ran away. And you were the only one mad enough.
Biting's excellent! It's like kissing, only there's a winner.
-Sexy

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Mon Jun 07, 2010 12:22 am UTC

animeHrmIne wrote:Me acuerdo de , lo que dices parece correcto, pero los cuentos que he leído usan - o -- en párrafos. Un ejemplo que no he leído, pero lo demuestra. No solo están usados en párrafos sin descripción. Los he visto en párrafos largos los cuales tienen solo una palabra de diálogo. El mejor cantidad de los cuentos que he leído usan -, no usan "" o <<>>. He visto "" en traduciones, y he visto <<>> para letras, pero es raro que veo ellos para diálogo.

ETA: Estoy tonta. No te entendí. Entiendo ahora. Lo borraría, pero quiero que alguien corrija lo que he escribido. Yo usaría un guión, pero no puedo en mi teléfono, y cuando trato de usarlos en mi computadora cambian a guiones cortos. No sé porque. Uso dos guiones cortos usualmente por un guión. Gracias por tu ayuda. ["Usualmente", aunque sé que existe, por alguna razón que la verdad no puedo explicar no se usa. Si quieres un análogo para "usually", usa "normalmente", pero va al principio - "Normalmente uso dos..."]

He cambiado éste alrededor diez veces. [Esta oración tiene dos errores: debe de ser "Lo he cambiado alrededor de diez veces" o "...cambiado unas diez...".]¡No puedo pensar hoy!

Una pregunta más: ¿Cual palabra/frase se usan por "anyway"? Por ejemplo, -Era interesante. Ella se dice algo, y él se enoja, y ... (anyway) ... Era interesante.- Cuando está usado como un interjección, después de diciendo algo que no es importante. En fin.

Una cosa más: me gusta escribir español en mi iPhone. Puedo usar un teclado para español y mi teléfono autocorrige las palabras que necesitan tildes, y en palabras como esta/está solo tengo que tocar la letra por un ratito y el teclado muestra todos los tildes (aáàäâãåąæā, por ejemplo). Me lo gusta mucho.[el "lo" no va ahí.]
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
BrainMagMo
Posts: 185
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 6:22 am UTC
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby BrainMagMo » Mon Jun 14, 2010 1:57 am UTC

Laogeodritt wrote:
BrainMagMo wrote:Esa es la misma diferencia que usamos en inglés entre "those that" y "those which".

Entonces ¿uno distingue oraciones relativadas determinativas (those that[1] = los que), y el otro (those which = los cuales) distingue las que son indeterminativas?

[1] En inglés, which puede también delimitar una oración relativada determinativa, pero sólo sin comas. Sin embargo, es un uso más raro.


(Por si fracasé exprimirme correctamente... aquí lo que quería decir en inglés:

In that case, one of them determines a restrictive relative clause, while the other determines a non-restrictive clause?

[1] In English, which can also be used to introduce a restrictive relative clause, but only without commas. It is nonetheless rarer - perhaps more common in formal writing.)


¡Me parece que me entendiste perfectamente!

acastro12
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jun 15, 2010 10:38 pm UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby acastro12 » Tue Jun 15, 2010 10:47 pm UTC

Para corregir los acentos en español puedes usar esta pagina es muy buena : espanol.17style.com , aquí tu puedes incluso mejorar tu escritura en español que no es nada fácil.

suerte.

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Wed Jun 16, 2010 12:49 am UTC

acastro12 wrote:Para corregir los acentos en español puedes usar esta pagina es muy buena : espanol.17style.com , aquí tu puedes incluso mejorar tu escritura en español que no es nada fácil.

suerte.

O si no, recuerda cómo usarlos.

Si ya se te olvidó, aquí está.
Primero, hay que ver donde está la sílaba con el énfasis. Si es la última, la palabra es aguda. (p. ej. cambié). Si es la penúltima, entonces es grave o llana. (p. ej. peso). Si es la antepenúltima, entonces es una esdrújula. (p. ej. México). Si hay tres o más sílabas después de la del énfasis, es una sobreesdrújula. Las esdrújulas y sobreesdrujulas siempre llevan acento.

