Saying "rabbit" in other languages

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
ave_matthew
Posts: 177
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 1:59 am UTC
Location: ici, here, oota, aqui, m'inade, cxi tie

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby ave_matthew » Wed Apr 09, 2008 6:15 pm UTC

According to one dicctionary, http://www.creedictionary.com, which is a compilation of several written ones.
Rabbit -> wapos [wapɔs] and not [wapʰɔs] or [waʰpɔs]
the plural is waposwak [wapɔswɶk] I think that's how to write in down with the IPA.

So in summary: In cree rabbit is wapos, and rabbits is waposwak.

In esperanto, rabbit is kunikulo. pl. kunikuloj

kihci okimaw : King
~ Important person in charge. (I find this funny cause I'm just learning cree and when I saw the words kihci okimaw, the first translation that sprang to my head was "very much the manager")
ave matthew, je m'appelle matthew, mi nomas matthew, me llamo matthew, I'm matthew.

GENERATION 22: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.

Rokue
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:04 pm UTC
Location: Finland

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Rokue » Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:35 pm UTC

In Finnish it's kani, pronounced "kani" (the k as the k in kite).

Stœnmaðr
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 18, 2008 4:13 pm UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Stœnmaðr » Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:50 pm UTC

Apart from lapin, in French we have an old, classy word which is a cognate of its italian and spanish counterparts : connil (/kɔ.nil/or connin, /kɔ.ñe/).

It got superseded by lapin because it was then too easy to do sexual allusions with it (due to its proximity with con, etymologically « cunt », now « a stupid person »).

Mad Cow Bomber
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2007 6:57 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Mad Cow Bomber » Fri Apr 25, 2008 1:04 am UTC

In Modern Standard Arabic, rabbit is "arnub".

User avatar
Arancaytar
Posts: 1642
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 12:54 am UTC
Location: 52.44°N, 13.55°E
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Arancaytar » Fri Apr 25, 2008 12:25 pm UTC

tiny wrote:In German it's Hase, Kaninchen, Karnickel or Rammler (this last one's for male rabbits only).

You could try Babelfish to find more: http://babelfish.altavista.com/


Hey, I never realized the origin of the verb "rammeln". :P
"You cannot dual-wield the sharks. One is enough." -Our DM.
Image

tractatus
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:01 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby tractatus » Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:04 am UTC


User avatar
Sasha
Posts: 288
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:26 pm UTC
Location: The REAL wild wild west. At 7000 feet.
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Sasha » Wed Jun 24, 2009 5:01 am UTC

In my current conlang, rabbit is:
Nguhümawhaso.
And that's if it's a male rabbit, a female one would be the same only with -si instead of -so at the end.
Ng as in Ana Ng.
U is a schwa.
H if you're clearing the throat, it's a glottal fricative.
Ü as in the oo in pool.
M in a normal m.
A as in star.
Wh is a fricative said from the same place the "l" is in English.
A again.
S is normal.
O as in over.
Marbas wrote:I'll usually jump from one strange thought to the next, such gems as: "I wonder if bears get depressed", "I think the sun is unnecessarily smug" and so on.

Alexius
Posts: 342
Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:45 pm UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Alexius » Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:27 pm UTC

(Modern) Greek: κουνἐλι (kouneli).
(Ancient) Greek: λαγος (lagos, with a hard "a" and a hard "o") means "hare", I don't know if they had a specific word for rabbit. The modern scientific name for the European rabbit is Oryctolagus cuniculus- the genus name (first part) is Greek for "digging hare", and the second part is Latin for "rabbit".
(Biblical) Hebrew: ארנבת (arnebet), I believe. In the book of Leviticus, the only part of the Bible AFAIK in which rabbits are mentioned (in the list of animals which should not be eaten), there is this word (arnebet) which is usually translated as "hare" and another word, שפן (shafan) which has sometimes been translated as "rabbit", but is now considered to mean "hyrax".

The wikipedia page for "rabbit", if you loook at the "in other languages" has some good ones- apparently the Navajo for rabbit is "Gah".

User avatar
Roĝer
Posts: 445
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:36 pm UTC
Location: Many worlds, but mostly Copenhagen.
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Roĝer » Wed Jun 24, 2009 4:25 pm UTC

In esperanto, rabbit is kunikulo. pl. kunikuloj


Typo there. It's kuniklo.
Ik ben niet koppig, ik heb gewoon gelijk.

User avatar
Schmorgluck
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 2:48 am UTC
Location: Nantes

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Schmorgluck » Wed Jun 24, 2009 4:38 pm UTC

In Breton, that would be "konikl", pronounced /konik/.
Image

anschelsc
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 4:10 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby anschelsc » Fri Jun 26, 2009 5:01 am UTC

The Yiddish word (according to Weinreich) is "‫קיניגל‬", pronounced "kinigl" with the accent on the first syllable (and all i's in Yiddish are short, like English "is"). This is also, incidentally, the diminutive of "kinig", which is an seldom-used word for "king" (I believe this is coincidental, but with Yiddish you never know).

User avatar
Thrillho
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 1:26 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Thrillho » Fri Jun 26, 2009 5:34 pm UTC

In Estonian, rabbit is jänes, pronounced sorta like "yeah-ness".

Children tend to call a rabbit "jänku", however. This would be pronounced closer to "yeahn-koo." It means the same basic thing, except I suppose it would be closer to "bunny".

I apologize for the way my pronunciations look, the key thing to remember is the " ä " is supposed to sound like the " a " in "hat".

Kalathalan
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:06 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Kalathalan » Wed Jul 01, 2009 6:25 pm UTC

---
Last edited by Kalathalan on Mon Jun 06, 2016 8:08 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

dhs100
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:52 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby dhs100 » Thu Jul 02, 2009 5:13 am UTC

Icelandic...kanína

kaa-nee-naa

nike
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 5:54 pm UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby nike » Tue Jul 14, 2009 5:56 pm UTC

it's "tochtli" in nahuatl - toʃtli.

User avatar
Link
Posts: 1327
Joined: Sat Mar 07, 2009 11:33 am UTC
Location: ᘝᓄᘈᖉᐣ
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Link » Thu Aug 13, 2009 9:08 pm UTC

Dutch: konijn.

It's pronounced somewhat like "co-nine", but with a shorter and harder "nine" part.

etmorpi
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:01 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby etmorpi » Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:32 am UTC

Persian / Farsi: khargoosh (خرگوش), literally "donkey-ears" (khar+gush).

User avatar
Hobgoblin
Posts: 245
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 12:21 am UTC
Location: Dallas, TX
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Hobgoblin » Mon Aug 17, 2009 1:11 pm UTC

In Korean: 토끼 , which Romanized is to-kki, like toe-key.
Life is the best toy anyone could ever give you, and I'm going to play with it until it breaks.

VanLeeroy
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 9:30 am UTC
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby VanLeeroy » Wed Sep 07, 2011 2:13 pm UTC

in Belorusian "rabbit" will sound the sama as in Russian "krolik" but teh spelling is different: "кролiк"



Is it enough for gsm repeater AT 800 to have 1000mw capacity?
Last edited by VanLeeroy on Tue Oct 28, 2014 2:25 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

goofy
Posts: 911
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 3:32 pm UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby goofy » Thu Sep 08, 2011 12:21 am UTC

windshrike wrote:I can't type the characters(lacking the font), but in Malayalam it'd be pronounced 'Muyal'.


മുയല്‍

etmorpi wrote:Persian / Farsi: khargoosh (خرگوش), literally "donkey-ears" (khar+gush).


Hindi/Urdu has the same word (ख़रगोश/خرگوش), borrowed from Persian.

The Greek word for "rabbit", λαγώς is usually derived from two Proto-Indo-European roots: *sleh₁g- "soft" and *h₂eus- "ear". So etymologically "floppy ears".

Mapar
Posts: 129
Joined: Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:26 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Mapar » Sun Sep 11, 2011 5:08 am UTC

Link wrote:Dutch: konijn.

It's pronounced somewhat like "co-nine", but with a shorter and harder "nine" part.


This is the explanation of the "ij" sound I like best. Say a "short", staccato "e" and draw it out. You should get something that sounds somewhat like the French è.
Hi.

User avatar
tastelikecoke
Posts: 1208
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:58 am UTC
Location: Antipode of Brazil
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby tastelikecoke » Sun Sep 11, 2011 12:08 pm UTC

In Filipino:
kuneho.

Too bad it's just a perfectly transferred loanword from Spanish.

tesseraktik
Posts: 218
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 9:14 pm UTC
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby tesseraktik » Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:14 pm UTC

Lojban: le ractu
If you want to use it as a name, you could say la ractut. or something.

No Klingon word for "rabbit", I'm afraid; don't know if they have them on Qo'noS. The closest equivalents I can think of are tribbles, and the word for "tribble" is yIH.
ni'o mi nelci le zirpu sovmabrnornitorinku
Spoiler:
++$_ wrote:What's a "degree"?

EDIT: I looked it up on Wikipedia. Apparently it's some ancient Babylonian unit for angles :/

User avatar
modularblues
Posts: 689
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2009 8:33 am UTC
Location: Escher's Wonderland
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby modularblues » Tue Sep 13, 2011 4:44 am UTC

Traditional Chinese - 兔(子), where the 子 is like a "tag-on" suffix common in colloquial speech. Pronounced roughly "Tu Tz".

Mambrino
Posts: 388
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 9:45 pm UTC
Location: No we don't have polar bears. Except in zoos.

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Mambrino » Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:20 am UTC

Rokue wrote:In Finnish it's kani, pronounced "kani" (the k as the k in kite).


Also; IPA: [ˈkɑni]. Vowel 'a' as the a in car, not rat. (Many foreigners tend to make that mistake.)

The word itself is related to (or possibly even comes from, I don’t know that much about linguistics) the Swedish kanin.

jano
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 29, 2010 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby jano » Thu Sep 15, 2011 5:03 pm UTC

Zak wrote:=P

In spanish it's Conejo, but the j sounds like an h.

Not sure about in other languages, but in Spanish "conejo" also has a slang / sexual meaning. "Coneja" may be the female rabbit or a prolific woman. "Gazapo" is a young rabbit - or a typo.
:D
Spoiler:

Amelie
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:08 pm UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Amelie » Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:20 pm UTC

'kurdgheli" in Georgian.

User avatar
Eugo
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat May 31, 2008 5:38 am UTC
Location: here
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Eugo » Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:15 pm UTC

Nyúl, IIRC, in Hungarian (ny being the palatalized n, and acute meaning length); nyszi (sz reads as simple s) would be a bunny.

In Serbian, Croatian and other previously same languages, zec/зец (z/з as z in zero, c/ц as in pizza) for a male rabbit; pl. zečevi/зечеви. Fem. zečica/зечица (č/ч = china; all vowels short). Zeka/зека (with a longer open e) is a bunny. This is related to other Slavic forms of the word. Zečić/зечић (ć/ћ being a softer, palatalized č/ч, close to gotcha).

The word kunić/кунић probably denotes the hare, or vice versa. I never learned which is which. That one probably comes from Latin roots, but by unknown route. It could have come through any neighboring language, including Latin itself back in the late first and early second millennium.
United we stand politically corrected, divided we fall in love

susan12
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2012 4:46 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby susan12 » Tue Jul 03, 2012 2:05 am UTC

I have some answers for this question by some IndoChinese languages:
- Vietnamese: rabbit = "thỏ"
- Indonesian: rabbit = "kelinci
- Thai: rabbit = "กระต่าย"

hope it helpfull :)

User avatar
WanderingLinguist
Posts: 230
Joined: Tue May 22, 2012 5:14 pm UTC
Location: Seoul
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby WanderingLinguist » Tue Jul 03, 2012 8:28 pm UTC

Someone already posted Korean, so instead, I give you the first verse of a song about rabbits:

산토끼 토끼야
어디를 가느냐
깡충깡충 뛰면서
어디를 가느냐

We had to learn this and sing it in Korean class.

Actually, 산토끼 (san-to-kki) is a wild hare or jackrabbit (literally, "mountain rabbit"). Even when I understand something in Korean, I'm rather horrible about translating it into English, but roughly, it's something like:
"jackrabbit, jackrabbit! Where are you going? Ggang-cchung ggang-cchung*, where are you running away to?"

* Ggang-cchung ggang-cchung is supposed to be the sound of a rabbit hopping, I think.

willaaaaaa
Posts: 79
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2012 5:09 pm UTC
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby willaaaaaa » Tue Jul 03, 2012 10:54 pm UTC

My languages have already been covered, but possible other themes:

- Names of startups/websites (Kickstarter, Bing, etc.)
- Programming languages (Java, Python, etc.)
- Famous cartoon rabbits (Bugs, Thumper, Roger, etc.)
- Words that rhyme with "bunny" (Sunny, Funny, etc.)
- Superheroes (Superman, Catwoman, etc.)
- Types of eggs (SunnySideUp, Scrambled, Hardboiled, etc.)
- Influential scientists (Einstein, Tesla, etc.)
- Periodic table elements (Titanium, Tungsten, etc.)
- Uncommon colors (Chartreuse, Fuchsia, etc.)
- Pokemon (Jigglypuff, Starmie, etc.)
- Pixar characters (Wall-E, Merida, Sully, Boo, etc.)
- Onomatopoeia (Bam, Whoosh, etc.)
- Supreme Court Justices (Scalia, Ginsburg, etc.)
"If you can't control your peanut butter, you can't expect to control your life." - Bill Watterson

User avatar
Sir Novelty Fashion
Posts: 78
Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 1:36 pm UTC
Location: The Eleven-Day Empire

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Sir Novelty Fashion » Mon Jul 09, 2012 4:00 pm UTC

stevekl wrote:This is why language is cool. The Welsh words look enough like other languages' words for "king" (like German König). The Czech word for king is král -- and ek/ik is a dimunitive, so possibly "rabbit" - králik - might be "little king". Not having a Czech etymological dictionary handy, who knows.

Of course, the Welsh word for king (according to online translations I find) is nothing at all like this; this is how folk etymologies, which are almost always wrong, start. Still, it's interesting.

A more directly relevant example is probably Anglo-Saxon, where the word for 'king' is 'cyning', pronounced "koo-ning". :)
The art of advertisement, after the American manner, has introduced into all our life such a lavish use of superlatives, that no standard of value whatever is intact.

tesseraktik
Posts: 218
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 9:14 pm UTC
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby tesseraktik » Wed Jul 11, 2012 9:52 pm UTC

In Dothraki, mawizzi means either "rabbit" or "rabbits". mawizzish is the diminutive form of the word; "bunny", perhaps.
ni'o mi nelci le zirpu sovmabrnornitorinku
Spoiler:
++$_ wrote:What's a "degree"?

EDIT: I looked it up on Wikipedia. Apparently it's some ancient Babylonian unit for angles :/

User avatar
Lynx Cat
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 4:10 pm UTC
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Contact:

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby Lynx Cat » Thu Jul 12, 2012 11:52 pm UTC

lanicita wrote:
bridge wrote:In italian is coniglio

And it's pronounced "cohn-eel-yo". The "igli" sound in Italian sounds like the "illi" in "million".

In the book Watership Down, they don't really have their own word for rabbit, but their word for doe is "marli." It would be cool if you named one of the females that! By the way, if you haven't read it, you'd love it if you love rabbits.


Damn, beat me to the punch :P There's also hlessi, which means a wandering rabbit of sorts.

In Portuguese it's coelho, pronounced coh-eh-lho, with the "lh" being a palatalized L. Similiar to the "gli" in Italian in fact. I guess a "ly" (as in coh-eh-lyo), with a very short "y", would be a more or less close approximation (as would the "million" thing above), but neither is quite right. It's just a sound that doesn't exist in English.
LIVE FOREVER OR DIE TRYING

hyunchoi98
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:40 am UTC

Re: Saying "rabbit" in other languages

Postby hyunchoi98 » Wed Jul 18, 2012 3:34 am UTC

It's 토끼 in korean pronounced 'toe-ggi' with a hard g sound.


Return to “Language/Linguistics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests