The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

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The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby The_Duck » Wed Feb 20, 2008 4:42 am UTC

Not so long ago I re-read The Lord of the Rings and just now I finished The Silmarillion and The Children of Húrin. One of the fascinating things about these books to me is the linguistic style Tolkien uses. The following is my rambling about that followed by some questions:

Tolkien's diction is somewhat archaic, which is fun: the stories are full of "thralls", and "doom" in the neutral sense of "fate", and people "dwelling" instead of "living"; plus lots of "henceforth"s and "unto"s; and lots of sentences starting with "And" and "But" and "For". Most of his sentences would sound strange if spoken today

A typical, if long, example:
Tolkien wrote:Who knows now the counsels of Morgoth? Who can measure the reach of his thought, who had been Melkor, mighty among the Ainur of the Great Song, and sat now, the dark lord upon a dark throne in the North, weighing in his malice all the tidings that came to him, whether by spy or by traitor, seeing in the eyes of his mind and understanding far more of the deeds and purpose of his enemies than even the wisest of them feared, save Melian the Queen. To her often his thought reached out, and there was foiled.


Some of his sentences can be complex and hard to parse at first, but figuring them out is entertaining, and often it seems that Tolkien's sentence is more precise and gives the reader a better sense of what he is talking about that it would if it was simplified or broken into separate sentences. I get the same thing with Shakespeare sometimes.

Finally, I feel like Tolkien goes to some lengths to avoid Latin-based words in these works, preferring words with roots in Old English and such. This fits with a letter by Tolkien printed in the second edition of The Silmarillion, in which he says that "I had a mind to make a body of more or less connected legend... which I could dedicate simply to: to England; to my country" -- Tolkien perceived that while the rest of the world was rich in stories and legend, England was lacking in this area. I think this goes a long way toward producing the atmosphere that he is trying to create. I play a text-based medieval roleplaying game, and after reading Tolkien I find myself avoiding Latin-based words in my roleplay as well (though my knowledge of etymology is slim). Words that are broken down into distinct roots seem less--potent, less emotionally charged, than one whole word to mean one thing. An example of me imitating Tolkien:

The_Duck wrote:Then the captain spoke of all his journeying in the inner sea. Tales he told of the island realms of Raviel and Nebel, and the strange land of Libidizedd, and the distant outpost of Valkyrja upon Yggdramir, and of Giask, the greatest of them all, whose spires were said to be visible from twenty leagues away in fair weather. And at the captain's word the sea was scattered with atolls and peopled with fierce marauders, who stole what they could and sunk what they could not. Therefore he told also of his struggles against the pirates and the valor of his crews in moments of peril. And by the time the tale drew on to the captain's waning years the sky had lightened in the east, and the sun's first rays touched upon the approaching shores of Madina.


My questions are:
-Was Tolkien's writing style typical for his time, or archaic even then?
-Are there other works, modern or otherwise, written in the same general style?
-Is anyone else interested in this kind of stuff?
Last edited by The_Duck on Sun Mar 02, 2008 6:42 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby JayDee » Wed Feb 20, 2008 5:25 am UTC

I do think that Tolkien is most interesting on the linguistic levels. But I'm more interested in the elvish languages and scripts, or in the poetry. I honestly haven't looked at the actual text.

Also, this.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby SpitValve » Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:17 pm UTC

I don't think it was typical of his time... compare it to C.S. Lewis' sci fi books, which predate his Narnia books, and there's definitely a difference...

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Kabann » Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:23 pm UTC

To me the prose he tended to use in LOTR, and even more so in parts of The Silmarillion, was similar to what you'd find in a biblical allegory - something reminiscent of epic tales handed down in a formal, oral tradition. Thus sentence structure more formal and dramatic than normal colloquial usage; storytelling as a performance art.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Marius Magnus » Thu Feb 21, 2008 10:52 am UTC

Tolkien wrote in a deliberately archaic style. He was a professor of linguistics, with a specialization in Anglo-Saxon and Norse languages, and he wrote in such a way as to mimic the epic poems such as Beowulf and the Norse sagas and eddas. In other writings (not LotR), he even wrote in alliterative verse! However, he introduced his own stylistic elements so as to help create his own world, distinct from the myths which were its inspiration.