Después, ve a la última letra. Si es vocal, "n" ó "s", y la palabra es aguda, lleva acento. Si es grave, no lo lleva.
Si no es ni vocal, ni "n" ni "s", y es aguda, no hay acento. Si es grave, sí hay.

Por regla general las monosilábicas nunca llevan acento, a menos de que haya otra palabra con significado diferente que se escribe igual (él (he) -> el (the, masculine), mas (but) -> más (more)). UN CASO ESPECIAL ES "O" (or): nunca lleva acento, a menos de que estés enumerando letras o números: "1, 2, ó 3", "uno, dos, o tres", "a, b, ó c", "a, be, o ce", esto es para distinguir entre la palabra y el cero (números) y la palabra y la letra.

Además del acento agudo: á, é, í, ó, ú, hay otros dos:
Diéresis (umlaut): ü. Este se usa para difrenciar entre "ge", /je/, "Gerónimo"; "gue", /ge/, "Maguey"; y "güe", /gue/, "ungüento", y entre "gi", /ji/, "gis"; "gui", /gi/, "guitarra"; y "güi", /gui/ "pingüino".
Tilde: ñ. Aunque muchas personas argumentan que la ñ es una letra separada, en realidad es una n con tilde, y no debe de ser considerada una letra aparte.
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
The Pigeons' Rule
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Jun 18, 2010 7:31 am UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby The Pigeons' Rule » Fri Jun 18, 2010 2:58 pm UTC

animeHrmIne wrote:Una pregunta mas: ¿Cual palabra/frase se usan por "anyway"? Por ejemplo, -Era interesante. Ella se dice algo, y él se enoja, y ... (anyway) ... Era interesante.- Cuando está usado como un interjección, después de dicieno algo que no es importante.


La traducción literal sería "De cualquier forma" o "De cualquier manera", pero en ese contexto no funciona. Podrías decir algo como "En fin" o "Cambiando de tema".
Image

pedrogpa
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 6:42 am UTC
Location: Lima

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby pedrogpa » Fri Jul 02, 2010 7:40 pm UTC

kernelpanic wrote:Además del acento agudo: á, é, í, ó, ú, hay otros dos:
Diéresis (umlaut): ü. Este se usa para difrenciar entre "ge", /je/, "Gerónimo"; "gue", /ge/, "Maguey"; y "güe", /gue/, "ungüento", y entre "gi", /ji/, "gis"; "gui", /gi/, "guitarra"; y "güi", /gui/ "pingüino".
Tilde: ñ. Aunque muchas personas argumentan que la ñ es una letra separada, en realidad es una n con tilde, y no debe de ser considerada una letra aparte.

La ñ (niño, España, etc) se considera como una letra. La "ch" (Chile, acechar) también es considerada por la rae como una letra más.

Los monosílabos que se tildan son:
Él (he)
Tú (you)
Mí (me)
Sí (yes)
Té (tea)
Sé (know)
Dé (give)
Más (more)
Ó (Ex: 1,2 ó 3)

También se tilda cuando se forma un hiato acentual y en algunos casos de triptongo

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Sat Jul 03, 2010 12:04 am UTC

pedrogpa wrote:Los monosílabos que se tildan son:
Él (he)
Tú (you)
Mí (me)
Sí (yes)
Té (tea)
Sé (know)
Dé (give)
Más (more)
Ó (Ex: 1,2 ó 3)


Y sus contrapartes sin acentos:

El (the, male)
Tu (your)
Mi (my)
Si (if)
Te (um... you, but in some weird sense which I have no words for explaining. It's like the you in "I killed you.", "Te maté.".)
Se (he/she/it <verb>)
De (from)
Mas (but)
O (see above)
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
animeHrmIne
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Jun 09, 2009 4:33 pm UTC
Location: Missouri, USA, Sol III

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby animeHrmIne » Sat Jul 03, 2010 7:48 pm UTC

kernelpanic wrote:Te (um... you, but in some weird sense which I have no words for explaining. It's like the you in "I killed you.", "Te maté.".)

(Indirect/direct) object pronoun.
I wanted to see the universe, so I stole a Time Lord and ran away. And you were the only one mad enough.
Biting's excellent! It's like kissing, only there's a winner.
-Sexy

Rilian
Posts: 496
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 1:33 pm UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Rilian » Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:03 pm UTC

Estoy aburrido.
I'm a burrito.
And I'm -2.

User avatar
toletum91zgz
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:49 pm UTC
Location: Zaragoza, Spain

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby toletum91zgz » Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:08 pm UTC

Me voy a presentar aqui porque no veo otro sitio para presentarme sin pegarle patadas al diccionario.

Me he registrado ya que, googleando en busca de la viñeta "With Apologies to Robert Frost", he encontrado que había un hilo en español dentro de Xkcd.

Asi que bueno, aqui estoy yo. Ahora practicare un poco mi inglés por el resto de los temas.

Saludos!

User avatar
toletum91zgz
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:49 pm UTC
Location: Zaragoza, Spain

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby toletum91zgz » Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:25 pm UTC

Hola a todos!

Buscando la tira de "With apologies to Robert Frost" he encontrado que el foro de Xkcd tiene un apartado en español, asi que procedo a presentarme aqui (mejor que en el general, que las patadas que le daría al diccionario serían curiosas).

Un saludo!

User avatar
kernelpanic
Posts: 891
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:26 am UTC
Location: 1.6180339x10^18 attoparsecs from Earth

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby kernelpanic » Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:40 pm UTC

toletum91zgz wrote:Hola a todos!

Buscando la tira de "With apologies to Robert Frost" he encontrado que el foro de Xkcd tiene un apartado en español, asi que procedo a presentarme aqui (mejor que en el general, que las patadas que le daría al diccionario serían curiosas).

Un saludo!

Bienvenido, espero que te guste este foro.
Nada más que este tema es para que los que sí hablamos español, ayudemos a los que no. Lamentablemente no hay donde discutir en español, pero con que tu inglés sea entendible es suficiente, no debes de ser un doctor en letras para poder contribuir ideas.
I'm not disorganized. My room has a high entropy.
Bhelliom wrote:Don't forget that the cat probably knows EXACTLY what it is doing is is most likely just screwing with you. You know, for CAT SCIENCE!

Image

User avatar
toletum91zgz
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:49 pm UTC
Location: Zaragoza, Spain

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby toletum91zgz » Thu Jul 15, 2010 10:04 pm UTC

kernelpanic wrote:
toletum91zgz wrote:Hola a todos!

Buscando la tira de "With apologies to Robert Frost" he encontrado que el foro de Xkcd tiene un apartado en español, asi que procedo a presentarme aqui (mejor que en el general, que las patadas que le daría al diccionario serían curiosas).

Un saludo!

Bienvenido, espero que te guste este foro.
Nada más que este tema es para que los que sí hablamos español, ayudemos a los que no. Lamentablemente no hay donde discutir en español, pero con que tu inglés sea entendible es suficiente, no debes de ser un doctor en letras para poder contribuir ideas.


Perfecto, es justo lo que buscaba, aunque mi inglés, verdaderamente es bastante "FromLostToTheRiveriano" :lol: Lo solía practicar con gente en SkypeMe hace muuuuucho tiempo :D

Gracias por la bienvenida KernelPanic :wink:

User avatar
Marywoeste
Posts: 25
Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:26 am UTC

Re: ¡Hablamos español! (Spanish Practice)

Postby Marywoeste » Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:21 pm UTC

Hey, Folks! I've posted before, but I'm really just starting with Spanish and I was wondering if anyone here could recommend other places where spanish can be practiced. Websites with beginners videos, maybe? I've got books and such, but I think listening practice would be really helpful. Really anything would be great - news websites, podcasts, radio stations, whatever. I just don't know where to look.

Muchas gracias por la ayuba!
In the beginning, the Universe was created. This made a lot of people angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.


Return to “Language/Linguistics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests