American Sign Language

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

Rilian
Posts: 496
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 1:33 pm UTC

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Rilian » Tue Oct 28, 2008 6:48 pm UTC

pedestrian wrote:How would you feel if someone from another country came up to you and told you they were the authority on speaking your language--even though it's your language?


1. This is irrelevant, since I didn't say I was the authority on ASL.
2. English is not my language alone. It belongs to everyone who uses it.

I don't understand why you seem to be so bitter about this. And for saying how much you feel that the Deaf community does not accept you, you rejected their invitation to enter in. Getting a sign name from a Deaf person is a big deal. That's how they welcome you in to their culture. No, of course she doesn't own you. It's the same thing as getting a nickname; does that person own you?


I shouldn't have to let them give me a name. I can make up my own name. And they should accept it when I say "this is my name". To insist that they have to give me the name is to treat me as inferior.

It's not like a nickname, it's like a name. I have my name IRL. I also have a couple of nicknames. The nicknames were given to me by people who *know* me, unlike that deaf person to tried to name me. She wasn't giving me a nickname, she was trying to name me.

I should (and ultimately do, because deaf people do not own sign language) have the option of choosing my own sign name. If a friend comes with a sign nickname for me, and I don't object to it, then I have the sign name and the sign nickname.


I am trying to be polite as I can, but do you even know anything about Deaf culture?
I know what we were told in that class. I've said this already.
Their culture formed because their hearing families abandoned THEM
Nuh-uh. Maybe sometimes, but not all the time. In the book Deaf Like Me, Lynn's family learned sign language, and Lynn abandoned them and went to a boarding school for deaf people.
and put them in deaf schools to try and make them function like hearing people.
I don't think going to a school for deaf people will make a person function like a hearing person.
So yes, their culture is valid according to your definition, since they acquired it with and from their friends.

By abandoning their families, which they should not do.

I'm not talking about people who had a reason other than being deaf to leave their families. I said that already.

crystal_owl wrote:Thank you, pedestrian. After such an obnoxious response from Rilian I was struggling to be polite at all!

It's the "deaf community" that is obnoxious. I'm objecting to their treatment of me as inferior, and you call that obnoxious!?
And I'm -2.

User avatar
Monika
Welcoming Aarvark
Posts: 3673
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Monika » Wed Oct 29, 2008 6:31 pm UTC

Rilian wrote:It can be just as much a culture as a group of friends can be. But your culture comes from your family.

How about calling it a subculture? Would you accept that?

To suggest that there is a real deaf culture is to imply that deaf people largely abandon their families. If that is true, it should not continue, and no one should encourage it.

In a lot of US TV series (crime stuff and so on) it is mentioned at one time or another that apparently a significant number of deaf people in the US choose to live in something like a "deaf family" ... deaf people to whom they are not related by blood. Because they feel not understood by their natural family.

One could argue that TV series are not that great an indicator for the real culture of a country, but I think to a certain degree they are. (Not necessarily literally ... e.g. the behavior of a person in a TV series might also be an indicator what most people of that culture would find to be outrageous.)

There are a lot of things I consider part of my identity (AS, wearing glasses, my hair color) but I do not form a culture around those things with other people who share those qualities. Seriously. To do so would be idiotic. My culture comes first and foremost from my family, and secondarily from my friends. And just so there's not any confusion, I don't just mean my culture. Your culture comes from your family, too. If you're in a different culture than your family, that means you abandoned them. Maybe you had a good reason, but being deaf is not a good reason.

Wouldn't you e.g. consider the way of dressing, music, typical hair styles, way of greeting each other, style of talking to be a kind of culture (or maybe subculture)? Don't think of deaf people, think of teenagers. They are so different from their parents and they fall into various groups in middle and high school. Each group preferring a certain type of music and a way of dressing, hair, talk that goes with it. It's definitely a subculture, and one might want to call it a type of culture, too.

In some ways, deaf people are a lot less distinct. They don't dress different from hearing people and so on. But in other ways, they are more distinct. They have their own language, their own poetry and so on. And there are more things, they behave differently in some ways. I don't know about American deaf people, but in Germany it seems the deaf are less afraid to offend others. E.g. in spoken German to say "you are fat" or about a person "he is fat" is really offensive. (The same in the US as far as I am aware.) But my sign teacher is called ("name-signed") "the fat one" by his deaf friends. (The name sign he uses himself is different.)

So if you consider it to be a culture or a subculture depends on what makes a different culture for you, what is most important. Does clothing, food and such matter most? Then the deaf certainly don't have their own culture, only a subculture. But I think one can certainly argue that the most important things about culture are language, literature, poetry and the way people behave to each other. In that sense there is absolutely nothing wrong with saying "deaf culture".

The class I took (with all the events I went to, and the videos, and lessons from the book) gave the impression that deaf people spend time largely only with other deaf people. That's -stupid-.

Why do you think that's stupid? It's natural. How much time do you spend with Chinese who don't speak any English (or other language that you can speak)? Probably not so much. Some deaf people can lip-read and speak (voice-speak) very well, but many have a lot of trouble with this. Spending their free time with hearing people who are unable to sign would be about as much fun for them as you spending your free time with Chinese who don't know English. In Germany, deaf people have their own meeting centers in cities and large towns, where they spend much of their free time with each other (or so my sign teacher said). I don't know if it's the same in the US, but it certainly wouldn't be stupid if it is.

Also, getting into another thing which annoyed me (which I said before I wasn't going to get into): I've been interested in ASL, as I said, since I was 7. I finally took the class, along with 2 other second language classes (and I've added another since then), because I think that it is good to be able to communicate with as many people as possible, and there's no reason why they should make the effort rather than me. Therefore, I go to great lengths to learn as much as I can of many languages. I thought ASL was a great choice because it is far easier for me to learn ASL than it is for some deaf people to learn to speak. I felt that it was my obligation as a person to try to connect with everyone, including deaf people. But I was met with obnoxious behaviour. For a hearing person to enter the deaf community at all, they have to go in as a 3rd class denizen. First come the deaf, then the coda's, and then the losers like me who apparently "don't know" and ought to just shut up most of the time, according to the "deaf community".

You really put much effort into learning other languages, but it seems you are not so willing to learn about other cultures. Have you spent time outside the US? Maybe it would help you be more open towards people of other cultures, including other subcultures inside the US.

I went to this thing called SLK as part of the ASL class. It was a lunch where everyone supposedly communicates only in ASL. It was stupid to go because I knew almost nothing and could not really talk to anyone. And they didn't seem to want me there, anyway. But there was another student there, and he was "hard of hearing" and had a hearing aid. He was "mainstreamed" and was now trying to learn ASL. He sucked at it though. He said he had trouble spelling his name because it was so long, so I said "Just make up a sign name and tell people that." Then this girl next to me went off on how *you are not allowed to make your own sign name* *a deaf person has to give it to you* Seriously, wtf? Deaf people do not own sign language, nor do they own sign names. Also, that guy was deaf himself. Also, in this book we read for the class, Deaf Like Me, the character Bruce made up his own sign name. That day, right before the lunch, a deaf woman who worked at the school saw me and said hi and then was signing, "you *sign name*". It took me like 10 minutes to realize what she was saying, because the idea of someone else telling me what my name is is F-ing Ridiculous. I reject that sign name. That woman does not own me. There was another person who was a coda who ranted at me for like 30 minutes about the sign name thing.

Well, that also seems kind of weird to me. In my German sign language class, we were all asked to select our own name signs. Never was it mentioned that a deaf person should give it to us.

But then, as I mentioned before, my (almost deaf) sign teacher was given a name sign by his deaf friends. He uses the sign for "hearing aid" for himself, because he has one. His friends call him "fat". Doesn't seem so nice, but apparently it's no problem for him at all. Even though he still prefers to be called "hearing aid" ;) .

How do deaf Americans get their name signs? Do they choose them or are they given them by parents, sign teachers, friends?

I'm pretty much soured on ASL at that school, but I don't blame all deaf people for it. I'm still trying to learn. A friend I met last year (who is now in my fraternity) is deaf and so our group uses a lot of sign language. Also, we had a brother before who was hearing impaired because of a neurological problem, and he used sign language also.