A few of his tactics are easy to identify:

1. Use words with Anglo-Saxon roots in preference to Latinate ones.
2. Revive archaic elements of English grammar, such as V2 word order and simple present tense (i.e. "He comes" vs. "He is coming").
3. Write sentences with freer word order in general, as though English still had case-forms.
4. (Conjecture) Some elements of his English syntactical structure are very likely drawn from the Elvish languages he created.

All of these he was well-suited to accomplish, because they related directly to his specialty.


Oh, and by the way, I'm new. Hi there!

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Ari » Thu Feb 21, 2008 11:13 am UTC

Marius Magnus wrote:2. Revive archaic elements of English grammar, such as V2 word order and simple present tense (i.e. "He comes" vs. "He is coming").

...

Oh, and by the way, I'm new. Hi there!


Welcome :)

Just a note- that's actually an example of using the simple present as opposed to using the present continuous. V2 word order means the operative verb is always the "second idea" of the sentence, not that one avoids tenses with auxillary verbs like the present continuous with its "is coming". You're right that this is a revival of archaic language, of course.

As for V2- in German, V2 word order involves moving the verb into primary position after a relative clause, the possibility of subject-object reversal in terms of sentence position, and sometimes the pushing of the subject into the third spot in the sentence if you have a particularly pressing adverb. (they'll usually be time-based adverbs, as those tend to take precedence in German word order)
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Marius Magnus » Thu Feb 21, 2008 11:29 am UTC

Ari wrote:
Marius Magnus wrote:2. Revive archaic elements of English grammar, such as V2 word order and simple present tense (i.e. "He comes" vs. "He is coming").

...

Oh, and by the way, I'm new. Hi there!


Welcome :)

Just a note- that's actually an example of using the simple present as opposed to using the present continuous. V2 word order means the operative verb is always the "second idea" of the sentence, not that one avoids tenses with auxillary verbs like the present continuous with its "is coming". You're right that this is a revival of archaic language, of course.

As for V2- in German, V2 word order involves moving the verb into primary position after a relative clause, the possibility of subject-object reversal in terms of sentence position, and sometimes the pushing of the subject into the third spot in the sentence if you have a particularly pressing adverb. (they'll usually be time-based adverbs, as those tend to take precedence in German word order)


I know. I think you parsed me wrong. I meant:

(Revive) (archaic elements (of English grammar)), such as ((V2 word order) and (simple present tense (i.e. "He comes" vs. "He is coming"))).

Hooray for ambiguous natural language syntax!

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Kaiyas » Fri Feb 22, 2008 3:39 am UTC

Marius Magnus wrote:Tolkien wrote in a deliberately archaic style. He was a professor of linguistics, with a specialization in Anglo-Saxon and Norse languages, and he wrote in such a way as to mimic the epic poems such as Beowulf and the Norse sagas and eddas. In other writings (not LotR), he even wrote in alliterative verse! However, he introduced his own stylistic elements so as to help create his own world, distinct from the myths which were its inspiration.

A few of his tactics are easy to identify:

1. Use words with Anglo-Saxon roots in preference to Latinate ones.
2. Revive archaic elements of English grammar, such as V2 word order and simple present tense (i.e. "He comes" vs. "He is coming").
3. Write sentences with freer word order in general, as though English still had case-forms.
4. (Conjecture) Some elements of his English syntactical structure are very likely drawn from the Elvish languages he created.

All of these he was well-suited to accomplish, because they related directly to his specialty.


Oh, and by the way, I'm new. Hi there!

He also adds some Norse culture, for example, the naming of weapons.

And I'm new, here too. lol.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby tavarilyn » Fri Feb 22, 2008 6:53 am UTC

For those that are interested in what Tolkien created linguistically, there is an excellent compilation at this site:

http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/

I have studied enough elvish to get by but am terribly rusty. Anyone interested in discussing JRRT's creative achievements with languages, please peruse that website. Some of the dictionaries there are quite extraordinary.

Tav

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby ave_matthew » Sun Feb 24, 2008 4:41 pm UTC

Also more new than old, Anyhow, I remember reading in one of the appendices that he also deliberately wrote different characters and scenes in different styles, because they weren't speaking English, so he tried to reflect the language that they were speaking in the English he used to represent it.
Ex. from the appendix : When everyone thinks the one of the hobbits (pippin I think) is a prince, it's partly because he is using familiar speech with a member of royalty (maybe something along the lines of T-V distinction)
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Parsifal » Thu Feb 28, 2008 1:41 am UTC

Tolkien's style was certainly archaic for the period in which he wrote. Furthermore, the diction and grammar varies widely among the different characters, and at times a given character's mode of speech changes based on the company, setting or situation. I highly recommend "Tolkien: Author of the Century" by Tom Shippey. I enjoy learning about languages but am not a linguist by training, so I found most of it interesting and insightful.

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Darcey » Thu Feb 28, 2008 2:03 am UTC

Marius Magnus wrote:All of these he was well-suited to accomplish, because they related directly to his specialty.


This is totally why I am planning on majoring in linguistics.

I've been noticing a lot lately about how the style of writing contributes to the mood of the story; I love use of archaic or more formal language in high fantasy and that's probably actually what makes high fantasy my favourite flavour of fantasy, whereas books such as the Harry Potter series really disappoint me because what is such an extraordinary world is made mundane by the use of casual, ordinary language and the lack of any kind of linguistical distinction between the muggles and the wizards except for a few extra vocab words. =(

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby lowbart » Thu Feb 28, 2008 2:48 pm UTC

Yeah, the wizards and muggles have been separate for so long that you'd think there would be a distinct difference in the way they talked. Even though they occupy the same cities and everything, the wizard culture is so insular most of the time (look at Ron Weasley's dad) that there would at least be slight differentiations in accent or sentence structure. Hogwarts should have developed its own slang, like Battle School in the Ender's Game series.

Still, even though it would sound right to the average 12 year old, it would be disappointing if the wizards had a sort of archaic grammar like in Tolkien. Don't speech patterns evolve faster in smaller groups? It would be more like the difference between UK and North American English, where some structures evolve in the one and stay the same in the other, and other structures stay the same in the one and change in the other. (For example: the N.A. usage "gotten", which has fallen out of fashion in England.

But as disappointing as it is, Rowling puts accessibility and story over realism (you know, the kind of realism where you introduce new, unrealistic elements to reality, but incorporate them in realistic ways). Most of her target audience would probably find the wizards hard to understand and wonder why they "talk funny".

Oh well. I have other problems with Rowling anyway, like how she made Harry into a sort of Christ-figure and had him steal the show from Neville, who was finally getting his chance to be a hero. Harry and Neville could have been great friends except that Harry sort of became a self-absorbed ass. Neville's parents were just as good counterterrorists or whatever, but he didn't get to be famous or anything. Neville was an underdog, and Rowling blew that chance, sort of like how George Lucas made Jedis into a genetic master race with his stupid midichlorian things, made Anakin Skywalker into a virgin-birth "Chosen One" figure.

Dammit.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Marius Magnus » Fri Feb 29, 2008 3:42 am UTC

Well, this is meant to be a Tolkien thread and not a Rowling thread, but it appears to be going that way. Anyway, I thought Rowling's writing was fine until she started making movies. And that is when she started writing movie scripts instead of novels. The books begin to decline after the fourth book, and the seventh is far and away the worst.

My biggest complaint is that not even Harry got the opportunity to be a real hero. Harry was never faced with a real moral choice. Harry never had to accomplish a daring deed. Nearly the entire series (and especially the last few books) are just one deus ex machina after another. When Harry was 11 it was okay; he was just a kid. But in a series that follows him year after year, I expected him to eventually grow up, and tackle his own problems. Not so! Harry doesn't even get a proper coming-of-age task; in fact, he is about a lose utterly when, through some fluke entirely unbeknown to him, he wins by a technicality of the wands!

I suppose one could also argue that Frodo also wins by accident, but at least Frodo was genuinely tested first, and Tolkien's setup makes the gravity of the situation clear: Frodo does have to make a decision, himself, and merely cannot fathom the will to do it. Harry Potter, on the other hand, is simply oblivious, is told what to do at every turn, and wins by tritely-conceived cinematic plot twist. If we should learn any moral from Harry Potter it is "Let the nanny take care of it", where from Frodo one can get something more like "Take care, for even you can succumb to evil". I was worried for Frodo, would he complete his task, would he live? But Harry Potter, I wanted to punch in the face.


On archaic diction and "high fantasy" vs. "low fantasy", I can appreciate both styles. But I have seen so much poorly-used archaic diction that I would highly recommend avoiding it unless you want to sound silly. The vast majority of people can't use "thou" and "ye" correctly, and the vast majority of those who can, can't figure out how to do it in a way that doesn't sound cheesy. Tolkien's advantage is that his life's work was to study those languages, and therefore he got a sense of how to use them effectively to write epic, rather than laughable, prose.

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby lowbart » Fri Feb 29, 2008 1:48 pm UTC

Marius Magnus wrote:Well, this is meant to be a Tolkien thread and not a Rowling thread, but it appears to be going that way.


I am fully in favor of keeping it a Tolkien thread. I just wanted to say that couple of things.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Mar 01, 2008 6:14 pm UTC

We should definitely keep it a Tolkien thread, and even if we do bring in discussion of other authors, it should be from a linguistic standpoint. Critiques of plot and style are best confined to the Books thread(s) already devoted to the likes of Harry Potter.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Alasseo » Sat Mar 01, 2008 9:39 pm UTC

I'm...something of a Tolkien fiend, though my innate inability to do well with actually learning languages means I never took the time to be able to speak/write any language/script. (That said, and as an interesting side note, I grasp the technical concepts very well, and was/am quite interested in learning Latin, a process hapmered by my school...curious selection (or lack thereof) of Latin teachers..) But, you know, omnia mihi lingua graeca sunt.

Moving on, and having read Shakespeare, the Divine Comedy (well, mostly the Inferno, but parts of Purgatorio and Paradiso), the Aenid, the Illiad, the Odyssey, and (this is where it all comes together) portions of The Commentarii de Bello Gallico in the Latin, writing style totally matters. Reading Caesar has been a study in language structure. As we (the class) move through it, unfamiliar constructions such as absurdly extended parallel constructions are pointed out to us by our instructor and it's explained how this would affect a Roman reader. It's very interesting and shows how proper control of a language can completely alter what the reader takes away from even a description of battle.

To answer the OP's question (and cause I read a chapter of HP and got disgusted):

-Intentionally archaic. As has been noted, it was desgined to sound and feel like an epic work. There aren't many of them around. Beowulf, the Illiad, the Aenid (also read some of that in Latin. Latin poetry is crazy hard to read), the Odyssey, possibly the Divine Comedy. It worked.

-See the above list, but "general style" is broad. Linguistically, or tone of the setting? A Song of Ice and Fire brushes on the linguistic tone, but has little or nothing to do with the tone of the setting. While I like the books, they don't actually strike me as epic, whereas Glenn Cook's The Black Company has something of the same tone (though the point is arguable), but doesn't really touch it linguistically. The Wheel of Time could be argued to show something of both, but I would put it closer to A Song of Ice and Fire setting-wise than The Black Company.

-Yeah.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby zenten » Mon Mar 03, 2008 12:39 pm UTC

On on topic question based on the mention of Harry Potter: How is the language use in the Hobbit? It's been awhile since I read it. I just though I'd bring up Tolkien's kids book.

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Plasmic-Turtle » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:44 am UTC

Darcey wrote: books such as the Harry Potter series really disappoint me because what is such an extraordinary world is made mundane by the use of casual, ordinary language


Harry Potter in Spanish = yay! super-accesible and fun!
LotR (even The Hobbit) in Spanish = hands tired from looking up millions of adjectives in my Spanish-English dictionary...

So yay for Harry Potter, may be a bit mundane in English, but it's great to help with a 2nd language (trusting that the translation was semi-OK).
@ zenten: It's been a while since I've read The Hobbit too, but from memory, although the plot & language as a whole is much more suited toward a younger audience, it still uses a wider vocabulary than most kid's books bother too - which I think is awesome, if society stopped dumbing things down for children so much it'd probably do wonders for their vocab?

Left most of my Tolkien at the parent's house, sadly. I was quite into him in my early-mid teens, and acquired a number of books from garage sales and the like: The Silmarillion, LotR, Hobbit, The Letter's of J.R.R. Tolkien, Farmer Giles of Ham, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil & other verses, and a couple of the Lost Tale ones I think? But it's been so long and I've crammed a lot of new stuff into my brain since then!

Actually I find Tom Bombadil kind of interesting. He's not part of a race like the other creatures, is he? I really read most of the books for fun, rather than delving into themes and meanings. Any thoughts on Tom?

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby zenten » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:06 pm UTC

Plasmic-Turtle wrote:Actually I find Tom Bombadil kind of interesting. He's not part of a race like the other creatures, is he? I really read most of the books for fun, rather than delving into themes and meanings. Any thoughts on Tom?


viewtopic.php?f=24&t=16068

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby mrbaggins » Wed Mar 26, 2008 11:59 am UTC

Tom Bombadil is my second favourite character in the entire set, and I was right PISSED OFF when they didn't include him and the barrowdowns in the movies.
I also believe it should have been 6 movies, not 3. But hey.

And no, Tom Bombadil isn't anything in particular, he's just the first. He was around to watch everyone else come into power/lose it, and is older than even most of the mountains (apparently). The ring has no power over him.

As for Tolkien and his writing, I really like his ability to add character to groups. An eleventy first birthday is bleedingly obvious as to what it means, but no-one in their right mind would think of calling it that.
I also used to think when I first read it that the writing style was to slow down the reader and have them really engage the imagery he was trying to capture. It's a bit longwinded at times, but you get a much more involved feeling from it.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Alasseo » Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:03 pm UTC

All this discussion about Tom, and no one has asked if Balrogs have wings or not? For shame. (they don't, obviously)
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby bbctol » Wed Mar 26, 2008 11:18 pm UTC

Alasseo wrote:All this discussion about Tom, and no one has asked if Balrogs have wings or not? For shame. (they don't, obviously)

Yes, they do. :twisted:

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby 4=5 » Thu Mar 27, 2008 8:12 am UTC

bbctol wrote:
Alasseo wrote:All this discussion about Tom, and no one has asked if Balrogs have wings or not? For shame. (they don't, obviously)

Yes, they do. :twisted:

yeah Bakshi clearly showed that they do! :mrgreen:

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby rockin2the70s » Thu Mar 27, 2008 1:01 pm UTC

How is the language in the Hobbit?


It's been a little while since I read it, but the way I remember, the general writing style was the same, but his sentences were far less convoluted. In other words, he got across the same anachronism, but without the confusion.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Mar 27, 2008 5:11 pm UTC

Please keep plot discussions out of this thread, which is to discuss the *language* of Tolkien's works.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby steewi » Thu Mar 27, 2008 11:48 pm UTC

Plasmic-Turtle wrote:Harry Potter in Spanish = yay! super-accesible and fun!
LotR (even The Hobbit) in Spanish = hands tired from looking up millions of adjectives in my Spanish-English dictionary...


I cut my teeth in Spanish by reading The Hobbit. I found that it had really good use of the T-V distinction and appropriately archaic style. And I learnt *so* many new words. I wasn't completely happy with all of the name translations, but that's probably best left to a different thread.

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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Eschatokyrios » Fri Mar 28, 2008 7:28 am UTC

steewi wrote:
Plasmic-Turtle wrote:Harry Potter in Spanish = yay! super-accesible and fun!
LotR (even The Hobbit) in Spanish = hands tired from looking up millions of adjectives in my Spanish-English dictionary...


I cut my teeth in Spanish by reading The Hobbit. I found that it had really good use of the T-V distinction and appropriately archaic style. And I learnt *so* many new words. I wasn't completely happy with all of the name translations, but that's probably best left to a different thread.


In the scenes with Pippen talking to Denethor, did the translator have him using "tú"? One of the appendixes explicitly mentioned that, because the Hobbits' dialect of Westron didn't have a T-V distinction but the Gondorians' did, Pippen used the non-formal pronoun with everybody and this made everybody else think his status in his home country was higher than it actually was. Also, it's details like these that make Tolkien phenominal as a world-builder, even if his writing is long-winded and dry.
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Re: J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby steewi » Sat Mar 29, 2008 11:17 am UTC

Eschatokyrios wrote:In the scenes with Pippen talking to Denethor, did the translator have him using "tú"? One of the appendixes explicitly mentioned that, because the Hobbits' dialect of Westron didn't have a T-V distinction but the Gondorians' did, Pippen used the non-formal pronoun with everybody and this made everybody else think his status in his home country was higher than it actually was. Also, it's details like these that make Tolkien phenominal as a world-builder, even if his writing is long-winded and dry.


Gandalf uses 'tu' with Denethor :

?Qué querrias entonces -- dijo Gandalf --, si pudieras hacer tu voluntad?

--RotK p160


Pippin uses 'tu' with Gandalf: "No podrias hacer algo? (rotk p154)

I haven't found a bit where Pippin uses 'you' to Denethor yet. They keep talking around the topic. I'll do a fuller search when I'm not about to fall asleep.

edit: Spelling errors in English and Spanish.

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Re: The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby ave_matthew » Sat Mar 29, 2008 9:35 pm UTC

Even if he didn't use it with denethor, using it with gandalf makes him pretty important, and I think I mentioned earlier that tolkien himself mentions that in the appendices so if you didn't go check , it'S true (unless we're both wrong )
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The Other languages of JRR Tolkien

Postby SaintBastard » Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:05 pm UTC

So I found a thread a few slots down about the sentence structure and word choice of Tolkien's english text...and so it made me wonder: how many people on this forum have a decent grasp of the languages he invented?

I've been trying to learn Quenya for fun for a while now, but as I obviously have no native speaker to practice with....

So basically my question is: does anyone here know Quenya Elvish?

Specifically, I was hoping to find someone to help proofread a translation I'm working on.

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Re: The Other languages of JRR Tolkien

Postby JayDee » Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:18 am UTC

I don't know why this couldn't fit in the other Tolkien language thread, but anyway.

I'm not much familiar with them, but I find the elvish languages fascinating. They are quite different to any other constucted language I've seen, not least because they are almost entirely unusable. Tolkien created with a linguistic-historical approach, so there is nothing like a complete lexicon, while there are essays on the history of the irregular verb 'to be', as an example.

The journal Vinyar Tengwar collects alot of those articles, and makes more interesting reading (if you like this sort of thing.)
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Re: The Other languages of JRR Tolkien

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Apr 04, 2008 5:31 pm UTC

JayDee wrote:I don't know why this couldn't fit in the other Tolkien language thread, but anyway.

It can, and in fact now does, since I moved it. The specific reason I changed the thread title to "The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien" was to allow for discussion of the languages he invented, in addition to talking about his use of English.
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Re: The Language(s) of J.R.R. Tolkien

Postby Alasseo » Mon Apr 07, 2008 3:11 am UTC

I'm passingly familiar with Quenya, but as they say, I know people, so if you want to post it here I'll take a look/have smarter people look too.
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Cirth Writing

Postby Bio Rules » Wed Apr 16, 2008 5:48 am UTC

Hey, I hope some others here are like me, and love Lord of the Rings so much, they learned the language Cirth, also known as the Angerthas or Runic Writing, out of the back of the third book. If you have, and would like to chat, I have a FaceBook group to write on, and as soon as my other computer boots up, I'm checking to see if these posts support the Cirth font I downloaded.
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Re: Cirth Writing

Postby Bio Rules » Wed Apr 16, 2008 5:57 am UTC

Drat, doesn't support the code. Oh well, I have yet to find a site that does, without going into pics. Guess that idea is out the window for now, unless anyone knows how to change it?
If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts.

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Re: Cirth Writing

Postby ZLVT » Wed Apr 16, 2008 7:43 am UTC

nah, the tengwar was cool, very cursive
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Re: Cirth Writing

Postby Bio Rules » Wed Apr 16, 2008 8:23 pm UTC

True, I just don't know it yet ;-) Maybe this summer I will have the time to learn that language too, but for now, Cirth is fine for me.
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Re: Cirth Writing

Postby ave_matthew » Thu Apr 17, 2008 4:06 am UTC

the cirth and tengwar are not languages, just alphabets, or do you mean that you learned a language that uses the cirth?
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Re: Cirth Writing

Postby ZLVT » Thu Apr 17, 2008 7:26 am UTC

hmm, I one went rhough and did some rudementary grammar/syntax annalysis based on the righting on the ring. t'was fun.
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