accented adjectives

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ZLVT
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accented adjectives

Postby ZLVT » Thu Sep 04, 2008 4:36 pm UTC

Adjectives describe nouns. The past participle in English is also used often to modify nouns e.g.

the eaten meal, the hallowed grounds etc.

Many adjectives and past participles end in -ed which is often pronounced -d or -'d. However, in words like winged as in the winged angel the e (often) is pronouced.

I've seen it used before, to distinguish pronounciation and hence meaning, that the -ed ending is written accented i.e. -éd. Forming hallowéd and wingéd. Certainly Terry Pratchett is fond of them and there were quite a few in Shakespeare.

I've fallen into the habit of (often jokingly but now more habitually) using the accent over things like msn to distinguish my meaning or pronounciation but does anyone else do this?
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby schmiggen » Thu Sep 04, 2008 4:56 pm UTC

I don't currently do this, but I like the idea.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby Silas » Fri Sep 05, 2008 1:45 am UTC

Wouldn't you want a diaresis (ë) instead of an accute (é)? Because the stress in winged is still on the wing. You'd never pronounce it *wingéd.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby ZLVT » Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:30 am UTC

I guess you're still ADDING emphasis to -ed. I thought Diereses were only used in vowel sequences.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby GhostWolfe » Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:47 am UTC

Spanish uses the diaeresis to indicate that a "u" (following a "g") should be pronounced, when pronuciation guidelines would suggest otherwise.

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Re: accented adjectives

Postby KingLoser » Fri Sep 05, 2008 7:09 am UTC

Use them, but not sure if in the same way. They're used in Irish, so they pop up a lot in hiberno-english.

í is like ee, ú like oo, é is ay, and á is ah. ó is almost impossible to tell from ú when used on it's own like that.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby healingkid » Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:21 am UTC

In those cases each suffix would be accentèd this way: "accentèd" (using a grave accent rather than the acute accent seen in french "é" and elsewhere).

It's your call.

It's considered old-school/archaic these days in prose. Poets frequently use it to add or clarify a syllable. You can bring it back.

Be artful with it.

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Re: accented adjectives

Postby ZLVT » Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:30 am UTC

I SHALL!

but why the grave and not acute? (I have acute but not grave on my keyboard) My French is rather poor, meaning non-existant.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby hyperion » Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:43 am UTC

ZLVT wrote:I SHALL!

but why the grave and not acute? (I have acute but not grave on my keyboard) My French is rather poor, meaning non-existant.

The e-acute is pronounced like "ay" while the grave is pronounced "eh".
...Err that didn't work too well.
é is [e] in IPA while è is [ɛ]. For a grave, the mouth is more open.


This is much easier in person!

EDIT: to actually answer your question, listen to the difference between "wing-ed" and "wing-aid". The second is an e-acute, and sounds stupid so it isn't used :P
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:29 pm UTC

hyperion wrote:EDIT: to actually answer your question, listen to the difference between "wing-ed" and "wing-aid". The second is an e-acute, and sounds stupid so it isn't used :P

No, the second would be e-accute if we were speaking and writing French, which we're not.

I'd have to see the original folios of Shakespeare to know which direction those originally went, but in reprinted editions, it seems simply that English used the acute accent to indicate pronunciation of an otherwise silent vowel in -ed endings.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby Random832 » Fri Sep 05, 2008 3:05 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
hyperion wrote:EDIT: to actually answer your question, listen to the difference between "wing-ed" and "wing-aid". The second is an e-acute, and sounds stupid so it isn't used :P

No, the second would be e-accute if we were speaking and writing French, which we're not.

I'd have to see the original folios of Shakespeare to know which direction those originally went, but in reprinted editions, it seems simply that English used the acute accent to indicate pronunciation of an otherwise silent vowel in -ed endings.


I've seen typeset poetry (in modern english textbooks) with "-èd" in it.

Wikipedia concurs.

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Re: accented adjectives

Postby Monika » Fri Sep 05, 2008 3:42 pm UTC

ZLVT wrote:I have acute but not grave on my keyboard

Are you sure? Shift + ´, a (that is press shift and keep, press ´ and release both, press a) doesn't give you à?
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby ZLVT » Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:09 pm UTC

I use Suse linux. The only reason I have íűóőúöüéá is for Hungarina and those are manually inputted (?) into the computer, so when I finish my exams I'll go through and re-config. everythign for Arabic, Cyrill, Greek, Hebrew, and all sorts of Euro orthographies (FINALLY!) but 'till then I'm stuck thus.
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Re: accented adjectives

Postby BrainMagMo » Sat Sep 06, 2008 10:30 am UTC

I have always seen accentèd past participles, not accentéd ones, when reading Shakespeare, &c.
I've onlt seen accute when e is alone at the end of words, and still pronounced. e.g. café, resumé.

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Re: accented adjectives

Postby ironypoisoning » Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:00 pm UTC

BrainMagMo wrote:I have always seen accentèd past participles, not accentéd ones, when reading Shakespeare, &c.
I've onlt seen accute when e is alone at the end of words, and still pronounced. e.g. café, resumé.


To clarify, the acute accent is used in French, and thus, carried over to English (at least in the case of words like café and resumé), to indicate an 'e' that should be pronounced like an 'ay'. The grave accent is, in contrast, used to indicate a 'e' that should be pronounced like an 'eh'. It's got nothing to do with whether the 'e' is at the end or not, although it is common. For example, look at words like 'ésprit' and 'élite'. It just indicates how the 'e' should have been pronounced in French, which is commonly also the way to pronounce it in English.

I looked at the Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_accent) but it didn't provide much more insight than has already been given on this thread... only said that the accent and grave marks are often both used in accenting past participles such as 'picked' and doesn't really provide a history thereof, etc...
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