Erg. To sum up that angry rant, deaf people do not own sign language; nor do they own sign names; nor do the deaf americans own ASL. And I'm really pissed off that I was treated so poorly when I was clearly making an effort to communicate with them by learning ASL.

I am sorry for you that you had such bad experiences.

But you also have to consider one thing: For a long time, deaf people, in America and all over the world, were kind of suppressed. For example in many schools for the deaf the children were punished for using sign language until a short time ago! Can you imagine that? They had to fight to get accepted and get their rights. In Germany in most states deaf children are still mostly taught orally (even though they don't get into trouble for signing). So many barely get the lowest of the three levels of high school diplomas that exist, because they can simply not understand their teachers! If all of this weren't so and had never been so, deaf people probably wouldn't put as much emphasis on having their own culture and pointing out that it is just as valuable as the mainstream hearing culture. For you it's natural to think that deaf people are just as valuable as hearing people and that is good! But many deaf people have experienced that they were considered less valuable by some hearing people, that their sign language was considered inferior or not a real language at all, even by people emotionally important to them like teachers or maybe even parents. It's getting much better now as far as I am aware, but of course adults can't just simply forget that experience.
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
Please donate to help these people

User avatar
crystal_owl
Posts: 182
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 11:16 am UTC
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby crystal_owl » Wed Oct 29, 2008 8:05 pm UTC

I'm just gonna put it out there that the fact that Rilian clearly has such a hard time understanding and accepting that there is a deaf culture, and that it's important to a lot of deaf people, is a prime example of why so many of us feel the need to form a seperate community. I'm not going to go into the number of times I've been made to feel like a second class human being because of my deafness, but every time it happens I've been so grateful for the support and friendship of my deaf friends. You know, random deaf people who've never met you before will feel perfectly at ease going up to each other and introducing themselves if they notice you're also deaf, not out of elitism, but out a shared understanding. That doesn't happen with hearing people.
www.justgiving.com/sarah88

User avatar
Insanity's Partner
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 7:17 am UTC
Location: Opposite-Florida

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Insanity's Partner » Thu Oct 30, 2008 3:19 pm UTC

...Rilian, if you can't accept Deaf culture as it is, how can you be interested in it at all? Are you as equally obnoxious with other languages' cultures as you are with ASL? Would you go to France and call everyone conceited for giving air-kisses as their way of greeting? ASL is almost entirely based *on* its culture. ASL *is* a culture in itself. To really understand the general resentment in Deaf culture against hearing people, you have to understand how hearing people have tried to take over their culture, and even *eliminate* them altogether.

Alexander Graham Bell's wife was deaf. He was a firm believer that deaf people should be separated from eachother, and made to learn to speak so they could function in a hearing world. He believed that eventually, this separation would cause the deaf gene to die out.

He's sort of considered to be a mild version of Hitler among the Deaf community. Basically, time and time again history has shown that hearing people have tried to abolish sign language in America altogether. Is it any wonder why they don't want hearing people to come in and take over their language *again*?

I guess, for a serious understanding of Deaf Culture, I would refer you to the Through Deaf Eyes documentary made by PBS. I advise that you shouldn't start an argument over something that you don't really seem to understand at all.

It's a culture. It's their way of living and interacting. If you can't accept it, don't bother interacting in the first place.
Dead Like Me: (n.) [ded lajk mi:] Firefly for people who excel at not giving a shit.

signBY
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 4:55 am UTC

Re: American Sign Language

Postby signBY » Mon Jan 05, 2009 5:27 am UTC

I am an interpreter for the Deaf. I fell in love with ASL, then with the Deaf. I have many Deaf friends, CODA (Child of Deaf Adult) friends, HOH (hard of hearing) friends, hearing friends who have learned sign....

I've been studying Sign for only four years. I took a basic ASL class, and from there my best tool was immersion. The American Sign Language DVDs produced by Jehovah's Witnesses were the biggest help. Several books of the Bible and various other materials are translated into some of the best ASL I've ever seen. Then members of the Deaf community were helpful.

There is a certain "rite of passage" to gain a level of acceptance in the Deaf community... and why not? They have a history of being oppressed; you have to build trust. (Please correct me if I'm wrong, Deaf readers!) But once it's clear that you aren't trying to run their lives, aren't learning ASL solely because it's "a beautiful language," that you are capable of respecting them as equals and friends... you can build ties.

I love the way the language works still... because of it's visual modality, meanings are conveyed much more explicitly. There's no need to struggle to understand the meaning because there aren't 50 words used, confusing the topic. For example, when helping a friend who asks how to sign something, they might ask, "How do you sign 'imitate?'" My first response is always, "Ask a Deaf person," but if none are around, the response would be, "What does imitate mean?" Or, "It depends." It changes based on context, and one sign can mean 10 related words. (imitate, copy, etc..., or imiation, false, fake, etc...) It's all about meaning and context!

Also the facial expression is a wonderful thing. And you can train yourself to do it. I would use the aforementioned DVDs and sign with them, specifically trying to make my face do what the signer's face did. Another way to practice it is to try to convey a message using only your face; no signs, no words. You'd be amazed at what you can do.

A short note about sign names: there are unwrtitten rules for sign names. Deaf people - culturally Deaf people - know them instinctively. The rest of us have to learn them through Deaf people explaining them and/or by studying up on it. That's why it's best to have a Deaf person name you. It will stick within the community and will be much more natural.

Since I didn't grow up signing, and ASL is my second language, I will never be an expert. Deaf people are the experts. But it is possible for a hearing person to learn sign language fairly well in a year with natural ability. The average required is two years last I read. And the more you can break with your hearing culture, the better you'll get along.

AGAIN- to all Deaf readers- please feel free to correct or add to anything I've written! Thanks!

User avatar
Sungura
When life gives you banananas, make bananana bread
Posts: 3928
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:32 am UTC
Location: AL

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Sungura » Mon Mar 30, 2009 2:42 am UTC

Thanks Chai for telling me about this thread! When I was about 14 I became interested in learning sign language and learned it through church, eventually started to interpret some there. I really enjoyed it, and I miss it. I'm sure I've become quite rusty by now.

I know a lot of this thread is kind of old but a great book IMO is "The Joy of Signing" the one I have is a bit old but I'm sure it's updated. And one thing I've noticed too is it seems different communities have some of their own signs. For example, at my church, we made up a sign for "CAT scan" because it was needed for the announcements that day - and needed more than once.

I've heard too that you are given a sign for your name, you don't make one up for yourself. At least the people I knew...for example, Nancy was a nurse so her sign was simply the sign for nurse.

My favorite thing to interpret were the songs...just all the expression! And I go to a church that sings a-capella, so we actually started to (for some songs, especially the ones where different parts sing different things) have more than one person interpreting - one for each part. It was really cool.

Nowadays I don't sign much at all though. :( The most I do is if I'm at a store and I notice someone is deaf/hoh I'll say hi. I usually feel bad though because then they'll usually start signing really fast and I'm so rusty I can't follow it so I have to ask them to slow down. I've never met anyone rude though, everyone is always very nice and slows down and then helps/fingerspells/etc if I get confused. :)
"Would you rather fight a Sungura-sized spider or 1000 spider-sized Sunguras?" -Zarq
she/<any gender neutral>/snug

User avatar
Chai Kovsky
Posts: 1652
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 3:36 pm UTC
Location: Californication

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Chai Kovsky » Mon Mar 30, 2009 2:59 pm UTC

It's true--people really will slow down and help you out. However, funny story:

I was on a kind of intern interview thing and the guy was asking me some questions about skills, what software did I know, what languages did I speak, and so on. I told him that I speak Spanish, French, Dutch, and I sign. He commented on the rarity of the last and moved on. I got the kind of impression that he categorized my sign skills with those people who say on their resumes they speak Polish when they don't know a word; however, five minutes later, a deaf homeless guy came up to us and signed to ask for some money and ask a place to get food. My interviewer grinned and playfully accused me of setting it up.

Moral of the story: Sign will get you jobs!
Spoiler:
kellsbells wrote:¡This Chai is burning me!
Chai Kovsky wrote:I can kill you with my brain.

That is all.
superglucose wrote:In other words: LISTEN TO CHAI.
Delayra wrote:Yet another brilliant idea from Chai!

I <3 Pirate.Bondage!

User avatar
Sungura
When life gives you banananas, make bananana bread
Posts: 3928
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:32 am UTC
Location: AL

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Sungura » Mon Mar 30, 2009 4:17 pm UTC

*giggles* that is awesome Chai. Yeah I have it on my resume too, and the only place I applied for that cared was when I was offered a job at K-mart. The interviewer didn't believe me and asked, "Do you really know it?" and I replied "Yes I do!" in ASL of course. ;) Come to think of it though, that is where I often run into someone, so I guess it makes sense. (Well, it is a "Sears Essentials" now since K-mart is gone.)

I would like to learn to lip-read. Christine is the one who taught sign language at my church, and she's hoh. Her daughter, who could sign and lip-read as well, started to teach me at one point, it was fun! I can't say I was ever any good at it though.
"Would you rather fight a Sungura-sized spider or 1000 spider-sized Sunguras?" -Zarq
she/<any gender neutral>/snug

Rilian
Posts: 496
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 1:33 pm UTC

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Rilian » Tue Mar 31, 2009 3:58 am UTC

Why do you think that's stupid? It's natural. How much time do you spend with Chinese who don't speak any English (or other language that you can speak)? Probably not so much. Some deaf people can lip-read and speak (voice-speak) very well, but many have a lot of trouble with this. Spending their free time with hearing people who are unable to sign would be about as much fun for them as you spending your free time with Chinese who don't know English. In Germany, deaf people have their own meeting centers in cities and large towns, where they spend much of their free time with each other (or so my sign teacher said). I don't know if it's the same in the US, but it certainly wouldn't be stupid if it is.


You seem to have misunderstood. It's stupid for deaf people to refuse to associate with hearing people who know the same sign language. That would be like me only associating with people who wear glasses just because I wear glasses.

Insanity's Partner wrote:...Rilian, if you can't accept Deaf culture as it is, how can you be interested in it at all?

Deaf culture as distincting from hearing culture is a myth. It's ridiculous that you capitalize the word. I explained in my first post in this thread why I am interested in ASL. I want to be able to communicate with as many people as possible. Not every deaf person is such a jerk as the few I met when I took that class.

Cryopyre wrote:Do deaf people think in hand movements?

I doubt it, considering I don't think in sounds.
Last edited by Rilian on Tue Mar 31, 2009 4:04 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
And I'm -2.

Richardmoffitt
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 8:22 am UTC

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Richardmoffitt » Mon Apr 06, 2009 8:28 am UTC

Hello,

I am deaf and a longtime Xkcd.com lurker. Since i saw this thread and find it interesting that people want to know about American Sign Language and discuss on it. So i decide to register to this forum and said hello to ya'll. :p Since, its pretty late at night that I need to go to bed now. So I will be back later to comment on it. :)

By the way, not all deaf people are jerk. Judge from the book's cover is really bad idea. If I think that one hearing person is jerk, then rest of them are jerk.

~Richard~

User avatar
Monika
Welcoming Aarvark
Posts: 3673
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Monika » Mon Apr 06, 2009 2:46 pm UTC

Hi Richard, welcome to the forum :) .
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
Please donate to help these people

User avatar
Insanity's Partner
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 7:17 am UTC
Location: Opposite-Florida

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Insanity's Partner » Fri May 01, 2009 4:50 am UTC

Cryopyre wrote:Do Deaf people think in hand movements?


I've actually seen the answer to this somewhere. They think and dream in ASL, the same way we think in English...so I assume this means yes.

On another note, I met a Deaf person who gave me a name sign a while ago. :D

It's the sign for "music" with a "v" instead of an open palm.
Dead Like Me: (n.) [ded lajk mi:] Firefly for people who excel at not giving a shit.

User avatar
Monika
Welcoming Aarvark
Posts: 3673
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Monika » Fri May 01, 2009 12:02 pm UTC

Dead Like Me: (n.) [Ded lyk Mee] Firefly for people who excel at not giving a shit.

How is "Dead like me" like "Firefly"?
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
Please donate to help these people

User avatar
ZLVT
Posts: 1448
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:56 pm UTC
Location: Canberra, Australia
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby ZLVT » Fri May 01, 2009 7:29 pm UTC

who did the "phonetic" transcription on that? [ded lajk mi:] is more like it.
22/♂/hetero/atheist/★☭/Image

Originator of the DIY ASL tags

User avatar
Monika
Welcoming Aarvark
Posts: 3673
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Monika » Sun May 03, 2009 9:35 pm UTC

I guess it's not meant to be IPA.
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
Please donate to help these people

User avatar
BrainMagMo
Posts: 185
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 6:22 am UTC
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby BrainMagMo » Mon May 04, 2009 10:18 am UTC

think me, we should gloss. better show ASL its Grammar

User avatar
reishka
Posts: 368
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:53 am UTC
Location: H20Bury, CT
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby reishka » Tue May 05, 2009 10:56 am UTC

Man, I leave the fora for awhile only to come back and see that I've missed all the good threads. This one was a good read.

Someone posted a page back a link to Keith Wann - if you're in the NYC area he's doing a show with a few other people next Monday in Queens. I don't know if anyone in this thread is interested in going, but I will be if I can make it (I might not be able to because Boy has a graduation ceremony that day and I don't know if we'll be able to pop over/if it'll end early enough to go).

User avatar
Insanity's Partner
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 7:17 am UTC
Location: Opposite-Florida

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Insanity's Partner » Wed May 20, 2009 3:44 am UTC

Monika wrote:
Dead Like Me: (n.) [Ded lyk Mee] Firefly for people who excel at not giving a shit.

How is "Dead like me" like "Firefly"?


Dead Like Me is similar to Firefly in that they were both great, well written shows that were canceled with millions of outraged fans. Of course, the main difference is that for Dead Like Me they recently came out with a movie that isn't completely horrifying, but not exactly too great either.

And the "excel at not giving a shit" part is from a quote from the pilot episode where George explains, "I'd say I was sorry to disappoint you [for not being who you thought I was], but I'm not; I excel at not giving a shit. Experience has taught me that interest begets expectation and expectation begets disappointment; so the key to avoiding disappointment is to avoid interest. A=B=C=A."

ZLVT wrote:who did the "phonetic" transcription on that? [ded lajk mi:] is more like it.


I know next to nothing about phonetic transcriptions...I was hoping no one would call me out on that. ^_^;; I rather prefer your version, though. Thanks.
Dead Like Me: (n.) [ded lajk mi:] Firefly for people who excel at not giving a shit.

User avatar
ZLVT
Posts: 1448
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:56 pm UTC
Location: Canberra, Australia
Contact:

Re: American Sign Language

Postby ZLVT » Thu May 21, 2009 12:19 pm UTC

cheers. Spend some time randomly eye-fucking the IPA charts on wiki. Eventually it will allll sink in. That or hang around the linguistis dept waaaay too much.
22/♂/hetero/atheist/★☭/Image

Originator of the DIY ASL tags

User avatar
Insanity's Partner
Posts: 53
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 7:17 am UTC
Location: Opposite-Florida

Re: American Sign Language

Postby Insanity's Partner » Mon May 25, 2009 6:29 pm UTC

ZLVT wrote:cheers. Spend some time randomly eye-fucking the IPA charts on wiki. Eventually it will allll sink in. That or hang around the linguistis dept waaaay too much.


Heh, I've tried learning with the IPA charts on Wiki, but it hasn't really helped me. I resolved to cross my fingers and hope to never encounter a situation in which I need to use a phonetic transcription.
Dead Like Me: (n.) [ded lajk mi:] Firefly for people who excel at not giving a shit.

User avatar
steewi
Posts: 873
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:38 am UTC
Location: Tropical Nowhere

Re: American Sign Language

Postby steewi » Tue May 26, 2009 6:01 am UTC

ZLVT wrote:cheers. Spend some time randomly eye-fucking the IPA charts on wiki. Eventually it will allll sink in. That or hang around the linguistis dept waaaay too much.

That's what I did! I'm still there.


Return to “Language/Linguistics”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests